CARDINAL ON A SNOWY MORNING

Imitation/Flattery

Today’s Daily Post suggests I write about something — anything — in the style of my favorite blogger. (Be sure to link to them!) I don’t have a favorite blogger. I have a lot of favorite bloggers, each a favorite for a different reason. Some make me laugh, others make me think. Their work entertains and inspires me … but how could I imitate one of them?


I have been left pondering the conundrum. I love my blogging friends … but copy someone’s style? I don’t think I can. It’s not they aren’t great writers, but imitable style is something else again. A favorite author, maybe Hemingway with his short, sharp, sentences. He’s easy to parody. Poe. Faulkner. Joyce. Wolfe. Easy to make fun of them, but I’m sure parody is not the same as imitation. And surely it’s not flattery.

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What to do? Then, an epiphany. Many of my favorite bloggers don’t write, or at least, not much. They are photographers. By fortuitous circumstance, this very morning I spied a flash of red in the big forsythia bush. I ran for a camera, all the while thinking of Suzanne Rogers, who takes gorgeous pictures of wildlife around her home.

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She doesn’t use a lot of words, but posts amazing pictures — especially of birds. Other creatures also populate her world, but the birds seem to steal the show.

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So not so much in imitation of A Window Into the Woods, but more in acknowledgement of her beautiful work, I present (short drumroll) – Cardinal On A Snowy Morning.

A WORLD FULL OF FRIENDS

Daily Prompt: Cut Off – When was the last time you felt really, truly lonely?


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Until this morning when I saw this prompt, I was feeling pretty good about the friends and relationships I’ve formed during the past three years of blogging. Now why would you go and ask this question? The people who write these prompts must be very young. They are forever bringing up depressing topics that are real downers. Only the young think it’s fun to explore bad times.

But here’s a real, no kidding, response. Because Garry and I were talking about this very thing last night before bed.


Years ago, when I moved to Israel, I was suddenly a single mother in a new country with no friends, or acquaintances. Most people spoke English only a little and the customs were different. Emigrating to another country and culture is hard, but that’s what I signed up for. I wanted culture shock. I wanted something different, new. I wanted to tough it out and discover I could do it on my own. I was just 30 and I was ready to take on the world.

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It has been a long time since I felt that way. Nothing I could do in my native land and language, could match or exceed the isolation of being on my own on foreign soil.

Of course I felt lonely and isolated. I really was isolated. It wasn’t a mood I was in, or a feeling. It was reality, even though it was in a place I had chosen. With all its perils, change is healthy.

I am not lonely anymore. Being physically challenged, if this were even 25 years ago, I probably would be. The Internet lets me reach out and find friends all over the world. You — yes, you with your pot of tea and crumpets — have rocked my world. You are my friends, my support. How can I be lonely with wonderful friends like you?

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Across continents and oceans, from every corner and culture around the globe, you are my friends. I have a whole world full of friends. What a wonder this blogging thing has turned out to be!

SCALE – THE BIG AND THE LITTLE

Weekly Photo Challenge: Scale — This week, share an image that highlights a size relationship — make us pause and take a second look to understand the scale of the elements in your photo.


 The cars and the mountains. How small is man compared to those mountains!

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 The osprey returns to the nest as the sun sinks behind the hills.

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BIRDS IN THE BUSH

Sunday morning, I woke to a blanket of snow across the landscape. Maybe 5 inches. Not a mega storm, but enough to cover the branches of the trees, the lawn, and the forest floor.

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I went out to take some pictures. Maybe it was the time of day … it was just a little past eight in the morning. There were dozens of little birds heading for the big forsythia bush. The birds love that bush. They love it in summer and spring and fall as well as in the winter. I don’t know if there is something there which they eat, or they just feel safe in its twisted branches.

We used to try to control it, but in recent years, it has quite gotten away from us, completely hiding the chain link fence that is the demarcation between our yard and the woods.

I was able to get some pictures of the little birds, something that usually eludes me. I don’t know what they are. Some kind of wren or finch. There are so many and they look very much alike. Our garden birds, sharing our world.

FOLLOWING THE BIRDS – CEE’S WHICH WAY PHOTO CHALLENGE

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge: 2015 Week #2

Cee’s Which Way Challenge is all about capturing the roads, walks, trails, rails on which we move from one place to another.  You can walk, climb, drive them, and ride them, as long as the way is visible.  Any angle of a bridge is good, as are all signs.

The wild birds always know where they are going. In the air, on the water, and or marching across land … they have a built in GPS that is close to flawless. In this valley, the rivers and ponds are their highways. They swim in rows, like a flotilla. The herons fly over the waterways, watching for fish to eat. The swans and geese nest along the waterways and raise their young.

We have gone through several very hard winters in a row. The population of swans and geese is smaller than it has been in all the years I’ve lived here. Nature rules. We can only watch and hope for the best.

So far, this winter has been kind to them. The waterways remain unfrozen. There is food for all. Perhaps this year we’ll see an early spring and many ducklings, goslings, and cygnets to repopulate our streams and ponds.

YOGI’S BLOGOSMOS wrote an entire blog analyzing the pictures in this post. Please check him out. A thoughtful blogger with a devotion to nature and beauty.

LIKE THE FIRST MORNING

New — Possibility. Opportunity. Potential.

As another year gets underway, let’s celebrate the new.


THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT

Cause, Meet Effect

You can singlehandedly create a causal relation between two things that are currently unconnected — a word and an emotion, a song and an extreme weather event, wearing a certain color and winning the lottery. What cause would you link to what effect, and why?


In chaos theory, the butterfly effect is the sensitive dependence on initial conditions where a small change in one state of a deterministic nonlinear system can result in large changes to a later state. The butterfly effect is a common trope in fiction, especially in time travel. 

I am a butterfly. I flap my dainty wings, then a tornado tears through Oklahoma. Would not flying at that precise minute, at that moment in time, have prevented the tornado?

I am a robin. I flap my dainty wings, after which a hurricane blows across an island in the Caribbean. If I had stayed on that fence, would the hurricane have passed by, unformed? If I had flown sooner, would the wind have blown in a different direction?

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Cause, meet effect. In reality, in fantasy, in the tunnels of time.

Do we really know what the effect is or will be when we do (or fail to do) anything … any more than the butterfly or the robin can predict the ultimate result of his or her wings?

I can imagine many answers. But I have more questions … many more than I have answers.