WHERE’S MY WIFE?

As we were packing up to come home — really, I wasn’t packing so much as stuffing my belongings into a duffel – I was bummed. At having to come home to reality.

Reality is full of telephone calls. Details. Bills. Thanksgiving is next week, Christmas just a month after. Holidays and gifts mean money. Which is always a problem and inevitably ups my anxiety levels to absurd heights.

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As if the holidays aren’t enough, it’s also “open enrollment” for medical stuff. I need to take a hard look at Garry’s drug plan. And I need to be sure I’m in the best Medicare plan I can afford. I think the Blue Cross PPO I’ve got is as good as is available, especially considering its modest price.

Nonetheless, I need to check. If I find out I missed the boat, I’ll have a year of kicking myself before I can fix it.

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Then there is The Cell Phone. By now, everyone knows how I feel about cell phones. I no longer have one of my own, having had it turned off. Garry and I share one. Mostly, it’s his, but sometimes I use it too.

Which is fine, except it’s an iPhone 4 and more than 2 years old. It didn’t have good audio when it was brand new. Time has not improved either the phone or Garry’s hearing.

I’m looking at Amazon’s Fire phone now that they’ve dropped the price. Both Garry and I have Kindle Fire tablets and like them. We’re happy in the Amazon universe, so it might be a good fit for us … if AT&T won’t flatten us with fees and charges.

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Logically, it should be no big deal, but the way taxes are structured, it will be. I don’t understand people who actually want a new phone every year. I hate the whole process, the expense, learning the new equipment.

What a pain in the butt! Moreover, just to make it worse, Massachusetts requires we pay taxes on the full price of the phone no matter what the actual price. Which right now is 99 cents with a 2-year contract.

Garry’s existing contract with AT&T expires on December 20th, so I have to call. Find out what all of this will really cost. It’ll be 99 cents for the phone, plus a $40 “upgrade fee,” plus taxes. And who knows if the plan we have will be valid with a new phone.

By the time all is said and done, it’ll cost us hundreds of dollars … and Christmas is just around the corner. It makes me want to scream.

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There’s more. Lots more. Doctor appointments. Medication issues. Veterinarian trips. Dental work for Nan.

I need help. I’m overloaded, freaking out, tired. Stressed. I need someone to take care of business so I can relax. I need a go-to person to deal with the loose ends of our lives.

I need a WIFE.

THE STORY OF VETERANS DAY

Veterans Day, originally Armistice Day, initially celebrated the end of the first world war. The fields in Europe where the war was fought were full of wild red poppies and for many years, red poppies were the symbol of World War I.

2014 VetsDay

Fighting ended between the Allies and Germany at 11 AM on 11/11 – November 11, 1918. This is accepted almost universally as the end of “the war to end all wars.” Sadly, this barely interrupted the progression of war — and the holiday was known as Armistice Day.

After the police action in Korea concluded in 1954, “Veterans” was substituted for “Armistice.” The holiday became Veterans Day and honors veterans of all the wars we have ever fought. Which are a lot of wars and a great many veterans.

The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed amid considerable confusion on October 25, 1971. On September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford returned Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, starting 1978.

From the Veterans Administration:

Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the historical significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America’s veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good.

All honor to all our veterans, of all the wars we have throughout the years and around the world. Let’s hope in future years, we will have fewer battles to fight.

ELECTION DAY – NOVEMBER 4, 2014

vote today

If you don’t vote, you lose the right to complain about the government.

Get off your lazy butt. Go to the polls. Instead of whining about it on Facebook or ranting on your blog, be a citizen. Stand up and be counted. Vote!


We voted. The rest of the world is discussing the pluses and minuses of electronic and online voting, but here in Uxbridge, we have paper ballots. And black ballpoint pens with which to fill them out.

We also have really long referendum items. It took half an hour to just read all that fine print.

Do we want casinos in Massachusetts? And, by the way, how about expanding the greyhound racing so they can abuse even more dogs? (No, we don’t. Casinos do not improve the economy. They just bring in crime and infrastructure expenses.)

Would we like to  have our commonwealth charge us even more for a whole bunch of new things to recycle? Like we don’t pay enough? (No, thank you.)

Would we like the tax on gasoline adjusted based on the cost of living index? (I think so. Probably better than paying and paying and paying forever at the highest possible rate.)

Then there were all those school board people we never heard of. The one or two we knew (one of them is our neighbor) we voted for, the others were left blank. They are all running unopposed and unaffiliated, so asking for our vote is pro forma.

The lines were longer for parts of town where houses are closer together. Yay for living in the middle of nowhere.

The governor’s race should make interesting viewing. It was, last we heard, too close to call. Elections are my favorite contact sport, after clearance sale shopping.

IN A HALLOWEEN MOOD

Trick or Trick - It’s Halloween, and you just ran out of candy.


We live off the beaten path. Trick-or-treaters don’t come this way. Our street has too few houses to make it worth the effort — and the road is dark. We don’t even bother to buy candy for the holiday anymore.

When local kids, our kids, want to do “Trick of Treat,” they go into town where there is light, sidewalks, and Halloween decorations.

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In the name of saving electricity, there are no streetlights in this part of town. We aren’t really in town, except technically. City water pipes don’t come here. We have a fire house nearby in which some trucks live, but no firemen.

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Not that we have full-time firefighters. We have a fire chief who doubles as the chief of our tiny police department. It’s a quiet town. As in most small towns, volunteers carry the load.

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We haven’t had a serious fire in quite a while and hopefully, won’t. Now that we’ve had some rain, the danger of fire has dropped. Good.

Because Halloween is here – and we want all our little ghouls, ghosts, goblins, superheros and fairy princesses to be safe.

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ALMOST HALLOWEEN

All Hallows Night Poem

It’s almost here, the spookiest, funniest, silliest holiday of the year. Halloween is the perfect kid celebration. Dress up in weird costumes. Harass your neighbors until they give you candy. Decorate the house in ghoulies, ghosties and long-legged beasties. Not to mention things that go bump in the night!

Most of the pictures in the gallery are Garry’s and they are signed by him.