THE END OF THE ROAD FOR WINDOWS AND ME

Summary: Windows 10 will build in standards-based two-factor authentication to every device, effectively neutering most phishing attacks and password database breaches. The company also announced new features aimed at securing corporate machines from malware attacks and data leaks.

screenshot-www.zdnet.com 2014-10-23 12-39-55

The summary of Ed Bott’s column on the upcoming Windows 10 appalled me. Sickened me. Frightened me. The rest of the article confirmed my worst fears. I’m walking the final piece of road with Microsoft. The end of the road for me and Windows.

IN WITH THE NEW

The handwriting has been on my wall for a while.

Since April, my primary computer has been my Dell XPS 15 laptop. It has a fast motherboard, 8 GB RAM, 750 GB at 7500 HD, a backlit keyboard, high def monitor, a DVD that plays Blu-Ray, and a 9-cell battery. It weighs like a cannonball.

I use a lap desk with two fans to cool it. I treat it well, keep it clean. It’s never been dropped.

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM?

Glad you asked. The graphics card is inadequate. It’s a card with both sound and graphics on it, so I can’t listen to anything while I work in Photoshop. And even so, it locks. It used to recover and knowing the source of the problem, (insufficient video RAM), I rebooted frequently. Mostly, it was okay. Lately, it has stopped recovering. It goes down, stays down. Hard crashes and blue screens of death.

Last week, it gave me a black screen — fatal error — which told me it did not recognize its power source. It was plugged into an AC outlet, so I suspect the battery is starting to go.

For months now, it has refused to install Microsoft updates, except antivirus. I figured I didn’t really need the updates, but I’d have to be stupid to not see the warnings. My faithful laptop is getting tired. Some day soon, it’s going to quit.

SO WHAT DID YOU ORDER? TELL ALL, PLEASE!

Possibly for the first time, I got enough computer to do what I need to do. It’s a gaming laptop, Alienware 14. It has 16 gigs of RAM, a dedicated 2 gig video card. DVD reader/writer. High definition graphics. Heavier than I’d like at 6 pounds, but nothing lighter had all the features I want.

Alienware14-laptops

It looks like my new computer will be my last Windows machine. It’s the most powerful Alienware computer I could configure — based on Windows 7. It had better last a long time because I’ve tried using Windows 8 on Microsoft’s tablets (1 running RT and the other running Windows 8.1). I’ve also put in some time using my friend’s Windows 8.1 desktop.

I hated it. From Mr. Bott’s description, the worst of the problems of Windows 8 will become “the features” of Windows 10 or whatever they decide to call it. This is not a new approach in the high-tech world, mind you. It’s a classic, the “smoke and mirrors” approach.

“OH NO, that isn’t a bug … IT’S A FEATURE!”

You heard me right. It isn’t that Microsoft has made it impossible to run non-Microsoft products on that computer you bought. They are protecting you from the big, bad, world. Nor are they are providing you with a viable alternative to the way you used to work. They are requiring you play in their ballpark. A tiny world that has limited tools and applications to do whatever it is you do. If you want to do other things and they don’t have what you need? Gee … I guess that’s too bad. Microsoft figures it can set the rules. They own you. All you zombies will march in step and pay them money for the privilege.

Not this zombie. And not a whole lot of my fellow zombies. Mind you I am no great fan of Mac, either. I have a heavy investment in windows-based software, which is how come I have put up with all this crap so far … but there is a line over which you cannot push me. You cannot tell me I have to live in your universe to the exclusion of all others “for my own safety.” If my mother couldn’t do it, Microsoft definitely cannot.

No matter what you believe, it’s MY world. MY computer. MY money. MY investment, work, effort, and creativity. You will not force me to do it your way. This is not happening. Thanks for warning me, though. I’ll start saving now for the huge investment I will have to make in the future to change to a different system. And shame on all you tech authors for trying to sell this as a good thing. For not saying that the obvious end result of this shill game is the end of freedom of choice for anyone who buys into Microsoft’s new operating systems.

