SUMMERTIME SUMMERTIME SUM SUM SUMMERTIME

Summertime! When all the leaves and trees are green … and the red bird sings, I’ll be blue …

Published on Jul 7, 2012

The Jamies were an American singing group
Single Released in 1958
Chart : Peaked at No.26 on The Billboard Hot 100 in 1958

There’s a long, interesting history of “Summertime” and its historic relationship to Fenway Park and the Boston Red Sox. Possibly the oldest tradition in baseball! 

Sherm Feller, who wrote Summertime, Summertime was an old pal of Garry’s as well as the public address announcer at Fenway Park for many years. He was known for playing the song regularly over the speakers at the park.

Read all about Sherm Feller and his song …

Summertime, Summertime Lyrics

It’s summertime summertime sum sum summertime
Summertime summertime sum sum summertime
Summertime summertime sum sum summertime
Summertime summertime sum sum summertime summertime…

Well shut them books and throw em away
Say goodbye to dull school days
So come on and change your ways
It’s summertime…

Well no more studying history
And no more reading geography
And no more dull geometry
Because it’s summertime

It’s time to head straight for them hills
It’s time to live and have some thrills
Come along and have a ball
A regular free-for-all

Well are you comin or are you ain’t
You slow-pokes are my one complaint
Hurry up before I faint
It’s summertime

Well I’m so happy that I could flip
Oh how I’d love to take a trip
I’m sorry teacher but zip your lip
Because it’s summertime

It’s time to head straight for them hills
It’s time to live and have some thrills
Come along and have a ball
A regular free for all

Well we’ll go swimmin every day
No time to work just time to play
If your folks complain just say,
It’s summertime

And every night we’ll have a dance
Cause what’s a vacation without romance
Oh man this jive has me in a trance
Because it’s summertime

It’s time to head straight for them hills
It’s time to live and have some thrills
Come along and have a ball A regular free for all
It’s summertime

It’s summertime summertime sum sum summertime
Summertime summertime sum sum summertime
Summertime summertime sum sum summertime
Summertime summertime sum sum summertime
Summertime

It’s summertime!

CONFESSIONS OF A PEN THIEF – GARRY ARMSTRONG

I could run for elective office if I so chose. Even in retirement, after more than 40 years as a TV and radio news reporter I’m sufficiently recognizable that I could put my name up for election. I don’t have a lot of skeletons in my closet. Certainly none scandalous enough to draw attention.

Nonetheless, I felt it was time to come clean about the addiction I have not been able to shed. I steal pens.

I am a pen thief.

My reputation precedes me into the offices of public officials, religious leaders, doctors, lawyers, business, and law enforcement. I am welcome with smiles and handshakes — but the pens are locked away.

My pen thievery is the stuff of legend, admired by icons like “Tip” O’Neill, the late Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives. “Tip” and I once swapped anecdotes about the quality of watches and pens on “The Hill”. He actually once double dared me.

Garry-With-TipONeill

Having swiped pens from Scotland Yard, the Vatican, Buckingham Palace, state houses, city halls, and other high-profile venues, I set my sites on the biggest of all: The Oval Office.

I’d already established a rapport with then-President Clinton. He knew and liked me. I had it planned. A one-on-one interview with no one else in the big room. I diverted the President’s attention and reached for one of his elegant pens — only to find him staring at me. Smiling.

“We know all about you, Garry”, President Clinton smiled cheerily.

Garry and Marilyn at President Clinton’s party on Martha’s Vineyard

Turns out the good pens had been stashed and replaced by cheap, discount ones that dried up after a few uses. I later found out some of my best political contacts — on both sides of the aisle in DC — had joined in a bi-partisan move to warn the President about the notorious pen thief from Boston.

Being a legend isn’t as easy as it looks.

WAITING WITH THE NEWS – A HEALTH ALERT UPDATE

The only time I read the newspaper is when I’m waiting for the doctor or dentist. Usually, I get headlines online and carefully avoid reading “hard news.”

