LIVING A CALAMITOUS LIFE

Discounting failed marriages and bad investments, both of which count as major disasters, most of life’s problems are little things. Dinners burnt. Stuff you meant to pick up at the grocery, but forgot. Appointments missed. Fender benders, dents, dings, and forgotten oil changes. Tires that got old too fast. Appliances that stop working before you finish paying for them. Computer viruses and bad software.

problem solving dogs

Little things can accumulate into bigger things. If you forget enough appointments with your dentist, you lose the tooth. When you burn the holiday dinner, those accusing eyes at the dinner table can make you feel like the turkey at the feast. The Titanic was not sunk by a big hole in the hull. It was thousands of popped rivets that turned her into a sieve. And down went the big ship to the briny deep.

Speaking of the small stuff and a life of perpetual crisis, I have an acquaintance — an almost friend — for whom everything is the end of the world. Life is one huge calamity. She’s a Facebook kind of gal, so no matter what happens, she’s telling the world the sky is falling. On her. It’s personal. If it’s snowing, it’s to punish her. Ditto if it’s raining. (She’s the person who complains it’s raining in the middle of a drought.)

I thought about it one day after reading one of her posts. Her usual collection of followers were commenting on how she is the unluckiest woman on earth.

Is she? A few minutes of pondering made me realize I have as many bumps in my road of life as she does. On a bad year, probably more. Mostly, unless it’s serious enough to sink the ship of state, I fix the problem as best I can and move on.

panic button

So much of “disaster” is perspective, response, and perception. We choose how to deal with the stuff we encounter. I expect the airline to lose our luggage (or some piece of it), but I also count on them to find it again. It’s an inconvenience, not the end of the world. I try not to let it define our travels.

If every problem is a cataclysm, we are the boy who cried wolf. Our friends and family stop listening so when a really bad thing happens … no one is there.

Disaster – The Daily Post

36 thoughts on “LIVING A CALAMITOUS LIFE

  1. Pingback: NaPoWriMo – Day 16 – “My Kingdom For An Honest Newspaper Headline” by David Ellis | toofulltowrite (I've started so I'll finish)

    • What makes me crazy is that most of them make their OWN problems. If they stopped complaining, they might notice life is not all bad. If it weren’t for Farm Town, I’d probably give up FB too … but addicted is addicted.

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  2. Perhaps social media’s become the new opium of the masses? I like my social media just as much as anybody, but I have to consciously step back at times to avoid becoming over-addicted to it and how it lifts/sinks my mood.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I was following a blogger who thrived on – relished – her pain, misfortune and general victimhood. You could almost see the the wrist to the brow. It was sort of compulsive reading for a while, in a train-wreck kind of way, but after a while I wanted to smack her and tell her to grow up and get over herself. You can only sympathise for just so long with people who choose not to help themselves.

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  4. I have a niece like that. Everything is a tragedy. Everything. The whole world is against her and she can do no wrong. She’s also a Facebook drama queen, and while I still have her as a Facebook friend, her stuff no longer gets posted to my newsfeed. It’s just too much.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. FB is one big epic disaster site most times. I know the types that blame it all on the others and the friends all group around and say how unfair life is to you, we unerstand you and you are right etc. etc. instead of saying what a load of old rubbish and it’s nobody’s business but your own. One thing I have learnt, one step at a time. Rushing into anything will not solve the problem.

    Liked by 1 person

    • And having 20 people cheering on your bad decisions isn’t healthy, either. Bloggers do this too. I think there are people who thrive on other people’s misery and encourage it. One of the things that I have learned is that unless you have heard more than one side of the story, you don’t really know anything.

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