And so, Mr. Bott, you who wrote this article for ZDnet — Whatever happened to your journalistic ethics? Did they pay you to dump them or merely make it clear you have to tow the party line or else? I can’t believe you actually believe the drivel you’re writing. When I started in the high-tech biz as a writer, we limited the shilling for sponsored products to the “new products” columns and didn’t feature the lies. We were encouraged to use judgment and commonsense when writing lead articles because we still thought our subscribers were the people to whom we answered.

I’m embarrassed to be a member of the same profession. Ashamed. You should be too.


In conjunction with today’s Daily Prompt – Ready, Set, Done – free writing exercise. I think this may have taken more than 10 minutes (but not much more) and it is I have to say.

IN WITH THE NEW

The handwriting has been on my wall for a while.

Since April, my primary computer has been my Dell XPS 15 laptop. It has a fast motherboard, 8 GB RAM, 750 GB at 7500 HD, a backlit keyboard, high def monitor, a DVD that plays Blu-Ray, and a 9-cell battery. It weighs like a cannonball.

I use a lap desk with two fans to cool it. I treat it well, keep it clean. It’s never been dropped.

WHAT’S THE PROBLEM?

Glad you asked. The graphics card is inadequate. It’s a card with both sound and graphics on it, so I can’t listen to anything while I work in Photoshop. And even so, it locks. It used to recover and knowing the source of the problem, (insufficient video RAM), I rebooted frequently. Mostly, it was okay. Lately, it has stopped recovering. It goes down, stays down. Hard crashes and blue screens of death.

Alienware14-laptops

Last week, it gave me a black screen — fatal error — which told me it did not recognize its power source. It was plugged into an AC outlet, so I suspect the battery is starting to go.

For months now, it has refused to install Microsoft updates, except antivirus. I figured I didn’t really need the updates, but I’d have to be stupid to not see the warnings. My faithful laptop is getting tired. Some day soon, it’s going to quit.

I bought this computer in March 2012. It was refurbished, a year old when I got it. Buying refurbished let me buy more computer. I had gotten serious about blogging. Also, recently out of the hospital. I had (have) a desktop, but I needed a laptop. This was top of the line then, and if you look at the specs, it is still better than 90% of the new computers on the market … except it has grown old. For two and a half years, this laptop has taken whatever I threw at it without (much) complaint. What it did in the year before I got it, I have no way of knowing except that it had some mileage on it.

I could wait until it dies. Probably in the middle of writing a post. Not a smart move, especially considering the issues swirling around Microsoft. Namely, Windows 8. I hate Windows 8.

BUT WHY DON’T YOU BUY A MAC?

Alienware14-keyboard

With all of its quirks, Microsoft never screwed me over the way Apple did. Every expensive Apple computer I bought was obsolete mere weeks after buying it. Apple always assured me the new machine would be upgradeable. They lied. In 1999, they did it again. I had barely had time to set up the new system before Apple made it obsolete.

“This is,” I said aloud, “the last time Apple is going to screw me.”

I donated the Apple to my alma mater. I bought the most powerful Windows 98 PC I could afford, which — with upgrades — ran flawlessly for 6 years. I never bought another Macintosh product until an iPhone snuck into my world a year ago.

I want nothing to do with Macs. I don’t like the inaccessibility of the operating system or the hardware. I don’t find it intuitive. I find it confusing and annoying. I want a PC, thank you. But not Windows 8. From what I’m hearing, I don’t want the upcoming Windows 10, either.

BUY NOW OR DIE LATER

Which put me into a bind. Windows 7 machines are disappearing. Even a few weeks ago, there were more choices. Despite the other issues we have, I need a new laptop. This is what credit is for … and that’s why I buy from Dell. Because when no one else would give me credit, they did.

alienware-back

SO WHAT DID YOU ORDER? TELL ALL, PLEASE!

Possibly for the first time, I got enough computer to do what I need to do. It’s a gaming laptop, Alienware 14. It has 16 gigs of RAM, a dedicated 2 gig video card. DVD reader/writer. High definition graphics. Heavier than I’d like at 6 pounds, but nothing lighter had all the features I want.

