BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY – TOWERING

From PaulaBlack & White Sunday Challenge this week has towering as a theme. Towering can be a building, a person, a mountain, or a tree. Or …

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“Towering” is relative. In our small town, a church spire is towering. On Boston’s Beacon Hill, six stories is a tower. In downtown Boston, the sky is the limit … and maybe, not even the sky.

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I de-saturated these two photographs of the Prudential Tower in Boston, but left a hint of color. The Prudential Tower changes colors depending on events and weather. Each night of December 2015, the tower was a different color. This specific night was December 13th, lit in support of the Rett Syndrome Association of Massachusetts. The color was purple.

If you’d like to see all the colors of the month, you can follow this LINK.

11 thoughts on “BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY – TOWERING

  1. Pingback: Black & White Sunday: Towering | Lost in Translation

  2. Yes, it all depends on the perspective. Wonderful details and composition of the Beacon Hill tower! I like the reflections too. Thank you for your great response, Marilyn!

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    • Thanks Paula! A while ago, I started shooting almost straight up at walls of tall buildings. It always makes an interesting, if distorted, picture. Also … a lot of New England is very “close.” Even in the country, towns are snug, much like Old England. There aren’t a lot of place to step back for perspective, so shooting tight may be the only way to shoot. This is especially true in big, older cities like New York and Boston. And anyway, it’s fun 🙂

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    • Thanks!! That is a nifty building. I think it dates to the early 1800s and was an early Beacon Hill big apartment house. Probably “affordable housing” in its day.

      Obviously, now that this is the omigod high rent district, they’ve renovated, added elevators and all the other amenities rich people expect. I love the wrought iron work. You don’t see that anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

    • You are right on, though you could argue that Beacon Hill, like your French quarters, is almost a city within a city. You can see some very fancy wrought iron work all over the hill. I think the architecture is very similar and the same period as you find in Montreal and Quebec … and New Orleans. New York has mostly knocked those old buildings down, but that’s the NY way.

      Liked by 1 person

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