DRIP. DRIP. DRIP.

Everything is on the table now, from resignation of the president on down. Discoveries that contact with the Russians took place far earlier than previously suspected throws a whole new layer of potential guilt on the administration.

Drip. Drip. Drip.

Flynn wants immunity. If he gets it, he’ll sing like a bird. He might sing like a bird anyway. There is a credible rumor that himself has opened the resignation option. Apparently should Flynn give it up, the president’s future is not bright. But he will want immunity too. Lots of immunity hanging on the wires.

So many people, including Kushner, seem to have been involved with Sergey Kislyak. This is all about how many of SCROTUS’ cronies were “chatting” with Kislyak. When. What were they saying. In case you aren’t clear who’s who in this mess, Sergey Kislyak is likely Russia’s biggest spymaster. Not a nice guy.

trump_nixon-800x430

This is about how much the Russians knew. How they knew it. And how much involvement did the Republican party have in the Russians knowing it. Was there collusion on the part of the president and his cohorts? Did it start as early as March 2016?

So it is Nixon-like. He didn’t have to spy on the Democratic party, but he did it anyway. As to SCROTUS, my guess is whatever he got from his Russian connections, he could have gotten the same results without Russian involvement. Just a guess.

Nixon was elected by a wave of Americans who didn’t like the negative talk about Vietnam. He got in kind of like SCROTUS. With a plurality in Congress and all that. But there was this thing hanging over him. The burglaries at Watergate and his collusion in its cover-up. Nixon wasn’t half as bad as SCROTUS, but it was bad enough. These days, he looks pretty good. That IS ironic.


Sessions was responding to a Washington Post report, published Wednesday night, in which Department of Justice officials confirmed that he had twice met the Russian Ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, during the campaign. Sessions also appears to have misled the Senate about his contacts. At a January 10th confirmation hearing before the Judiciary Committee, Senator Al Franken, the Minnesota Democrat, asked Sessions what he would do, as Attorney General, “if there is any evidence that anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign communicated with the Russian government in the course of this campaign.” Sessions, under oath, replied, “I’m not aware of any of those activities.” He added, “I have been called a surrogate at a time or two in that campaign, and I did not have communications with the Russians.”

The New Yorker, By , March 2, 2017


That was the beginning.  One month later, so much is going on, it’s hard to keep track. This is very Richard Nixon. Faster, but the same pattern. This is how it went. Drip. Drip. Drip.

One down, one to go. Two down, another on the way. Three down, four down. Five down. Drip. Drip. Drip.

And finally, the president went down. His Vice-President had already gone down, replaced by a perfectly pleasant fellow who never really got much of an opportunity to do anything. Ultimately, the pall of Nixon lay over Washington like a layer of oil on a roadway. Traffic that hit the oily patch went spinning wildly off the road.

Drip. Drip. Drip.

We were watching NBC News and they were saying if the GOP does not deal with “the Russian issue,” it will take down this presidency. No one will get the opportunity to do anything — which would be fine with me. So, if you aren’t old enough to remember, this is how it went.


Nixon hated the press, but at least he didn’t go out of his way to make all of them hate him at the same time.

The taking down of Richard Nixon became a daily event. I bought myself a tiny radio which I listened to whenever I could. I came back from work and planted myself in front of the television. The story kept going. Drip. Drip. Drip.

Sergey Kislyak and Jeff Sessions - Photo: CNN

Sergey Kislyak and Jeff Sessions – Photo: CNN

Then, there was nowhere left for Nixon to turn. He resigned. He wasn’t half as bad as this guy. He just taunted the press with “you can’t get me.” They got him.

At this point, the entire press corps is on SCROTUS’ tail. Like hounds with a strong smell of game in their nostrils, they will track him wherever he goes. He literally asked for it. What an incredibly stupid thing to say to the press. They may not be as “up to strength” as they were in the 1970s, but being press is what they do. What they are. Reporters live for exactly this kind of thing. With all the awfulness of what’s happening, this is the blood of life to the press.

Drip. Drip. Drip.

45 thoughts on “DRIP. DRIP. DRIP.

  1. But then we end up with Pence. We are stuck with one version of this mess or another for the next 3 yrs and 9 months.
    No good answers here. The country is in a really bad spot right now. I’ve begun to think of this as the modern “dark ages.”