Here are the specs for my fellow geeks:

  • 4th Gen Intel Core i7-4710MQ processor (6MB Cache, up to 3.5GHz w/ Turbo Boost)
  • 14.0 inch WLED FHD (1920 x 1080) IPS Anti-Glare Display
  • 16GB Dual Channel DDR3L 1600MHz (2x8GB)
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 765M with 2GB GDDR5
  • Intel 802.11n/ac Wireless and Bluetooth 4.0 driver
  • 1TB 5400RPM SATA 6Gb/s
  • Windows 7 Professional 64 bit Service Pack 1, English, w/Media
  • Optical Drive : Slot-Loading 8x SuperMulti Drive (DVD/R/RW)
  • Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 @ 5GHz + Bluetooth 4.0
  • Backlit English Keyboard
  • US 110V Power Cord
  • Battery : Primary 6-cell 69W/HR
  • Power Supply : Alienware 150W AC Adapter
  • Alienware 14 Silver Anodized Aluminum

It won’t be here till the beginning of November, but I think I’m good until then. I sure hope so!

Oh, they threw in a free 7″ Android tablet. I don’t know what I’ll do with it, but I guess I’ll figure it out. And a $150 gift card. For accessories.

NEED TO KNOW (NCIS, 2012) AND MY PACEMAKER

EPISODE: Need to Know (2012) – SHORT SYNOPSIS:

Alan Katzenbach, a lawyer, waits for Gibbs with his client, a chief petty officer named Leland Wiley. Wiley was busted for drugs and wants to trade his info — which he says is about national security. It concerns Agah Bayar, the arms dealer. Gibbs is interested. Wiley comes over to talk, but grabs his heart and drops to the ground.

ncis-need-to-know

Gibbs comes for the update from Ducky. Turns out, Wiley had top security clearance and his workstation is locked down. They haven’t been able to connect him to Bayar yet.

Abby calls Gibbs to the lab. She tells him Wiley’s pacemaker was linked into a computer to monitor it. Someone hacked in and jacked his heart rate up to 400 beats per minute.

“Somebody murdered Wiley by remote control,” she says.


What does this have to do with me?

Well, glad you asked. This episode so intrigued the heart surgery team at Beth Israel Deaconess in Boston (where I had all that heart surgery last March), that they decided to find out if it really could be done. One of the people that performed the experiment was my surgeon.

They did it. My surgeon did point out as far as they could tell, to actually hack a pacemaker you had to be no more than a couple of feet from it. Nonetheless, they made the manufacturer change the programming.

In theory, nobody can hack my pacemaker.

I find this comforting. Garry finds it disturbing and I suppose I can see where he’s coming from. He doesn’t like thinking about the mechanical and electronic stuff that keeps me alive. It would creep me out too, but I’m a bit of a geek.

RBB-pacemaker

I find the technology sufficiently interesting to overcome its inherent creepiness. It is creepy. However, it doesn’t matter. No matter how I feel about it, I’ve got this thing in my chest. It keeps my heart beating. If my heart beat on its own, I wouldn’t need the pacemaker.

Every time I go for a pacemaker checkup, they use a little machine and briefly stop the pacemaker to see if my heart will beat without it. My heart stops beating. Talk about creepy. It is a very unpleasant — and indescribable — sensation. Anyone with a pacemaker knows what I mean.

The blue tooth remote functions still work. They are (in theory) more secure than they were a couple of years ago, before the NCIS episode aired and the guys got curious about it. Remote functionality is important. After all, I might need a tune-up. Blue tooth lets my doctor access my pacemaker from … how far? I don’t actually know. A considerable distance, whatever that is.

Garry — again — doesn’t want to know about it. I pointed out if someone murders me, this is potentially important evidence. He would still rather not think about it.

So there we are. Too creepy?

I can feel my pacemaker. It sits on my left shoulder. The outline is visible. I can feel the wires, the connections through my skin. I find it impossible to ignore. I might as well find it interesting. It’s part of me, after all.

FOLLOW-UP: WORDPRESS CAME THROUGH!

