NATURALLY MONOCHROME IN WINTER

Black & White Sunday: NATURAL

When I think of a challenge I intend it to be as broad and as specific as possible. This time the theme is NATURAL – it can be nature in general, human nature or anything in between.

What an interesting challenge from Paula!

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last snow trees vertical winter

I have a variety of pictures, taken during the winter when snow-covered the ground, that are practically speaking, black and white. Naturally monochrome. That is the way the world actually looks in winter.

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It is beautiful, but it should be no surprise that we are all very grateful when the flowers return and there is color in the world again.

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None of these pictures were stripped of color using software. This is the way the world looked at the time. This is winter in New England.



Categories: Black & White, Photography, Seasons, Weather, Winter

Tags: , , , , ,

42 replies

  1. It is NATURAL ! I can feel and touch everything you have shown the snow, snow-covered ground, the freezing temperature, the bare trees sitting here so far from you. Thank you so much for this monochrome tour of New England in winters.

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  2. Your photos were amazing last winter. And perfect for this challenge

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  3. We had a solid four feet of snow on the front lawn from christmas to March, and then, suddenly, it was gone. There have been years when March was the snow month, and April the second snow month, but these past two years have been the equivalent of a sharp short scream: memorable, but not something you’d want to have repeated too often…

    ive lived here in NH all my life, and frankly the novelty of snow isnt. And after all, how many images can you take of drifting and blowig and drooping branches, of snow rising up over the windowsill, of your wood pile shrinking almost faster than the snow is covering it…

    These are, btw, lovely. (I like the one with bits of brown bark or grasses showing, a pleasant almost comforting contrast to the starkness)

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    • The best part of snow, in my opinion, is that it melts and fills the aquifer. Of course, if we got normal spring rains, we wouldn’t need 10 feet of snow. This is the second year in a row we’ve had to have our roof shoveled. It’s worrisome because spring has been so dry here in Massachusetts. How is it up there? We had almost no rain in April and no rain at all in May until the 31st. Since then, lots of clouds, but only two rainy days, today being one of them.

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      • I love the picture of Bonnie Annie Laurie reprising the Lillian Gish role in “Orphans of the Storm”.

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      • This is the first spring I can remember without rain. From the middle of March when the snowmelt started we were braced for the first heavy rain, which in past years has often taken out our very long driveway as well–but there was literally no rain from mid-march to last week, a period of three months. yet it was barely noted on the news, or even by weathermen. We have had one thunderstorm in all that period and a bit of fog. Period. Just this past week did we get a decent rain.
        Last year as well there was a very rapid snowmelt in March but we had rain too to help it along–and where spring is often a reluctant bride around here, for two years running once the snow stops, suddenly its spring, and no backtracking.
        And cold. mein gott it was cold last winter (down to -15) and ive still had low fires running in the stove, with the temps barely above 65 during the day. Global warming? much more of that and we’ll all end up with frostbite…

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        • You’ve had the same weather we’ve had. I asked a friend of ours who IS a weatherman why they don’t talk about the drought. He didn’t have an answer. I think it must be policy at the TV stations to not alarm us or something. I’m sure it’s not his personal decision.

          We have a well. We live on rain. And we are in the Blackstone Valley, so you’d have to be blind and stupid to not notice the river bottom showing and the big ponds drying up. Or the missing swans and geese because there’s nowhere for them to nest. I’m terribly worried, but you and I seem to be a minority.

          When we moved here in 2000, March meant flooding. The Blackstone always went into flood and our long, sloping driveway turned into a river. We had to built drains, a sump with a pump, dig trenches … and we still sometimes flooded.

          The problem is not global warming exactly. It’s global weather changes. Winters definitely ARE colder and snowier, but spring is colder and dry, and summer hasn’t been really hot in several years. We haven’t had normal rainfall in more than five years. That’s a long dry spell.

