LIVING A CALAMITOUS LIFE

Discounting failed marriages and bad investments, both of which count as major disasters, most of life’s problems are little things. Dinners burnt. Stuff you meant to pick up at the grocery, but forgot. Appointments missed. Fender benders, dents, dings, and forgotten oil changes. Tires that got old too fast. Appliances that stop working before you finish paying for them. Computer viruses and bad software.

problem solving dogs

Little things can accumulate into bigger things. If you forget enough appointments with your dentist, you lose the tooth. When you burn the holiday dinner, those accusing eyes at the dinner table can make you feel like the turkey at the feast. The Titanic was not sunk by a big hole in the hull. It was thousands of popped rivets that turned her into a sieve. And down went the big ship to the briny deep.

Speaking of the small stuff and a life of perpetual crisis, I have an acquaintance — an almost friend — for whom everything is the end of the world. Life is one huge calamity. She’s a Facebook kind of gal, so no matter what happens, she’s telling the world the sky is falling. On her. It’s personal. If it’s snowing, it’s to punish her. Ditto if it’s raining. (She’s the person who complains it’s raining in the middle of a drought.)

I thought about it one day after reading one of her posts. Her usual collection of followers were commenting on how she is the unluckiest woman on earth.

Is she? A few minutes of pondering made me realize I have as many bumps in my road of life as she does. On a bad year, probably more. Mostly, unless it’s serious enough to sink the ship of state, I fix the problem as best I can and move on.

panic button

So much of “disaster” is perspective, response, and perception. We choose how to deal with the stuff we encounter. I expect the airline to lose our luggage (or some piece of it), but I also count on them to find it again. It’s an inconvenience, not the end of the world. I try not to let it define our travels.

If every problem is a cataclysm, we are the boy who cried wolf. Our friends and family stop listening so when a really bad thing happens … no one is there.

Disaster – The Daily Post

THE BELL TOLLS – IT’S DINNERTIME!

If there’s one universal truth about life on earth, it’s that all that lives — plant or animal — eats. From the birds in the sky and the Christmas cacti in the dining room, to the ants who annually invade my kitchen — it’s dinnertime.

Biscuit time - All dogs

Ask the dogs. Gibbs has been with us just a month, but before he had been here two days, he knew the sound of the biscuit box being opened. It would bring him hot-footing it from the farthest edge of the yard to the kitchen, dancing with glee at the chance to get a piece of dry, hard, tasteless dog biscuit.

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Of all the dining venues the U.S. has to offer, nothing is as uniquely American as the diner. George’s Coney Island in Worcester, Massachusetts is old. Serving hot dogs and other quick foods since 1918, its retro look is not feigned.

It’s still pretty much in its original form, from the dark wood booths to the huge, mustard dripping hot dog neon sign.

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What’s your preference? If you are peckish, really hungry or just looking for a toothsome nibble, what do you crave?

If you’re not sure, try the diner. They’ve got everything!

I participate in WordPress' Weekly Photo Challenge 2016

I participate in WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge 2016

DINNERTIME – The Daily Post WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge

FENCES AND GATES: CEE’S BLACK AND WHITE CHALLENGE

I’ve always loved taking pictures of gates and fences. There are so many different shapes and materials. Some are merely decorative while other are formidable, intended to keep the world away.

This week, Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge (CB&W) topic is all about Fences and Gates, as simple as a barbed wire fence to a fence that forms a fortress.

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fence for cows in a the field

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Fenceline

Most of our local fences are simple. Wood and wire or just wood. To keep the cows in the pasture, keep the horses in the corral.

Thanks Cee for another excellent challenge!

Cee's Black & White Photo Challenge Badge