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Thank you, Marilyn. Great piece. I remember it well. Have also been in the memory mode, connecting on Views from the Edge the dots of memories from the ’70s with what’s happening today in the USA.

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    • I rewrote this to catch up on what has happened in a month. I may do it again next month. Because that drip, drip, drip is going to save us in the end. Like the slow dripping that turns a little creek into a big river. Drip, drip, drip.

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      • Am a little confused (a regular state of mine these days) as to where that came from? I don’t recall making any suggestion of revolution or war (which i detest as man’s ultimate act of stupidity). I do recall commenting that we should all take a greater interest in and become more aware of politics that so many of your and my countrymen have grown seemingly more apathetic and denigrating of, leading to a world wide rise in nationalism and populist wannabe dictators in patriots clothing riding on the waves of popular discontent. I also have commented (more on my blog than here perhaps) that we all actually have a lot more in common than is highlighted in modern media or seems to be held in the mind of the general world population, and that we should all focus on that commonality as a single species sharing this planet rather than as we do on our differences; our Beliefs (including atheism), our countries, our sexualities and our skin colours, not to mention our brand of political allegiances.

        The only revolution i would encourage is one of individual growth in understanding that leads to a co-operative, rather than competitive society, with greater equality between individuals than exists at present.

        I will admit to not liking the results either your system of government or mine has so far produced regarding equality and the sharing of wealth and concede that i tend to see and comment on the faults more than the successes which you seem to be able to see much more clearly than i can. Hope that clarifies and aids our understandings here a little?

        love.

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  3. Strangely ambivalent about this: i am both horrified that this is happening, (and that it even needs to) and relieved that it’s happening at all.
    I don’t see Pence as the problem child that the Donald is, his temperament is very different. He may not be good, but he’s not insane.
    And he would be appointing a VP, so there is hope there.

    Onnnn the other hand…he could go down with the Donald, too. That’s when the chain of command starts getting a bit iffy.

    I did notice that my husband is no longer watching too much news. It’s kinda sad when your hero turns out to be made of chocolate pudding and hot sauce.

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    • Hot sauce? Where’s the hot sauce? Oh, you mean Twitter?

      If pudding had just not invited the entire universe to drop by and check out how sleazoid he is, if he had tried even briefly to “act like a president,” he might have ridden this out. Worse for us, but he really baited his own trap and sat in the middle like a worm on fishing line. Also … he really IS stupid.

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  4. This is a great summation. Thanks. My wife is from Venezuela and she keeps pointing out how Trump is following the same pattern that she saw there. Promise the poor and middle-class everything, but no need to deliver. Convince people that the media are liars not to be trusted (Fake News) then shut down channels as needed. Block outside media (CNN en español is no longer available in Venezuela as it might shine some light on the situation).Hopefully it will not come to that but …..

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    • I think he has passed the point where he has any power to do that. Maybe in the beginning, we were scared, but at this point, most people are less scared and more shocked, horrified, hysterical (as in laughing too hard) at the Keystone Kops supposedly running the government. They INVITED this into their world. If prez had simply shut up … but he didn’t. And we are a big country. Unlike Venezuela, we have a pretty good tripartate system that — apparently — works. I hoped, but until I began to see it work, I didn’t know. It could have easily gone have another way … and I am SO grateful it didn’t.

      Liked by 2 people

    • I cannot think everything at once. You shouldn’t either. We didn’t make this mess and it will take some time to squirm out of it. It’s very hard to know what’s going to happen. It’s bad enough “knowing,” and much worse wondering. So I’m working with what I know and dealing with that … and watching movies and reading books in between. You can’t DO THIS ALL THE TIME. It will make you jibber.

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        • I think the they have ALREADY self-destructed. The Republicans have everyone in office. From president to representative, they won. And they can’t pass a law. They can’t agree on ANYTHING. At all. I think that’s great, but I also thing we, that other side, better get OUR shit together and soon.

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  5. We need to be careful what we wish for — at least Pence is more sane, but his views are not much better than 45’s. And he was part of the campaign, too — was he also involved? The drip, drip, drip continues, and will distract for a while!

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    • I think Pence may actually be worse. But this isn’t going to be a quick fix, not matter what we do. All we can do is chip away, one piece at a time. And make sure that in the next election (2018) and the bigger one in 2020, we do NOT let this happen again.