I don’t want to know. I can’t fix what’s broken in the world. Knowing about it will depress me.

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Yesterday, I had a moderately long wait for the dentist. It was an emergency visit and I didn’t bring my Kindle. My bag is already stuffed, overloaded with camera equipment and everything else.

Garry always buys newspapers and he had brought two. Halfway through the second newspaper, I remembered why I don’t follow news. I caught up with everything I didn’t want to know.

The waiting experience was crowned by seeing the dentist.

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The good news? The antibiotics healed the infection in my gums and if I lay off the flossing, I should be fine. Other good news? My broken tooth was filled. I no longer have a big, jagged hole where my premolar ought to be. In fact, I still have the premolar, or what’s left of it. Even better news? The tooth can be fixed, made good as new, almost.

You’re waiting for the other shoe to drop, right? Wait for it …

$1200 for the crown. No insurance. Because health insurance doesn’t cover teeth, vision, or hearing. Eating, seeing, and hearing are cosmetic, not medical issues.

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Now that I know I’m not going to die from infection, I can relax. I can stop being cranky, snarky, and insomniac. Because all I need to worry about is money.

Footnote: The photographs have nothing to do with the post. I took them when we got back from the dentist. With the Pentax Q7, which was not having a good day. It took me an hour to figure out what was bothering it — and set it to rights. I felt obliged to use the pictures.

MAGIC IS EVERYWHERE – THREE QUOTES, DAY THREE

Nothing is certain anymore. Nothing. Chaos is king and magic is loose in the world. – Robert Heinlein, “Waldo”

I’m astonished how many people have either never read these two novellas, or read them and manged to miss the point.

If you haven’t read them, you really should, if you are any kind of science fiction fan. They are fundamental to the mythology of science fiction. The concepts Heinlein posits have become axiomatic to later writers.

"Waldo Astounding SF Aug 1942." Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia - Waldo Astounding SF Aug 1942

“Waldo Astounding SF Aug 1942.” Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia – Waldo Astounding SF Aug 1942

Many readers — I take this from the reviews I’ve read by people who say they have indeed read the two novellas — apparently don’t see a connection between the stories. They think they are in one volume “to fill up space.” Either they didn’t really read them or they are conceptually challenged, unable to connect two related ideas.

The point is that technology is a based on our belief it will work (see Clarke’s Three Laws). As long as we believe in it, it works, whatever “it” may be. If or when we stop believing, it won’t work. It is all magic. Science is incantation. Witchcraft codified.

When we lose faith in technology, magic becomes the new technology. The difference between one and the other is style, not substance. The stories’ plots are irrelevant. It is all concept.

The best science fiction is concept-driven. Characters and plot usually take a back seat. These two stories have stuck with me for a lifetime. Both are based on a single concept.

We believe in what works — and what works is what we believe.

CONSIDER STUPIDITY – THREE QUOTES, DAY TWO

For the second of my three quotes in three days, I present to you my all-time favorite quote. I use it as a signature line on my email. I try to remember it whenever I think someone is out to get me.

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. – Robert Hanlon

This quote has a long, rich history. Despite the attribution, no one can say exactly when or where it originated. Called Hanlon’s razor, it is an aphorism. It suggests a way to eliminate complicated explanations for a phenomenon when a simpler one is available. It suggests before looking for ill-intent, consider the possibility of stupidity.

Stupidity is common. It requires neither forethought nor planning. Anyone can be stupid. No special effort is needed. It is, therefore, the most likely explanation for actions. Why look for other motives? Go with simplicity.

72-Lily-Garden_36

Although the saying is officially named after Robert J. Hanlon, there are a variety of earlier sayings that convey the same idea dating back at least as far as Goethe in 1774.

Arthur C. Clarke’s Three Laws are considered closely related:

  1. When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.
  2. The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible.
  3. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

The third law, my other favorite, has been incorrectly attributed to many different writers, but it really does belong to Clarke. Really. No matter what else you may have heard. If I ever change my signature line, Clarke’s third law is a strong contender for the position.

