SOMETHING WILL HAPPEN

When Garry came into the bedroom, I was staring at the radio. Garry takes his hearing aids off at night, so we have bedtime conversations at high volume. Shouting, really.

BEDROOM SOUTH 7

“Why are you staring at the radio?”

“I’m trying to figure out if it’s on. Oh, it just started to make noise. It’s on.”

“But why are you staring at it?”

“I thought if I stared at it for a while, it would start to play. Or not. One way or the other, I would find out what the red light means.”

“What red light, and why are you staring at it? How will staring at it help?”

“That’s how I figure things out. It didn’t come with instructions.”

Pause. “Have you taken any drugs?”

“No. See, there’s the red light. I didn’t if know the red light means the CD player is on or off. I had to wait to see if it started playing. I was pretty sure a blinking red light means pause, but I wasn’t sure what a steady red light means. I waited when there was no light. Nothing happened. So I tried it the other way. Now it’s making noise. Therefore, the red light means it’s on. It’s slow getting started.”

radio and coffee cup plastic BW

I wasn’t trying to be funny, but Garry started to laugh and couldn’t stop. “That’s the sort of thing I would do,” he said,

“Well, how else would I know what the red light means?”

He laughed some more.

Garry thinks I know a lot of stuff I don’t really know, especially about technical issues. I push buttons. If staring (and waiting) doesn’t fix what’s broken, I push another button. Or push the same button again. Or hold the button for a couple of seconds and see if it does something different.

While I’m waiting, I watch. Intently. Maybe I’ll get a message. Isn’t this how everyone fixes stuff? I used to look things up in the manual, but since no one supplies a manual anymore, it’s more art than science.

My husband finds this hilarious.

I spend a lot of time staring at computers, waiting for something — anything — to happen. Hoping an idea will occur to me or for the system to reboot. To see if a blue screen will recur, or the diagnostic will tell me there’s no problem, even though I’m sure there is. For a message.

I must be doing something right. Beethoven is playing on the CD player/radio. And most of the time, the computers work.

THE REDIRECT SCRIPT

Referring to the little script that will redirect your “new post” interface back to the “classic” version as opposed to the “improved posting experience” that is in no way an improvement — it works.

This morning, for the first time since I selected “keep the classic interface” back when WordPress first tried to foist this crap software on us, they tried to send me to the new version instead of the old. I guess they finally cleared out the default I had set. So the new one flashed for half a second on the screen and the script intercepted it and I was back where I want to be.

For anyone still battling with the blockheads of WordPress, I strongly suggest you install the redirect into your browser. It will let you continue to blog the way you always have. It’s not going to solve the problem forever because WordPress is never going to give up.

The blogging platform that is snatching defeat from the jaws of victory

The blogging platform which is snatching defeat from the jaws of victory

Microsoft has demonstrated why this is a terrible idea, that forcing users to “do it” your way when they don’t want to, not only doesn’t work, but can transform your customers into someone else’s customers.

Microsoft has generated a lot of business for Apple and Linux while trying to convince us that Windows 8 isn’t garbage. WordPress thinks they can do the same, but get different results.

It’s marketing 101 and obviously, they don’t get it. They cannot force their will on people. Not here, not now, not in 2015 on the Internet. All they are doing is getting people to rethink if they want to continue blogging while searching for other platforms.

Please, visit How To Force A Redirect To The Classic WordPress.com Editor Interface on DiaryofDennis.com. It works. And when it is working, you can work, too. At least until they figure out another way to blow us out of the water.

HOW TO FORCE A REDIRECT TO THE CLASSIC WORDPRESS EDITOR INTERFACE

Marilyn Armstrong:

If you are struggling with the horrible new interface WordPress is forcing on you, here’s a workaround. It’s a reblog. Pass it along!

Originally posted on Diary of Dennis:

classic editor wordpress

The Solution To Use The Classic Editor

If you are blogger at wordpress.com, this post here will help you to solve a big problem. As you have noticed, the decision makers at WordPress want to force you to use the recent new editor interface that is purely designed for mobile devices and for users who only create short-form content. This is of course a pain if you are desktop user and if you like to create long-form content as well. In this post you will learn how to get back to the classic editor permanently.