I have gotten so used to customer disservice, it always surprises me when they live up to their promises.

Shortly after I posted 175,000 HITS AND A SERIOUS CHAT WITH WORD PRESS, my site became unavailable. WordPress said they were doing “routine server maintenance.”

wordpress1There’s nothing routine about having my site down in the middle of a Tuesday. Moreover, I found test files created by someone named Jason — coincidentally the name of the rep with whom I chatted at length yesterday — in my trash. When I tried to restore one (I’m nosy), it vanished. Poof. A test file. That is not part of regular maintenance. They had me offline four times for more than an hour. When I was back, my Add Media function was working the way it used to, more or less.

It doesn’t look the same. The graphical interface is new, but I can scroll and the keyword search brings up all or most of my pictures.

I would prefer the thumbnails to display data — file name, date, and maybe key words? But I’m delighted to be able to find pictures again.  I use a lot of pictures, not only as photographic posts, but as illustrations in stuff I write. Which is one reason it’s so important I be able to use stored images.

There’s a second, even more important, reason. I use 3 computers regularly and a tablet occasionally. I do not have access to all my photos on each machine. The only photographic central repository is Serendipity’s media library on WordPress.

This is why I was willing to pay for the premium package. It is customization plus bumped up storage and a domain. Other benefits include custom fonts and colors. I can customize any theme. I’ve never found a premium theme I like well enough to buy. I am too fond of changing my theme, sometimes just tweaking it, often switching templates. On a whim.

Writing is my vocation, but graphics are — always were — my hobby. To overuse an analogy, writing is dinner. Graphics are dessert. Being able to design my site, play with photos, fonts, widgets, headers — makes my day. My week.

WordPress came through. They couldn’t and probably won’t roll back the software changes, many of which I believe are misguided. They traded functionality for a prettier interface. In software, that’s always a bad trade. But I’m glad to get back most of the functionality I lost.

It’s possible my site was actually broken and needed repair. That it wasn’t software changes at the root of the problem, but something on my site had gone wrong. I’ll probably never know, but it’s okay. As long as it works, I’m happy.

I’ve invested more effort into launching and maintaining this website than I put into writing my book. I’ve refined its look, upgraded my skills as a writer and photographer. When I went to have my heart remodeled in March, I was as concerned this site be cared for as I was about the house or the bills. Serendipity has become central to my life. I would hate to lose it.

It keeps my brain from going soft by challenging me to write, take pictures, produce something creative. Every day, even when I’m tired, busy, or not feeling well. When you stop working a regular job, having something that forces you to think, create is important to good mental health. It’s a critical component of mine.

Thank you WordPress. You came through.

Thank you Jason. You kept your word.

A bit of my faith in the world has been restored. I needed that.

175,000 HITS AND A SERIOUS CHAT WITH WORD PRESS

Today I discovered that the new format for inserting media into a post has eliminated all the search tools that worked. If you are a photographer, this is disastrous. Those of you who work with pictures will see what I mean as soon as you try to use this “new, improved” version of the software.

INSERT MEDIA PAGE

It took me an hour today to find a photograph in my library. You cannot insert directly from the media library. All you can do is look around and see what’s there. It is dead storage. The alternative is uploading every picture and not re-using the pictures stored in your library. In which case, what’s the point of the library at all?

stats 175,000+

How ironic that yesterday I crossed the threshold and now have more than 175,000 hits.

For all practical purposes, WordPress is saying I’ve outgrown them. I’ve invested a huge amount of time and effort into this site and have no interest in moving. I think I’d rather give up blogging altogether. When a hobby becomes work and the fun goes away, what’s the point?

Here’s the conversation. Make of it what you will. I have trimmed it, but it’s still long. I dumped most of the repetitive stuff and cleaned it up for readability.


Marilyn – The new format for media (pictures) does not let me find pictures in my media library. I have 5200 photographs. When inserting media, even if I know the name of the picture, the date, the post in which it was used, I still can’t bring it up. The search option in “insert media” are non-existent. My only choice would be re-importing each image, not reusing them. Which negates the value of the library.

