CEE’S FUN FOTO CHALLENGE: BLACK AND WHITE STUDIES

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge

yellow summer squash black and white

Vegetables are delectable in color and in monochrome. Different, but mm, good! Summer squash (summer not).

apache junction black and white

Apache Junction is a conveniently located ghost town, not far from Phoenix. It’s actually the first non-city “place” when you are trying to escape the urban sprawl. I was hoping for tumbleweed, but alas, none appeared.

Quality of Light - Black & White

In color, it’s all about the quality of the light. In black and white, the picture is an architectural study.

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Rooftops in downtown Boston, just down the block from symphony hall. Black and white emphasizes the texture of the bricks and roof as well as the lines and angles of the rooftop.

1788 FORGE HOUSE MONOCHROMES

It is on the corner of Route 140 and Chestnut Street in Upton. I don’t know who maintains it, but somebody takes pretty good care of it. Maybe it’s the state, perhaps some private party has undertaken its upkeep.

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It was a shoemaker’s shop from 1788 until 1938, when it became a forge. It is still known as “Forge House.” It has remained essentially unchanged since its conversion in the 1930s.

LITTLE OLD HOUSES WITH SMALL BARN

You could tell this was down by Cape Cod by the weathered wood siding on the little houses and barn, as well as the old — but still sturdy cedar pickets.

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I think these were originally cabins for hired help, probably ground workers. The barns are clearly not for cows. Probably to stable a couple of horses and maybe store a small rig.

Today, they are “out buildings,” decorative and useful for storage.

Week 27 — STILL SHARING MY WORLD

Share Your World – 2014 Week 27

If you were the architect of one existing building, which building would you select?

carnegie-hall

I’d sign up for Carnegie Hall. It’s got superb acoustics. It was built more than 100 years ago (opened in 1891) and remains one of the premier concert halls in the world. carnegiehall-inside

What is one of your favorite quotes?

“If you don’t know history, then you don’t know anything. You are a leaf that doesn’t know it is part of a tree. ”
― Michael Crichton

What color do you feel most comfortable wearing?

Black. It’s not a statement. I like the way it looks and it’s sort of a New York thing. I’m from New York. Did I ever mention that?

What is something you learned in the last week?

I learned I am an expert, a referenced source. On stuff about which I know next to nothing. This comes as a complete and peculiar surprise.

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FROM MONEY PIT TO MANSION

Reviving Bricks — You just inherited a dilapidated, crumbling-down grand mansion in the countryside. Assuming money is no issue, what do you do with it?

Author’s Note: It’s obvious to me that most of the responders to this prompt have never tried to renovate and/or restore an old house in the real world. I have. And I would never, ever, under any circumstances want to do it again. No matter how much money I have, I’d rather build something brand new. Old houses are seductive and hide their lethal intent. An old house can kill you. I know.


It helps to start off independently wealthy because odds are you will be poor when you are done.

Start by hiring a dependable contractor. Since the term “dependable contractor” is an oxymoron, you should also get a copy of the movie “The Money Pit.” It may help you survive the days ahead.

Old House in Hadley

Make sure the electrical system and plumbing are completely replaced. Old houses always need infrastructure upgrades — plumbing and wiring are always bad. Also, install new heating and cooling systems. Put in central air while the place is under construction.

You’ll need a new roof, gutters, leaders. Don’t forget to have the chimneys repointed. Make sure the dampers work, too. Some, if not all, of the windows will need to be replaced. Since money is no object, replace them all with double-hung thermals.

Restore interior moldings and woodwork. Many old homes have beautifully carved woodwork that’s been painted. When restored, it’s magnificent and often made of rare wood such as elm and chestnut. Rip out linoleum to discover the oak floors beneath. Refinish the hardwood.

Replace falling down porches and porticoes. Install new doors and lintels. Get an engineer to check the drainage. Do what you need to do to prevent flooding, especially if you live on a downhill slope. Your insurance won’t cover water damage from rising waters unless you live in a designated flood plain. I know it doesn’t make sense, but that’s the law, so put in a sump, a pump, drains. Whatever you need to keep your feet dry.

Pave the driveway and walks. Widen them if you live in an area where snowfall is heavy. Make sure your garage is big enough for the cars you own and will own in the future. And while you are at it, buy a garden tractor. You will need it.

If you have a well, replace the pump. Get a full inspection to make sure your water system is healthy. Ditto if you have a septic system. Water and septic are non-negotiable issues. And expensive.

Make sure you obtain all licences and inspections required by local law. You want to live in your house after spending all this time and money, right?

As for the exterior, it depends on the house. Some houses need siding, others paint, masonry repair … and many need a combination of all of these. If you bought an old Victorian — and you are not yet bankrupt — there are specialists who can restore the gingerbread moldings to their original glory.

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Gardens will no doubt need to be replanted and cleared out, patios rebuilt, gazebos restored. I would also want ramps and chair lifts installed. Make your bathrooms senior-friendly. Everyone gets old, even you.

Finally, the kitchen. Have some fun. Get a restaurant-quality range and double oven, a full upright freezer, refrigerator, dishwasher. Install as much cabinetry as a clever kitchen designer can arrange. Remember: No matter how much counter space you include, you will have no more than 14 inches of unoccupied space when you are done adding all the stuff that lives in the kitchen.

Make storage a priority everywhere. Build bookcases, closets and other storage areas everywhere. You cannot have too many closets. Nature abhors a vacuum, so they will all be full immediately.

Ah the splendors of an old house. It will eat you alive, leave you a gibbering wreck on the floor … but you will love that house. With a bit of luck, it will have some friendly ghosts who will love you in return.