In the new editor form, we had a link back to the classic editor but that link is now gone too. WordPress does not have the intention to give us the link back as you can read here in the forums. If you go through this huge forum thread, you will find out…

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WHAT? ANOTHER THEME CHANGE? GOOD GRIEF, WHY CAN’T YOU MAKE UP YOUR MIND ALREADY?

I really liked the way Twenty Fifteen looked, especially the transparent left sidebar. It was elegant. Unfortunately, the issues I noticed when I started using it only became more intrusive over the weeks.

  • Slow loading. It not only loaded slowly, it suffered from blackouts, sometimes so long, I wondered if it was gone for good.
  • Text handling sucked. Bullets, block quotes, numbering? All useless. Would not align with the main text.
  • Font size. Everything looked tiny on the dashboard, huge on the display.
  • Spacing. Lots of glitches in spacing. That’s a problem with WordPress in general since they decided that how things look is more important than how they work, but much worse in Twenty Fifteen than anything else I’ve used. I like white space as much (or more) than most people, but not quite that much. Lots of space left at the end of each post and no way to remove it.
  • Headers were disproportionately large compared to text. It looked ugly.
  • Formats were weird. Twenty Fifteen offers a wealth of post formats, but most of them don’t work. They display poorly, size badly, and are unstable. I stopped using everything except “standard.”

It felt fragile, as if it was going to blow up any minute. When I changed the “header image,” really sidebar pictures, the original solid blue would show, which means the theme doesn’t clean out the previous item, just puts another layer on top of it. That’s a lot of stuff for a theme to deal with. No wonder it was so slow.

wilson2

This is Wilson. It looks a lot like Twenty Fifteen, but without the transparent graphical sidebar. It doesn’t allow a header picture, just a small logo graphic over the blog title. I decided I could live with it. Serendipity is graphics-heavy anyway.

This — presumably — gives me most of what I want and doesn’t require I completely redesign everything. I haven’t tested all its functions yet. There may well be glitches I haven’t encountered.

At least I like the way it’s shaped, how it presents photographs. It doesn’t have a lot of bells and whistles, but maybe that’s just as well since the bells and whistles seem to be a minus rather than a plus.

I want something that has good navigation in a left sidebar, gives pictures room to breathe. Handles text at least as well as early versions of Word Star (for you senior geeks, a blast from the past). Understands the concept of left alignment, and offers a balanced white-space-to-text ratio.

I’m getting weary of trying to find a theme the looks good and isn’t full of bugs. Let’s hope this one fits the bill. I’ll get back to you on this.

WHAT HAPPENED?

Around 3 this afternoon, something happened.

I know when it happened because the big clock radio on the end table started blinking and began counting from noon, which is what it does when it loses power for as much as a nanosecond. I didn’t notice for hours because the cold drink cup was blocking my view of its screen. It’s an angle thing.

Philco Clock Radio CD

Hours later, I noticed my computer’s battery was low. It shouldn’t have been because it’s plugged in. So, I looked down and saw the big surge protector into which everything is plugged, was off. I turned it on.

At some subsequent point in time, I searched for a saved email (in Gmail) which contained information I needed. It was missing. I checked in other folders, in case it was misfiled. That was when I realized every email I ever sent myself and saved in labeled folders, was gone. The folders weren’t empty. Email from anyone who wasn’t me was still there.

Only emails in folders were affected. Only emails addressed to me, from me, were deleted. The kind of thing I couldn’t do intentionally if my life depended on it. I’m not sure it’s possible to do it on purpose. Supposedly putting emails in labeled folders protects them from exactly this kind of disaster.

Lucky me, they hadn’t vanished entirely but had been moved to the trash.

For the past  seven hours, I’ve been sifting through trashed emails, nicely blended with actual trash. I have to find my saved data, contacts. Conversations with authors, friends, utilities, banks, bloggers … everything I’ve done, ordered, negotiated. All the stuff thought I had backed up by saving the emails.

alienware side view computer

How could a global delete from all folders and sub-folders occur while leaving my inbox untouched? Yet it happened. Did one of the dogs step on the surge protector and turn it off? Did that somehow trigger a global delete of emails addressed to me, from me? How? What else happened that I haven’t yet discovered?

