JUNE IN THE BLACKSTONE VALLEY – MONTHLY PHOTO CHALLENGE

Monthly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons 06

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The rules are simple. Every month, each of us posts pictures of the same area where we live that shows the seasons as they change. It’s June and spring has truly sprung. Everything is blooming.

72-Daisy-Dam-Manchaug-GA-06-15_061

The waterways are full. The wind is gentle and warm. To think, less than two months ago, we were up to our hips in snow and ice.

I went a little farther afield and included a picture of the harbor at Quincy, about 25 miles away. Otherwise, these are all within 3 miles of home. A few of them are Garry’s. Look at the signature for appropriate attribution.

The world turns and each season comes, to be replaced by the next. I got a couple of new lenses, so you’re going to say long shots and macros. Because what’s the point of a new lens if you don’t use it, right?

Fuchsia 4  June 2015

Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Writer, photography, blogger. Previously, technical writer. I am retired and delighted to be so. May I live long and write frequently.

24 thoughts on “JUNE IN THE BLACKSTONE VALLEY – MONTHLY PHOTO CHALLENGE”

  1. Great photos. We are now in the midst of winter while you are showing your summer photos. Strange isn’t it. I am doing this, only every couple of weeks I go to the parks around me just to take new photos to show the change of season.

    Liked by 1 person

        1. It would be possible, but it supports a massive population of snapping turtles, so probably not a good idea. We have areas safe for bathing nearby. Lacking ocean access, we call these areas “beaches.”

          The Blackstone River is more powerful than it appears. Strong undertow.

          That little waterfall can be much larger when there’s more water. We’ve been in drought or water shortage for more than four years. I remember when this was quite a mighty waterfall.

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            1. Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina)
              snapping turtle © Joy Marzolf, Mass Audubon

              Found in all sorts of water bodies, from rivers to lakes to marshes, the snapping turtle can grow up to 19” long. It has three ridges on its carapace, as well as a spiky tail. It eats many different plants and animals, and becomes more vegetarian as it ages. Snapping turtles can be aggressive and deliver a painful bite if threatened, possibly because their small lower shell (plastron) leaves them vulnerable. Give them plenty of space, and be aware that their neck can stretch the length of the shell. Never grab one by the tail—you could seriously injure the turtle.

              They bite. They have long snaky necks and can take quite a piece out of you. They also have a very bad attitude.

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                1. It’s not even safe to dangle your toes in the water. Stupid, nasty creatures. Prolific. Every spring, you can see thousands of baby snappers sunning themselves on the rocks along the river. NOT one of the endangered species.

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