Jason – Hi there, I’m sorry. I was trying to read through everything. Give me just a minute. OK, I’m happy to help you with this.

Marilyn – There is no way now to find and insert pictures from my library. You have eliminated ALL of the search functions except the search box and it doesn’t work by date, doesn’t recognize the words, finds like five or six pictures out of hundreds. You’ve eliminated scrolling, so I’m effectively unable to use my media library at all. Exactly what was your goal?

Jason – I see what you mean about not being able to sort images in the media inserter.

Marilyn – It is useless for a photographer.

Jason – If you are finding you have outgrown the free hosted version of WordPress.com, you might consider looking at a self-hosted installation. There are plug-ins which you can install on self-hosted installations that are specifically designed to add search capabilities in the media insert section.

Marilyn – So you are telling me that I cannot access the files in my library — for which I pay a premium — and that the library is essentially useless?

Jason – No, I’m just trying to offer you additional solutions since you do not find the media insert search useful.

Marilyn – If I’m going to do that, I will dump WordPress. If I have to start over, I don’t need you. I can do that anywhere. I’m already paying you, why continue since you’ve made the previously useful tools worthless? It worked fine until yesterday. You changed it . And ruined it. Was this so that I would pay more money? If so, you miscalculated.

Jason – WordPress.com and WordPress.org are two different services, and I’m only associated to WordPress.com.

Marilyn – The entire reason for my being on WordPress was that you had the tools and I didn’t have to self-host.

Jason – May I ask a question?

Marilyn – Sure, ask away.

Jason – First, this is an actual question because I do want to help. Is the issue that you no longer have access to images by date, or does it have more to do with the search function not working well for you?

Marilyn – There is no search function on insert. Just a search box. You eliminated it everything else.

Jason – OK, now we are getting somewhere. I was under the impression it just wasn’t functioning as you expected. I apologize.

Marilyn – I knew the date the picture was used, its name, the post it was in. I still could not reuse it in a new post.

Jason – OK, that should not be the case. Most definitely. Give me one minute to take a look at a couple of the settings on your blog.

Marilyn – You have to open Add Post, then Add Media. There’s a search box and that’s it.

Jason – I’m looking through everything for you.

Marilyn – No date search. No search by post. No keywords search. All my media are jpg so that’s meaningless. And when things come up, there are no titles, no information, no data.

Jason – This is all very helpful information. The search does work by searching the title of the image. When you select an image, the details pertaining to that image appear on the right of the pop-up window (title, etc).

Marilyn – That’s assuming it gets found at all. And this information is not available in the search results, only if you actually click on the image. Otherwise, it’s just a thumbnail with pieces missing. Just bring back the tools that worked. Or make it possible to grab pictures from the library and insert them into post. Right now, the library is dead storage.

Jason – This was a recent update. I will relay this to the team right now. I can’t give you an ETA on when they will make changes, but I can promise that the issue will be brought up.

Marilyn – The whole point of paying for storage is you can use the stuff in storage. If I can’t use it, I’m paying for nothing. It’s like having a storage unit, but no key to get in. How do you make changes like this without opening a dialog with the people affected?

Jason – I don’t think there is a quick solution I can offer you. I apologize for this, but I will elevate this to our development team. I’m sorry I can’t offer an instant solution, but I will submit this ticket. Hopefully the developers can come up with something that provides the information you are looking for with your images. I hope that you understand only through constructive feedback can we continue to make WordPress.com a better environment for our users. Is there anything I can help you with regarding the services we do have available? I will submit the issue regarding the Media Insert function as soon as I am off this ticket. I will pass the feedback on to the developers. I hope you do give us a little time to resolve this issue, but understand if your business can’t wait. I would recommend taking a look at a self-hosted installation of WordPress. It would allow you to directly transfer your existing site to another host and not lose data. You can find information here: http://en.support.wordpress.com/moving-a-blog/#moving-to-wordpress-org

NOTE: I guess he didn’t believe I’m not a business.