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          • agreed, but there was a time not so long ago when drought and dry seasons were part of the package when it came to weather. I vividly recall several years ago when we had a dreadful 3 or 4 month drought (even our huge yard maples were looking droopy) and when the rain finally started one idiot newcaster lady said to the weatherman as an intro, “Frank, when are we EVER going to see the SUN?” He did a fine cover for her (and Im sure she was whipped soundly) but I think that must be the prevailing attitude that drought is what they get in CA, not here…
            and for all the cold we’ve had and all the chilly stuff this summer and last, still the song is about Global Warming and its OurFault for breathing, for polluting, for makig those glaciers melt…and people wearing hooded jackets in late June are nodding as if it were true…

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            • I’m sure humans are contributing to changing weather conditions, but I’m also sure weather changes come and go, as do glaciers, cold spells, floods, and droughts. We have misused our water resources and regardless of any other responsibility, we ARE responsible for acting as if polluting the water, draining and poisoning aquifers is no big deal. It IS a big deal. Periods of drought are normal … but the Colorado aquifer was never capable of supporting such a huge human population, or such a wasteful one. And droughts are rare in New England … until recently. Whether or not anyone is going to take notice and stop wasting our water before we have none is an interesting question … and no longer merely an academic one. When you live and die with your well, there’s nothing academic about it.

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  4. I’ve never been sick of snow. It’s sad to see it melting. Winter is too brown and muddy without snow.

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    • Maybe it’s age-related. I know I liked snow when I was a kid. But I think it’s a matter of sheer volume. Snow is one thing. Daily blizzards are another.

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      • I’ve never had a winter as long as you had.

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        • I’ve lived in the northeast almost all of my life, but the last two winters have been the worst I can remember. Last winter was a record breaker. More than 10 feet of snow around here is a LOT of snow. That’s how much snow they get in northern Maine. In the Yukon. It’s overwhelming.

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          • Yeah, that’s a bit much.

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            • Weather patterns are changing. Everyone talks about global warming, but it’s really global disruption. Some places are warmer, but others are colder.

              Liked by 2 people

              • Yes, it’s really interesting and sad to see. Montana had the driest May ever and it looks like June will be the same. I think we should be more prudent with our water usage now, rather than wait as long as California did.

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                • New England has been a state of moderate to severe drought for almost five years. We get enough rain to barely make it, but by the end of June, the dams are shut. Rivers and ponds will be showing bottom.

                  Our well went dry last year as did many others. The aquifer is low and we all have wells around here. No central reservoir. Even the people on “city water” are on the same aquifer, they just get the water from municipal wells. Until about 5 years ago, spring meant flooding. These days, we are lucky if we get rain at all. That’s an enormous change in a very short time … and we are NOT a naturally arid region. It worries me. It ought to worry more people than it does. I don’t know why most people are so unaware of how fragile our fresh water resources are. You obviously are, but so many otherwise smart people seem to think we can’t possibly ever run out of water. We can, though. And we are. Not just out west. Everywhere.

                  Thing is, this area IS the watershed for much of this region, so if we are dry, so is everyone in northern Connecticut and most of Massachusetts.

                  Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful photos even I also prefer the times with flowers all over 😀

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  6. I love winter and winter pictures. I am always excited when summer and fall are over and I am very cheerful when I see the first snowflakes “look honey it’s snowing” and I run around with the dogs. However, after weeks and months of snow it changes to “Frisbee..it’s snowing again, does it ever stop?” 🙂

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    • I love winter. For about a week. After that, I’m ready for something less wet, icy, cold, and white. But it is what it is and though I do not love it, I do appreciate its beauty. I would just like it to be less. Less cold, less snow. Shorter. Alternatively, I guess I’ll take pictures!

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  7. Yes! Brilliant response. Monochrome winter has always fascinated me, and I love these shots. It seems that winter is the most romantic season. Thank you, Marilyn, for this very original entry 🙂

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  1. Black & White Sunday: NATURAL | Lost in Translation
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