CHRISTMAS DAY – EVERYONE AT HOME

It was a quiet day. We open presents on Christmas Eve … a tradition started by Owen’s dad and continued. Besides, we’d never make it to Christmas morning. Kaitlin can barely make it through dinner and by 8 pm has reverted to five years old. She wants to get to the main event.

So Christmas day is peace. Lots of napping. Movies, some carols on the radio or CD. Maybe some old TV shows. Too much food and we have a ton left over from last night. No one is going to have to cook for at least a week. Amazingly, we all forgot dessert. We didn’t buy it and make it. So we are heavy on dinner, but there’s no dessert at all. Not a pie, cookie or cake anywhere in the house. How did that happen?

Happy Boxing Day!

24 thoughts on “CHRISTMAS DAY – EVERYONE AT HOME

  1. My family has shrunk over the years, but we enjoy it. It is Swiss tradition to celebrate and open the presents on Christmas Eve. Here’s wishing you and yours all the best season’s greetings.

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    • Ours is pretty small now, too and what is left of it, other than this core at home, is spread out all over the place and we rarely, if ever, see the rest of the family. But that’s the way it is, I guess. Glad enough we have a core family at all.

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  2. Beautiful pictures of family. Now that my boys are older (and we gave them their main present earlier), it wasn’t all about the presents anymore. I worried it would lose some of its excitement, but it was very nice to just relax together and enjoy the fireplace and some special food.

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  3. This is the test and it passes. The keyboard is working again.

    On Thu, Dec 26, 2013 at 12:05 AM, SERENDIPITY wrote:

    > Marilyn Armstrong posted: “It was a quiet day. We open presents on > Christmas Eve … a tradition started by Owen’s dad and continued. Besides, > we’d never make it to Christmas morning. Kaitlin can barely make it through > dinner and by 8 pm has reverted to five years old. She wants to” >

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  4. Awwww, Christmas is so special, and great to celebrate with the family. We all have our own traditions. In Russia, we lay out a table with a white cloth and hay to remind us of the Manger in the Nativity scene.

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  5. Our Santa Claus is named Ded Moroz, or Father Frost. He is attended by Snegurochka, the Snow Maiden, and he brings presents to children to place under the New Year’s tree. He carries a staff, wears valenki and is carried across Russia in a troika.

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  6. Svyatki, the Russian Christmastide, follows the celebration of Christmas and lasts until January 19, the day Epiphany is celebrated here. This two-week period is closely associated with traditions of fortune telling and caroling. If anyone asks to buy me a gift, I usually like being given a Palekh laquered box. They have scenes of Mediavel Russian life on them, like scenes from the Russian Orthodox Church, her saints, churches, monasteries, and convents, and Russian royals, children’s fairy tales, the history of Russia, and nature scenes. I love being given an icon, too! When I was a kid, my mothe would make the best borscht for Christmas. Such a magical time here! The snow, the atmosphere and everything else makes Christmas in Russia so enchanted and splendidly beautiful.

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