HOW TABLETS DIDN’T REPLACE LAPTOPS. AND WON’T.

Last year, I wrote an update to my original commentary (from November 2012 – WHY TABLETS CAN’T REPLACE COMPUTERS AND WHY THEY SHOULDN’T) about how tablets were NOT going to replace laptops which absolutely everyone agreed was inevitable and I thought was utter rubbish. Today, in TechRadar, one of the original places that predicted the demise of laptops, the very same experts who predicted the demise of laptops and desktops completely reversed their position. Minus the fanfare with which the predicted the demise of computers, I might add.


15 best laptops you can buy in 2016

By Kevin Lee

The best laptops for your every need (NOTE: Not MY every need!)

“With the advent of the iPad just over six years ago, analysts were expecting laptops to be ousted by tablets at this point. Fortunately, for PC makers, that never happened. In fact, with the recent début of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update alongside new AMD and Nvidia graphics cards and Intel’s new Kaby Lake processors, the best laptops on the market continue to thrive.

Between thin, light and stylish budget notebooks like the HP Chromebook 13 and thick, robust powerhouse computers like the MSI GT62VR Dominator Pro, laptops are on their way up rather than out. Even Apple’s MacBook sees persistent success year after year despite all the changes MacOS has undergone since 1984.”

Isn’t that what I said?  See my post: “WHY TABLETS DIDN’T REPLACE COMPUTERS.” November 20, 2015


It continues to list each computer in their “top 15 pick.” As it happens, in the course of searching for the computer that would best suite me, I looked at every one of these and dismissed them all.

“BEST” IS A RELATIVE TERM

Best is relative and subjective. “Best”for whom and under what circumstances? Not best for me. None of these machines contain enough graphics support or RAM to run Photoshop. So maybe these are the “best” for the magazine’s editors? Or for “the average computer user” who is …? Are you an average user? If so, what does that mean? What do “average” users use?

Articles like this and previous articles on the anticipated disappearance of computers mislead people. If you accept this stuff as “expert opinion” and don’t do your own research, you will end up with the wrong machine. Quite possibly a very expensive, yet terribly wrong machine.

alienware side view computer

Here’s my rewritten article from last year. I was right. Not because I’m a genius, but because I don’t accept opinion as truth.  “Experts” don’t know a lot more than you do, but they are paid to make you think they have some kind of pipeline to ultimate truth. Their opinions are nothing more than personal opinion heavily influenced by big computer company sponsors. Sales pitches disguised as expert advice. Be very wary of taking this kind of thing at face value.

Know what you need. What you do. And what you require to make it work for you.


WHY TABLETS CAN’T REPLACE COMPUTERS. WHY THEY SHOULDN’T. (December 2014)

I originally wrote a longer version of this in November 2012 and the link for it as been included. At that time, agreement among “experts” was nearly universal. Tablets would replace desktop and laptop computers. Within a couple of years — in other words, by now — everyone would be using a tablet for everything. I disagreed then. I was right. (Don’t you love when that happens?)

Tablet sales have slowed, not because tablets aren’t fun or don’t have a place in our lives, but because everyone has one, or two, or three of them. And because, as it turns out, tablets do what they do, which isn’t everything.

I remember reading all those articles announcing how tablets will replace laptops and desktops. This, based on the surge in tablet sales and the slowing of computer sales. Every time I read one of those articles, I wanted to reach through my monitor, grab the author by the throat and shake him or her.

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I don’t have anything against portable devices. I have quite a few of them, but there are a couple of differences between me and those authors:

1) The reviewers apparently don’t do any work. Not only do they not do any work, they don’t even have hobbies.

2) They think their favorite device is perfect and can do everything.

Have any of the people extolling mini devices as the total computer solution designed a book? Made a movie? Used Photoshop? Converted a document to PDF? Tried playing games on a tablet? It’s nearly impossible. All other issues aside, the screens are too small.

Virtual keyboards are good for virtual fingers …

I just read an article explaining how you can type perfectly fine on the iPad’s virtual keypad. Having tried typing on a variety of tablets, that’s an outright lie. Not true. You can’t type on a virtual keyboard because (trumpets) there are no keys.

You need memory and a hard drive to run applications.

You can’t run photo or video editing software on a tablet. Or a Chromebook. Or a Smartphone. It’s not that it won’t run well. It won’t run at all. It has to be installed. It uses a lot of memory. Without a hard drive, you can’t install it. Even online versions of these applications won’t run on small devices. If you use a real camera — anything more than a basic point and shoot, or a telephone — you can’t even download your photos, much less edit them. If you shoot RAW, you might not be able to load a single photograph on your device.

 

You can’t edit a 16 X 20 photograph on a 10 inch tablet. Much less a cell phone.

This is not a matter of opinion. It’s a fact. Can’t do it. Can’t see enough of the pictures to know what you are doing. It does not matter whether we are talking about a Kindle, an android tablet, or an iPad. Operating system is irrelevant. The device is physically too small to do the job. Even if it had a hard drive and enough memory (none of them do), you still couldn’t do it.

Who needs footnotes? Engineering drawings? Spreadsheets? I do, that’s who.

And good luck editing video on a tablet. Let me know how that works for you.

About that thesis: footnotes and bibliographies, and cross references? Explain to your adviser how you can’t include references and attributions because your tablet can’t do it. Surely they will understand. After all, computers are obsolete. And who needs attribution anyhow?

If you’re an architect or engineer? Return to your drawing table and start doing them by hand. I hope you still have those old-fashioned tools and remember how to use them, because you won’t be doing them on your tablet.

Need a spreadsheet? Not going to happen. Even if all you are trying to do is track your own household budget, you can’t do it on your tablet or telephone.

alienware computer front full

It’s a big world with room for many operating systems and devices … you don’t need to dump one to have the other.

There’s room in our lives for many different devices. And operating systems.

I prefer stuff that’s dedicated to specific tasks or sets of tasks. I love reading books on my Kindle. I edit on my desktop with the big HD monitor. I use my laptop when I don’t what to be stuck in my office, which these days seem to all the time.

You love your iPad? Enjoy it, but respect its limits — because they’re also its advantages. If you make it big and powerful enough to handle the tasks it currently can’t manage — larger screen, real hard drive, RAM, keyboard — it’s not a fun, portable device any more. If you need that much functionality, you need a laptop or desktop.

You can’t replace everything with one thing. There’s no reason you should.

One size does not fit all.

It’s okay to be different. Whether it’s your religion or political opinion — or which computer system you prefer, diversity and differences make the world interesting. Live your life as you prefer. Let others do the same.

ALONG THE BLACKSTONE – CEE’S BLACK & WHITE CHALLENGE

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Liquid


Manchaug

Manchaug

Water is everywhere in the valley. The Blackstone and Mumford Rivers, Whitins Pond and all the canals and tributaries. So many ponds, streams, creeks, and wetlands.

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The Blackstone Canal – November

When snow is on the ground — or melting — the world is essentially black and white with barely a hint of brown in the bark of the trees or a touch of blue in the sky.

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The Blackstone River – Late March

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The Blackstone River – Vernal Equinox

The Blackstone in August

The Blackstone in August

Riverbend along the Blackstone

Riverbend along the Blackstone

Cee's Black & White Photo Challenge Badge