SINGING IN THE RAIN

My Top 10 “Rain Songs,” by Rich Paschall

Every time I consider a Top 10 list of songs, I think I will never come up with ten.  The fact is, I always pass 10 and must consider which ones to toss.  Remember, this is my top 10.  Some make the list only by virtue of the fact that I heard them thousands of times as I grew up.  They seem to be woven into my life and have been there now for decades.  I have one of recent vintage to toss on the list, I think you will like it.

I did notice there are a lot songs that are well-regarded in this area, but I could not bring myself to add them.  One is the horribly overblown version of November Rain by Guns and Roses.  The over long video with the orchestra and strings is a self-indulgent piece of … (I digress), but it nevertheless makes the top of some lists.  Guitarist Slash said in an interview last year he has no idea what the 1992 video for the song is about.  Yeah, it makes no sense to him either.

Without further a do, or is it ado, or a dew?  Anyway it is not just dew, it is rain and here they are:

10. I Wish it Would Rain, The Temptations
9. Fire and Rain, James Taylor. Taylor has given various explanations of its meaning.
8. Here Comes the Rain Again, Eurythmics
7. Rainy Days and Mondays, The Carpenters Yes, it is pop fluff. I like it anyway.
6. Rainy Night in Georgia, Brook Benton There are a lot of versions, Benton’s is the best.

There are a number of fan videos of Hunter Hayes performing Rainy Season, but nothing official.  Since I have not found a good one, I will give you this audio version from the Encore album.

5.  Rainy Season, Hunter Hayes

Neil Sedaka had a string of hits that go well back into the 1960’s.  His early rock songs made him a star.  In 1974 he composed Laughter in the Rain with lyrics by Phil Cody.  It was a come back for Sedaka and the song made number 1 by February of 1975.  Forty years later, at the age of 76, he gave the following performance.  Yes, I can find earlier versions where his singing is a little better, but I just love it when the old guys can still deliver the goods.

4. Laughter in the Rain, Neil Sedaka

There are a LOT of versions of “Come Rain or Come Shine.”  The Ray Charles version is particularly good, and I highly recommend it.  My addition to the list may surprise you.  Jerry Lewis was not known as a singer and yet, he had a successful album after the breakup of the comedy duo of Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis.  Jerry was eager to prove he had more talent than just as a slapstick comedian.  My mother owned the 45, or was it a 78 rpm, recording and we played it ad nauseam.  The A side was Rock a Bye Your Baby and certainly got a lot of radio and juke box play, but the B side was well-regarded also. There is a You Tube video of Lewis performing the song at one of the 1990s telethons.  I decided to just go with the actual recording he made famous.

3. Come Rain or Come Shine, Jerry Lewis (Jerry Lewis Just Sings)

Whenever I hear this hit song, I think of Paul Newman riding a bicycle in the 1969 movie, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The song was written and produced by the song writing team of Burt Bacharach and Hal David.  It was offered to others, but the B.J. Thomas version is the only one that matters.  It was the first number 1 hit song of the 1970s.  On the version recorded for the film, Thomas was recovering from laryngitis.  It is why that version does not sound the same as the hit record.

2. Rain Drops Keep Falling on my Head, B.J. Thomas

Seriously, what do you think of when you think about rain songs? Purple Rain? Have You Ever Seen Rain? Who’ll Stop the Rain? What one song immediately comes to mind? All fans of movie musicals will think of my number one. Is there any other?

The 1952 film, Singing in the Rain, got its title tune from a 1929 (or earlier) song that appeared in 1929’s The Hollywood Music Box Revue.  It was recorded a number of times before it was recycled to great success as the centerpiece of the classic movie.  Gene Kelly directed and starred in the film, recording one of the most famous dance sequences ever shot.  The remarkable part is that Kelly was ill and running a high fever at the time of the performance.

1. Singing in the Rain, Gene Kelly

Author: Rich Paschall

When the Windows Live Spaces were closed and our sites were sent to Word Press, I thought I might actually write a regular column. A couple years ago I finally decided to try out a weekly entry for a year and published something every Sunday as well as a few other dates. I reached that goal and continued on. I hope you find them interesting. They are my Sunday Night Blog. Thanks to the support of Marilyn Armstrong you may find me from time to time on her blog space, SERENDIPITY. Rich Paschall Education: DePaul University, Northeastern Illinois University Employment: Air freight professional

12 thoughts on “SINGING IN THE RAIN”

  1. I did a whole post called Rainy Days and Mondays. I enjoyed your post. I added Stormy Weather even though rain not in the title. I like Fire and Rain very much. When I hear the word “rain” in Have you heard the rain, Purple Rain and Who”ll stop the rain I think of pain and tears being shed.

    Like

    1. Please.., send rain to Arizona so that we might sing its praises. While Arizona is bad enough it is California where the song is truly and seriously fading out,. I’ve never heard of anyone “Singing in the dust”..?

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I started singing “Laughter in the Rain” when I saw the title of this post, so I’m glad it made the list! GnR was awful in the 90’s… I hate “Patience” as much as I loathe “November Rain.”

    Oran “Juice” Jones had a song in the 80’s simply called “The Rain”, which is one of two pop songs I am aware of that mentions the word “squirrel” in the lyrics…

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Love the list, Rich! I’ve oft mentioned how I sometimes would badly imitate Gene Kelly walking to work in the rain when I lived in Boston. Some folks thought I was practicing a routine for a TV news piece. Others figured I’d had another liquid breakfast.

    Liked by 1 person

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