Marilyn – I do not want to self-host. I am not a commercial site. This is supposed to be fun, a hobby. Not a job.

Jason – I am support dedicated to non-commercial bloggers. That said, I will pass your concerns on. If there is nothing else I can help you with, I will get this ticket created.

TECH SUPPORT – WHERE “BAD” IS THE NEW “GOOD”

Bad customer and technical support is the new good. You only think it’s bad. The problem is your attitude. Or so they’d have you think.

YOU CAN RUN, BUT YOU CAN’T HIDE

Death cust servAll the big technology companies are working hard to save a few bucks. The competition is fierce. Every penny counts. Since executives won’t accept lower pay nor will stockholders accept lower returns, it’s customers who fill the cost-cutting gap.

In the race to be the cheapest, tech companies stopped including chargers with devices. No manuals. No system software. No reinstallation software. Short power cords that don’t go from an outlet to a desktop. No connector for printers, speakers or whatever. Everything you need to finish setting up costs extra.

Customer service was the first thing to go. They hired people who don’t know anything, don’t understand or speak English. For all I know, they don’t understand or speak Spanish either. They aren’t trained, don’t know the products. And since manufacturers no longer include documentation, you don’t have the option of taking care of it yourself.

No company — not cameras, computers or software — includes documentation. I became obsolete years ago when the industry decided no one reads the manuals. So they fired the tech writers, put some generated information in an online PDF. They figured customer service techs would handle the fallout. But they don’t. Many of us would be happy to fix minor glitches but have no alternative to spending our time on the phone, frustrated and angry.

THE PLAN IN ACTION

You can’t say they didn’t have a plan. The big corporations indeed had a plan. A bad one.Customer Service waiting

It was so bad, it was immediately adopted by everyone. Globally.

It’s not a Microsoft problem, a Dell problem, or any company’s individual problem, though some are more awful than others and a few are notorious. It’s a cross-industry problem, affecting virtually every organization in this country.

Bad is the new good. Because good is remarkable.

WOULD IT KILL THEM TO INCLUDE A MANUAL?

CustServCartoon In every industry, business, service — service support stinks. It doesn’t matter where you go. You’ll get the same lousy service. It’s the great leveler.

Sometimes, you get lucky. The guy or gal you connect with actually knows the product and you think “Wow, that wasn’t bad! Maybe it’s improving.” The next time, it’s the same old, same old.

AMAZON – THE BRIGHT SPOT

There is a bright spot. Amazon and Audible (a subsidiary of Amazon) still have terrific customer service. That could change any time on the whim of a company exec, but for now, it’s great.

It’s no accident I shop through Amazon. They offer really good service. You have a problem, they go out of their way to make it right. You need to return something? They don’t question you, make you jump through hoops.

I wish I could buy everything from them.

FOR ONE CENT PLAIN

I got an email from AT&T. It was alarming. I was overdue on my bill! They were going to report me to collection agencies, send it to all those companies that decide whether or not you deserve to have a credit card or a mortgage.

I was surprised because I paid the bill. On time. Online. I know I did.

Obverse side of a 1990 issued US Penny. Pictur...

So, after resetting my password — it doesn’t matter how many times I set my password … the next time I go to AT&T’s website, I will have to do it again — I looked at my bill. Somehow, I had underpaid the bill by a penny. One cent. $00.01

In retribution for my oversight, AT&T is going to sic the collection agency on me. I deserve to pay big for this lapse in fiscal responsibility.Though I actually think it was their error, not mine, but let’s not quibble.

Paying the bill!

Paying the bill!

There are many battles to fight in life. One must pick amongst them lest one be overwhelmed. This giant corporation is going to destroy my credit for want of a penny. This is what happens when computers run the world and no people monitor what they are doing. I’m sure this was all automatically generated. I am equally certain if I’d called them, they would have cancelled the bill. AT&T has pretty good customer service. But that would take even more time and effort. I fondly believe my time, even retired, is worth more than a penny.

So I paid the bill. I wasn’t actually sure my bank would let me pay a one cent bill, but they did.

One cent. Just one cent. Mind boggling.