PLANNING TO CELEBRATE

Just you wait . Come September, it will be 25 years of marriage. We are going to Cooperstown. We will do wild and crazy stuff. Visit the Baseball Hall of Fame. See Doubleday field. Take a lot of pictures.

September 2013

September 2013 – the last big party

The leaves should be turning, or at least beginning to turn. I certainly hope so. Maybe we’ll get married again … it would be the fourth time … and I have to remember to call the museum and see if they have someone who could perform a little ceremony. Garry would love getting married on Doubleday Field.

That’s as wild a party in which I can imagine wanting to participate. Maybe it’s because I’m chock full of antibiotics and dreading looking forward to getting that infected thing in my mouth fixed while wondering which overworked credit card can pay for it. Regardless, it’s not easy to get up a head of enthusiasm for serious partying these days.

I remember going to and giving parties when I was young. There was the requisite drinking, smoking, playing loud music. Eating brownies. Making gigantic pots of chili, enough to feed an unlimited number of people. And there were a lot of people.

I don’t remember events in detail because I was having the kind of good time that comes with too much drinking, smoking, overeating — and ultimately (or in my case, almost immediately) passing out. I slept through most of the high points of the best celebrations of my youth. I can claim I was there because I have witnesses … but I don’t remember much.

Did I have a huge amount of fun? I’m told I had a really good time. I have no reason to suspect duplicity on the part of those who have assured me it is true.

Today, I might go as far as a clumsy high-five with my husband, but have a party? You mean … cook for a lot of people, then clean up the mess? He’s limping. I’m just limp. I think will put a pin in that. We’ll have that big party later. Much later.

WHISTLING AND FISHING IN HEAVEN

As playlists go, this is short, but it says a lot. Not everyone has heard of John Prine, but he wrote many songs other people sing, and he sang a lot of them himself on various records, most of which I owned on vinyl. He has always been a favorite of mine, somehow cheering me up when I’m blue. So, whenever WordPress prompts for a playlist, he’s my go-to guy.

And lo and behold, there’s a new CD collection of his work available … just $10, double CD. I ordered it. Of course.

John Prine sings about life. He always had a sense of humor, too. He wrote great, witty lyrics, and singable melodies. What more do you need? Because to me, that’s music.

A sentiment … several sentiments … to which I can really relate. John Prine. Singing one of  my favorites. Musical philosophy.

The meaning of life according to John Prine. He sums it up for me. Thanks John!

Finally, a musical look at aging. Talk about summing it up. Tom Paxton was always a favorite. Which shows my age as much as my shining silver hair.

SHARING MY WORLD AND MAYBE ANOTHER

SHARE YOUR WORLD – 2015 WEEK #25

What did you or did not like about the first apartment you ever rented?

We could afford it, which at the time, was not a “given.” It was walking distance to the university. Good for me because I didn’t drive yet.

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Good for the husband because he needed the exercise. It was a corner apartment, so it had excellent cross ventilation. Finally, it was at the end of the corridor, so it was quieter than apartments nearer the elevator.

On the negative side, it had no sound-proofing, so we could hear our upstairs neighbor snoring as if he were in the room with us.

What kind of art is your favorite? Why?

I can’t answer that. I love books, movies, paintings. Sculpture.

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And, of course, photography.

BEDROOM WEST 6

I like old stuff, new stuff, and in between stuff. My taste defines eclectic.

How many siblings do you have? What’s your birth order?

I’m the middle kid. My brother was 4 years older than me and my sister is five years younger.

1952

1952. My sister wasn’t born yet.

My brother died 7 years ago of pancreatic cancer. My sister disappeared into the world of drugs decades before.

TimeTravelComplete this sentence:  I’m dreaming of a white …. (and no you can’t use Christmas as your answer) …

I’m dreaming of a giant white space ship which is on its way to take us to a better world.

Or maybe a strange white swirling light which is a wormhole into a time tunnel and I can go traveling to whenever I want to go. Woo hoo!