SOMEDAY, MY …. WILL COME

SOMEDAY | THE DAILY POST


You know the Disney song, right?

“Someday my prince will come” — Snow White sings it to the seven dwarfs in the Disney animated classic from 1937. It was the beginning of serious animation. Who could forget?

When I was learning photography, back in the early 1970s from a friend with a good education in photography and an odd sense of humor, I learned a different set of lyrics. But first … the back story.

For black and white film (it was all film at that point … digital photography was decades in the future) … we did our own developing and printing. The university I had attended — and for that matter, that my friend had also attended — had a dark room which he ran. Whatever photographic work the school needed, he did it. But it left a lot of time for personal projects and having a spacious, well-equipped dark room and laboratory was a dream come true. All I had to supply was paper and chemicals. I learned a huge amount in those few years during which I had access to the facilities.

Color was different. For color work, we were dependent on a (very) few custom photography labs. You could cheap out and drop your film off at the drug store — if you didn’t mind negatives covered with scratches and bad prints on the cheapest paper. If, however you wanted some quality proofs and prints made by hand from negatives properly developed, you needed a trustworthy (expensive) lab. The equipment to develop and print color was too big and too costly for an individual. Oh how times have changed!

Custom labs took a long time. They called themselves “custom” and they really were. They hand developed the negatives and prints, though proofs were generally done by machine unless you specified otherwise. Usually, we order proof sheets and from these, selected the frames we thought were worth blowing up.

Today, you can get amazing, high quality work from laboratories that will take your files over the Internet and mail you prints on paper, wood, canvas, aluminum, or whatever. They will do it quickly and usually at competitive prices. In the old days, custom work was the province of professional photographers. This meant weddings, babies, other events big and small. Also, material for magazines and advertising agencies. Most of the pros used large format cameras which were (still are) so expensive they may cause fainting on the spot.  Like, for example, a Hasselblad, the preferred camera of NASA where the camera body alone costs more than my house …  and don’t even ask about lenses.

Being an amateur, my print orders were never at the head of the queue. So, I’d wait. Sometimes weeks just to get proofs … which would be the first time I even knew if the pictures were good. It was a time of great anxiety.

While we waited, we sang:

“SOMEDAY MY PRINTS WILL COME … Some DAY, my PRINTS will come …”

Eventually, they did.


I love digital cameras.

SNOW COVERS THE WAY – CEE’S WHICH WAY CHALLENGE – GARRY ARMSTRONG (MOSTLY)

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge – January 11, 2017


It’s winter again. Trails in snow … and trails covered by snow. We’ve had some snow and we’ve had some record-breaking warm weather between snows that makes all that white stuff go away.

These pictures by Garry were taken the morning after the storm. They are my favorites.

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If snow weren’t so pretty, I don’t think I’d make it through the season!

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Cee which way photo challenge

 

 

UNFOCUSED, SOFT FOCUS, ABSTRACT – THURSDAY’S SPECIAL

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THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: UNFOCUSED


FROM PAULA: If you are anything like me three years ago, you are going to curse today’s theme. Since then, however, I developed a liking for unfocused in photography. I became aware of how nice it is to have your main subject isolated by shallow depth of field, how to accentuate parts of images by selective focusing, how to make model-like scenes imitating tilt and shift effect. My liking of the unfocused went a step farther. I decided to make the whole image unfocused and liked the dreamy feel of it in the image that showcases a well-known symbol of my town.

You may take different approaches to this subject. You can take a photo where part of the image is unfocused or like me you can make it unfocused all the way. No matter how you obtained it, whether on purpose or by a happy accident, show me the lack of focus or should I say – the presence of unfocused – in your images.

In order to obtain unfocused you may choose to focus in front or beyond your main subject and make sure to choose wide aperture. Also, try to use manual focusing mode to avoid camera’s attempt to find something to focus on.


And now, two watercolors on a post-snowstorm morning.

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