MUSICALLY SPEAKING – THE BLACK & WHITE PHOTO CHALLENGE

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Music


Even if I don’t play them, I love musical instruments. I recently sold my piano, but I still have the organ. It no longer works, but at least I can now fit it in the room without blocking access to the dining table. That’s an improvement, believe me. I rehomed my baritone uke in favor of a concert uke. I had drums, flutes, and I still have a pair of Australian Aboriginal music sticks.

In living black and white, this is music (everybody, please sing along)!

Sui dynastic veru p;d porcelain musicians from China. One of my price possession!

Sui dynasty (very old) porcelain musicians from China. A prize possession!

Bass fiddles at the Boston Pops

Bass fiddle at the Boston Pops

My mountain dulcimer - hand made of rosewood and balsam. I think there's a bit of oak in the mix, too

My mountain dulcimer – hand made of rosewood and balsam. I think there’s a bit of oak in the mix, too

The Berkshire Chorus (at the Pops)

The Berkshire Chorus (at the Pops)

Nothing more black & white than a keyboard ...

Nothing more black & white than a keyboard …

classical-tongue-twister

Cee's Black & White Photo Challenge Badge

30 thoughts on “MUSICALLY SPEAKING – THE BLACK & WHITE PHOTO CHALLENGE

    • Thank you, Cee. My right hand and shoulder are telling me to take it easy on the keyboard today, so it was a great choice to use pictures I already had available. I think I need to take a physical break from the computer. My arm is really hurting today. Too much keyboard πŸ™‚

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  1. Love the photos, especially the Chinese group.I could not imagine a home without music instruments. Mr. Swiss with his drums (one set at home, one set in his rehearsal room), my youngest son with his guitar, although he is no longer here, and my oldest with his electric piano. I also have my large Yamaha piano at home and we even had an old piano in London. We did not have very much money, but we had a piano, it seemed that everone had a piano at that time. Isn’t it wonderful to be surrounded by music?

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    • When we were kids, EVERYBODY had a piano. Often, it was an old clunker and always out of tune. My mother had one growing up on Manhattan’s lower east side (very like your East End). It was where the poorest immigrants lived. Cold water flats in rickety old buildings, but people had pianos. I think one of the first things my mother bought when she had her own house was a piano and then, when i was more serious about music, a bigger, better piano for me. Now, I have fewer instrument. My hands are too arthritic to do much , but I can strum a little on the ukulele. I still recognize every piece of music I ever learned while studying. Garry’s brother Anton is a conductor and professor of music at St. Olaf College. He tours Europe with his choir … he may show up in a city near near you one of these years.

      When music is important to you, it’s just part of your life.

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  2. We also had a piano. My mom, who grew up in Memphis used to play, both classical and a kind of “rag style” and so we listened to those tunes many times over.., and then my dad built a HiFi, the first in our neighborhood. My life was changed forever.

    Great photos Marilyn, especially 2 & 3.

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      • I won music competitions in school, both singing and ability to play instruments, but my mother wouldn’t allow me to join the school band. I got THE top mark and was so proud of that. My kids have musical talent as well but my constant wish is they’ll do something with it.

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        • Music runs in families. My mother was musical. Untrained, but she had a nice voice and had taught herself to play the piano. She was thrilled that I had some talent, sad that my brother was tone deaf. Garry’s mom had a great voice, though because deafness (not tone deafness, actual inability to hear) ran in the family;, the only one spared was Garry’s brother, who is a conductor and professor of music. It’s too bad your mother didn’t encourage you, but nice that your kids are musical. My son, sadly, is tone deaf, like my brother. Also inherited.

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  3. Yes, as everyone has said, fantastic photos. Those Chinese figurines truly are a treasure. How very beautiful. And the dulcimer. It seems such an astonishing magical thing for anyone to own. And you have it!

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        • I’m a little surprised by me because I had had that made for myself, but it turned out the arthritis in my hands made it impossible to play it. Bad angle. So my best friend has a friend who is poor, but has always played, but no longer had an instrument, so I volunteered mine. I’m a little surprised at me. That was a pretty expensive instrument and I loved it. But it seemed better to give it a good home that just sell it to someone I didn’t know. I’m a bit protective of musical instruments. They are like puppies. They need understanding homes.

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