THE WALRUS AND THE CARPENTER

 

Embedded-Walrus-carpenter

I have always felt kind of sorry for the oysters. Silly little shellfish, so foolishly trusting.

“The Walrus and the Carpenter” is a narrative poem by Lewis Carroll. It appears in Through the Looking-Glass, (1871). The poem is recited in chapter 4, by Tweedledum and Tweedledee, to Alice.

Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Writer, photography, blogger. Previously, technical writer. I am retired and delighted to be so. May I live long and write frequently.

5 thoughts on “THE WALRUS AND THE CARPENTER”

  1. But they taste so good. Raw on the half-shell, breaded and deep fried, or topped with various herbs, bread crumbs and a butter sauce and baked in their shells to be Oysters Rockefeller.

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  2. I love oysters too – especially the ones in Grand Central’s Oyster Bar. But I remember being so-oooo upset as a child that they could be so easily duped, and the carpenter feigning sorrow behind his handkerchief. What a cad.

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