ODD BALL PHOTOS – BLACK AND WHITE IN WEEK 17

Cee’s Odd Ball Photo Challenge: Week 17

A couple of pictures I took for some long-forgotten reason. I’m sure I saw something special in the light or something symbolic in the combination of objects in the picture.

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Both of these seemed to be right for black and white. In any case, that’s what I’ve done with them.

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This one reminded me of a scene in a film noir from the 1950s. The cobblestones, the light. The high contrast and burnt out highlights.

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EDGY

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Things with Edges

So many edges, so little time. Even soft things can be edgy. Flower petals, concrete and glass, steel and glass, bridge girders, and the light through a window all make their own edges. Really, it’s all about the light.


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Bouquet in bright sun

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Tallest building in Worcester

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Bridge over the Little Colorado

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Sunlight, blinds and a picture window

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Steel and glass shaft in hospital lobby

THE WALL

The Setting’s the Thing

My favorite place in Jerusalem was the Western Wall, sometimes incorrectly called the “Wailing Wall.” In Hebrew, it’s Kotel — it rhymes with motel.

I used to go to the Kotel to pray and leave messages for God.

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I loved the approach to the Temple mount. I would stand for a while, looking down at it from the approaching steps, trying to form an image of what it must have looked like when it was the hill where God talked to Isaac, where God said that He would never again ask for another human sacrifice. So what was with all the war and massacre and death?

Then I would walk down the stone steps to the wall and get as close as I could get, so my nose grazed the Wall. I would lay my cheek and the palms of my hands flat against it and feel the humming of power in those ancient stones.

Western wall overview

From close up, you see the messages, tens of thousands of messages rolled tightly into tiny scrolls tucked in the crevices between the rocks. Every kind of prayer, every kind of message, all on tiny folded pieces of paper, cradled by giant stones. The prayers, hopes, fears and gratitude of people who came to this special place to leave messages for God.

The Wall talks to you and says “You can leave your message here. God always checks his messages and He will get back to you.”

I always brought a message and tucked it into the stones. I knew God would read my message and get back to me. As surely as I knew Jerusalem is center of the universe and closer to Heaven then any other place on earth, I knew I lived down the street from His message center. If every prayer is heard, prayers left at this address got to Him sooner.

western wall with notes

There were groups of rabbis who spent their lives praying at the Wall. For a small fee, they would pray for you. If you believe there is a special potency to the prayers of pious men, the rabbis of the Kotel were worth a donation. They didn’t ask for much – whatever you could afford and for your money, you got a prayer specialist to put the word in for you.

I probably went to the Kotel more than a hundred times over the years, but I most remember one day above all others. I went that day because my mother was dying. I wanted to ask God to give my mother and I some time together.

It seemed pointless to pray for her cancer to be cured. It had spread too far, had invaded too much. I knew it was her time. I accepted death, even my mother’s, but a little time didn’t seem too much to ask.

I bought prayers from the rabbis, then went to the Wall and left my message among the stones.

More than thirty years have passed, but I bet my message is still there, exactly where I left it. With all the other messages left for God in the Western Wall at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

SO MANY MONUMENTS, SO LITTLE SPACE

Monument

Small town, overly fond of monuments has turned the town common into marble clutter. From the civil war, through all the other wars in which our soldiers have died. Perhaps smaller monuments more in balance with available space?

The photographs were taken by both Garry and I over the course of a couple of years using a variety of cameras and covering all seasons.

 

ARE YOU READY FOR THE ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE?

It has been two years since I discovered this fabulous piece of real estate. It’s still on the internet, but is it actually for sale today? No way to know, but no matter. I bet if you make the right good faith offer, you could snag this ideal piece of real estate for your anti-zombie compound.

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Until I a couple of year ago, I never much worried about the zombie apocalypse. Was I merely naïve? Probably. After following a variety of blogs, not to mention social media sites, I have come to realize I’ve been failing to pay proper attention to this threat.

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In my innocence, I worried about health care, the environment, extinction of species, loss of water resources and the fate of the Monarch butterfly. I spent far too much time trying to survive cancer and trying to keep a roof over my head. Someone somewhere said you can only worry about seven things at a time. If you add one more, one of the first seven disappears, drops off the list. It’s possible I didn’t have enough room in my brain to worry about zombies and thus failed to see the dangers of the looming Apocalypse.

That failure has been rectified. I dedicate an appropriate amount of mental energy towards planning against the attack of the brain-eating undead. Don’t ask me how much time that is. I won’t tell you.

As soon as I saw this property, I knew it was the solution. I can’t afford it on my own (I can’t afford anything at all) but I’m sure if we get together — maybe collect all the money Nigerian princes have been offering us — we could easily buy it. It would be the perfect safe haven. No zombies will eat our brains! 

It looks perfectly normal from above.

A second view of the house and it’s sub levels.

It’s when you start going down to lower levels that you realize what a peach of a property this really is — although it’s actually a gorgeous location, even if the zombies never attack.

Aerial view

Aerial view

A beautiful house in the Adirondacks is all you see from the air. Woods, lakes and streams, it’s downright idyllic. It’s got everything including a runway and hangar for private aircraft.

It gets better as you descend.

BelowGroundZombie

Underground, it’s a world of its own. How about that media room, eh? I’ve always wanted a room dedicated to electronic media. And maybe movies. Music, too. So maybe a little fixing up to make it perfect. It’s doable.

Really great media room!

Want to be safe? Secure? This is secure!

And, just in case the apocalypse never occurs, you’ve got a lovely estate not far from Saratoga with plenty of room for company.

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