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    • Got it, though I think a somewhat abridged version. I subscribe the the Boston Globe which is the favorite child of the New York Times (they now own it), so at least I get those parts in their entirety and for no special reason, I get the NY Post for free and we get The New Yorker. Otherwise, Garry buys newspapers. No matter what he gets online, nothing makes him feel the way a real newspaper does. And humorously, suddenly, again … the paper is huge and thick again. Newspapers are back!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Not so much abridged as introductory — more to come in the next few days/weeks. I’m pleased to see the Times taking on Trump in this way — and, as you are, pleased to see newspapers coming back (though the Times is still pretty sad.

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        • It’s a good paper. The guy who ran it grew up with the guy who runs the Times. They were childhood pals, so when it became obvious that the Globe needed help, he asked his friend to buy his paper. The two papers are similar in many ways, though the Times is The Big One and the Globe is next in line, so to speak. They have a virtually identical political prospective and some really excellent writers. It’s a class act. You cannot say this for our other newspaper, the Herald.

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          • Our LA Times is a part of the Chicago Tribune family that is currently and constantly involved in buying and selling. It has declined terribly over the past few years, to the point that I have considered dropping my subscription — but then I’d be stuck with the next-to-nothing Orange County Register and little local rags, so I hang on with the LA Times.

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            • I think that’s how the Globe made it back, though to be fair, Boston is a reading city, so it was down, but not quite out. If you are lucky, it’ll come back again. It’s pushing for internet access nationally (maybe internationally) and I think they will get it. the newspapers are just discovering that they don’t have to do it all in print. This bizarre political mess has been a real boon to the press, online and off.

              Like

            • This is another one where I read a lot. There has been this “thing” in American politics for a long time … at least 20, maybe 30 or more years. Everyone believes an “outsider” can fix it because “they aren’t part of the establishment.”

              It’s never been true. If you aren’t part of the establishment, you’ll never get your legislation through congress. Many presidents who were governors before being elected had a lot of trouble getting cooperation from congress — and they weren’t as totally bizarre as trump-o-matic. There is a way business gets done in any parliament or congress and has always been done. You give me something, I give you something, we both get something. The give-and-take of congress is the essence of how any democracy — yours or our or theirs — works. The most effective presidents were those who had a lot of markers from various other congressmen and it isn’t always money. In fact, it is rarely money but rather “I owe you for this one” and in the next round, they come through.

              It’s not evil. It’s just how its done and it was done that way back in Rome and Egypt. Nothing new under this sun.

              Even at the worst of times, the people running the government actually CARED about the American people. Greedy, maybe, but they certainly weren’t in it for the money. They were in it to try and do something worthwhile. Most of them were wealthy to begin with anyway, the the money was neither here nor there. Power hungry? Sure. Who else runs for president or prime minister? You have to have a drive to get there and do it and most people don’t have the will to even start the process.

              So it isn’t really that hard to get why people elected him. What’s a lot harder to figure out is why anyone trusted this moron to actually have some good ideas and care whether or not he helped anyone but himself and his rich pals. He certainly wasn’t in it because he wanted to help the people. He isn’t even sure who the people ARE and I believe he is too stupid to understand basic stuff like the constitution and how it’s supposed to work.

              I read history. Everyone says history is boring because it has nothing to do with reality. Well. Welcome to the real-time learning of history. The only reason he isn’t doing even MORE harm is that his party is in fragments and none of them LIKE him. It’s the single thing for which I am really grateful. They dislike him almost as much as I do.

              Liked by 1 person

              • You are one of the seemingly dying breed of intellectuals. I quite honestly believe you are correct on every point you made. People think Trump is “smart” because he was a businessman who worked his way to become president, however, his money did more for him than his intellect. He is not “smart” he simply is just good at getting what he wants and the majority of us Americans are too impulsive to perceive the future cause and effect relationships their actions cause. It is very important to read history, as you do, because history has a tendency to repeat itself and ignorance is the cause of such instances that could have been prevented. What is our future going to look like now that the king of ignorance is the chief executive? A man who cares more about money than he does logic. A man who acts before he thinks, and you know what? Sense history tends to repeat itself, how long is it going to be before another man of ignorance and greed gets elected as our present? Maybe I’m being pessimistic here but I don’t have much faith in most of my peers, and I predict another, perhaps even worse individual, will be our president not to far in the future.

                Liked by 1 person

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