INSIDE LOOKING OUT, OUTSIDE LOOKING IN

Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside

light at the end of the hallway

Inside looking towards the light … then outside, looking in at the darkness. Inside and out. In and out. Inside outside.

Heritage Lights 13

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Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Writer, photography, blogger. Previously, technical writer. I am retired and delighted to be so. May I live long and write frequently.

16 thoughts on “INSIDE LOOKING OUT, OUTSIDE LOOKING IN”

  1. Hi. Just came across the etymology of ‘serendipity’ and thought I relate it here, even though I’m pretty sure you know it: “First coined in a letter written by the English novelist Horace Walpole in 1754, the word derives from a Persian fairy tale titled ‘The Three Princes of Serendip’, the protagonists of which were ‘always making discoveries, by accident or sagacity, of things they were not in quest of’. The contemporary novelist John Barth describes it in nautical terms:
    ‘You don’t reach Serendip by plotting a course for it. You have to set out in good faith for elsewhere and lose your bearing serendipitously.'” Have a happy day! (The ‘good faith’ part seems especially profound to me)

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    1. Thank you 🙂 I knew the meaning of the word, but I didn’t know the story. I love this stuff. I used to have some books which gave the background on words, especially Opdyke’s Lexicon. None of them seem to be in print anymore, so I’m delighted with your information. If you don’t mind, I’d like to use it on the “about page” and I’ll link it to your site.

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