I’m tired. I’ve got a headache. I can’t empty my real email trash until I’m sure I’ve retrieved all the stuff that matters. Thousands of emails are sitting in the trash folder awaiting my attention. I’ve restored a couple of hundred, but haven’t looked at the rest. It’s overwhelming.

What happened? Anyone have a clue? I’m all ears.

TABLETS. THE NON-SOLUTION TO FUTURE COMPUTING

I always wondered, when I wrote about tablets and computers, if lacking an iPad was the problem. I have Android tablets, windows tablets. A variety of Kindles. But maybe all these could not show me how tablets could rock my world, make me get rid of all my laptops and desktops. I figured that must be the key — because while I like my tablets, I would never use one for real work.

Well. I got an iPad. And just to round out my tablet experience, I unexpectedly fell into a Kindle Fire HD 8.9, the big dog of Kindles.

And now, with my bona fides in order, it’s time to say it again. Because now, more than ever, the truth is incontrovertible. A tablet can’t replace your laptop or desktop unless the only thing for which you use a computer is email and social media … and even then, it might be a bit tricky.

Getting an iPad

The lightweight laptop I used for simple tasks died. Again. A software super-glitch involving multiple areas of the system. The laptop isn’t old, hasn’t seen heavy use, but has required two reloads and now wants a third. I was unwilling to put more money into a machine which clearly has a problem. Computers should not eat operating systems. I just don’t know what the problem is, but it was a cheap laptop. Time to replace it.

Kindle and iPad

What to do? I needed something on which I can play audiobooks and which will access at least two, preferably three, Audible accounts — something Kindles cannot do. It needed to be light, highly portable, able to do basic Internet stuff, make minor corrections on my blog. Check email. Maybe play some music or a movie once in a while. I found a really good deal on an iPad 3. Between my credits with Amazon and the reduced cost of an older model, it came into my life for under $300, making it my least costly and (I assumed) most elegant computing solution.

I’ve had friends extolling the virtues of the iPad for years. So I figured I’d get this thing. It would leap from its box, embrace me. Configure itself (like the Kindle does), then clean the house, shovel the roof, and cook dinner.

Not exactly. Hours of configuring later (and the addition of Chrome as a browser), it began to behave like it should.

I still prefer the Kindle. It’s faster, requires much less configuring. Except for that pesky problem with Audible access, which you’d think Amazon would solve since they own Audible. But never mind. Many of the same people who had been telling me that an iPad was going to solve my problems (and those of the world) were now emailing me, reminding me it’s “just a tablet, not a computer.” Funny. That’s not what they said before I got one.

Tablet sales have slowed, not because tablets aren’t fun or don’t have a place in our lives, but because everyone has one, or two, or three. And because, as it turns out, tablets do what they do, which isn’t everything.

I remember reading articles how tablets would replace laptops and desktops. This was based on a surge in tablet sales and a simultaneous slowdown of computer sales. Apparently no one who wrote those articles considered that people buying tablets didn’t have them. When everyone had one, tablet sales would level off. Many folks had recently invested in desktop and laptop computers and didn’t need another one. And of course, there was Windows 8 which caused a lot of folks to not want to buy a computer, including me.

Today, I am set for tablets. Two Kindles (big and little) and an iPad. My fantastic Alienware laptop does the heavy lifting and I still have a big desktop in my office.

The writers of those articles were, quite simply, lying. None of them wrote their articles on tablets. I don’t know who paid them off, but everyone who’s ever used a tablet knows it cannot replace a full-size computer or laptop. To say otherwise is intentional misrepresentation.

All the friends who told me how great their iPads are failed to mention any of its limitations until I already owned one. Is this the official “dirty little secret” of the iPad fan club? I had to become a member of the club before I could have the rest of the story?

I’ve made peace with my iPad, but it will never be my favorite device or even my favorite tablet. I prefer my Kindles and the big, 8.9″ Kindle is the top dog. Not the most portable among its brethren, but for aging eyes, it’s a life-saver. I can read again!!

There’s room in our lives for many different devices. And operating systems.

One size does not fit all. You can’t replace everything with one thing. There’s no reason you should. It’s still a (sort of) free country.