THE TEXTURE OF WOOD: THURSDAYS TAKE ON TUESDAYS TEXTURES

Tuesdays of Texture – Week 45 of 2016


72-tall-old-tree-cemetary-ma-10072016_133
Probably the oldest tree in our town. In the oldest cemetery in town. It’s tall and the bark is full of stories.

This post is about the textures of wood. Bark while it’s growing. It’s rings and history after being cut down. And eventually, it’s smooth beauty after it has become something else with only a vague memory of once upon a time having been a tree.

dulcimer 4
The dulcimer began life as trees. Several different trees. Rosewood, spruce, and maple. Does the dulcimer remember the trees from which it was created?

23 thoughts on “THE TEXTURE OF WOOD: THURSDAYS TAKE ON TUESDAYS TEXTURES

    • Marilyn Armstrong November 3, 2016 / 11:59 am

      In this case, possibly the graveyard 🙂 Probably being IN a graveyard is what kept it alive and not cut down for a ship’s mast!

      Liked by 2 people

  1. Judy @ NewEnglandGardenAndThread November 3, 2016 / 4:45 pm

    Years ago, my father-in-law made several dulcimers for family members. He enjoyed playing one at family gatherings, and it was always a fun time for all. 🙂

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    • Marilyn Armstrong November 3, 2016 / 5:45 pm

      I think the dulcimer family is the only truly all-American musical instruments. They are so simple, but so haunting.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. swo8 November 3, 2016 / 5:02 pm

    I love that Dulcimer. It is gorgeous!
    Leslie

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      • swo8 November 3, 2016 / 6:29 pm

        Marilyn, I think I can hear it from here. There are four strings (I think) are they the same as the violin? (GDAE)
        Leslie

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        • Marilyn Armstrong November 3, 2016 / 6:42 pm

          I don’t know how a violin is tuned, but it turns out, there are many different ways to tune a dulcimer. Typically two strings are the same and the others depend on what you are doing with vocals. It’s a folk instrument, so you can look it up. Basically, you can tune it any way the strings will tolerate and work for you.

          Liked by 1 person

          • swo8 November 3, 2016 / 6:44 pm

            The violin goes up in 5ths.
            Leslie

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            • Marilyn Armstrong November 3, 2016 / 10:47 pm

              I don’t know if the dulcimer would let you pull the strings that tight. I think it would depend on the individual instrument, but also the strings and the machines. It uses banjo strings, by the way.

              Liked by 1 person

              • swo8 November 4, 2016 / 11:18 am

                I just did a quick Google on the strings of a dulcimer. I have heard one played and it was lovely.
                Leslie

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                • Marilyn Armstrong November 4, 2016 / 11:30 am

                  The nice thing for anyone who just loves instruments is that you can play it badly, but still enjoy playing. You can play brilliantly, too and invent new ways to play … but it’s an instrument for everyone. As long as your music is modal.

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • swo8 November 4, 2016 / 12:38 pm

                    It is a beautiful instrument, Marilyn. I must be repeating myself.
                    Leslie

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  3. DailyMusings November 3, 2016 / 9:01 pm

    What a wonderful tree and an amazing shot and perspective. I LOVE that Dulcimer-it is just beautiful

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    • Marilyn Armstrong November 3, 2016 / 10:46 pm

      Thank you 🙂 It is a beautiful tree and an exquisite dulcimer. I’m glad was able to show both of them, the tree and wood as it is transformed into other things that have their own magic.

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  4. narami November 7, 2016 / 10:43 am

    Hello Marilyn! Sorry for the delay – I did everything off my mobile the last couple of days because I was on full mommy duties and had troubles trying to comment and forwarding this to twitter – I love this post!

    That dulcimer does remind me of the trees it came from, it is a beautiful piece. Thank you so much for sharing it with me and my readers. I love that this will be another wood post featured tomorrow 🙂

    Like

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