GETTING YOUNG WITH THE DOG

The balls arrived. Eighteen of them in orange and red. Low bounce tennis balls, guaranteed the best for young tennis players and ball-addicted dogs. I bought the “low bounce” balls in the hope of saving some of my “stuff” from being shattered. Now, I see that we are going to have to put in bumpers to keep the ball from rolling under the table. Garry has been spending way too much time fishing the ball out from under the furniture.

I am patting myself on the back, albeit with a good deal of shoulder discomfort. I figured that Duke would be the only one of the three dogs with any interest in tennis balls … and I was right. Bonnie and Gibbs looked at them, looked at me, looked back at the ball. Looked at each other. If dogs could shrug, they have been doing it. They like stuffies, but balls don’t squeak. No matter how hard you shake them, they don’t play dead. They think toys make better friends.

He has torn out chunks of the first ball of the two I gave him. I’ve been explaining to him he should not eat the balls, but I’m not sure he’s listening. I actually don’t know where the second ball went. I’m betting it’s outside in the big, soggy yard.

Yes, folks, it’s raining again. Thunder. Lightning. Pouring rain. Duke isn’t exactly afraid of the thunder, but he definitely doesn’t want to go hang with it in the yard. I’ve had dogs crazy enough to race into the yard to bark down the storms.

Waiting for Duke

Bonnie hates the rain, but she loves sitting at the window and watching the wind and the weather. Gibbs isn’t afraid of storms, either. He doesn’t hide from thunder. Fireworks don’t bother any of them which is good since we have a shooting club just down the road. You can hear guns often … and they hunt these woods in the fall. Personally, I wish they were further away when they shoot, but at least it doesn’t make the dogs crazy.

Duke is making us younger, or at least, making us act younger. Garry has been crawling around the floor regularly. Retrieving balls, and toys. Grabbing sticks and the pieces of rocks Duke has dragged in. I was out in the yard yesterday and wondering how he got so many twigs piled up like that. There are no trees in the yard. Where did they come from? Wind? Or has he collected them from wherever he could find them in the yard?

Wherever they came from, he has made a nice pile of them in the approximate center of the property. It’s possible the sticks are his sheep and he is keeping them corralled.

Words from a wise old Scottie?

Duke is 15-months old, at the peak of adolescent dog lunacy. Soon, he will begin to level off. Meanwhile, he is funny, sweet, and smart. Alert to every movement. He watches your hands, watches your eyes. Except, like now, when having chased his ball around the living room, he’s sacked out.

And I’m pretty sure he’s working on computer literacy. Tune in. He’s readying his Facebook page.

25 thoughts on “GETTING YOUNG WITH THE DOG

  1. My dog likes squeaky, rubber balls, but only outdoors. And she is seriously freaked out by both thunder and fireworks. And she’s 12 years old. But other than that, she and Duke are two peas in a pod. (Not!)

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  2. You do sound like you are enjoying Duke so much. I hope the tennis balls last well. We used to have to buy them by the bag for Cindy. If she didn’t chomp them she would lose them in the river near the leash free park that David used to take her to. When she had done enough running she would go and jump in ball and all. We can’t go there now so it’s just the chomping.

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  3. Duke’s a keeper! πŸ™‚
    Saw a great Doggie doco on TV this week (seems there is something actually worth watching on TV still??) which said dogs have a practically unique capacity for eye-to-eye contact and understanding of our emotional and physical well-being and also can to a high degree see things through our perspective, they kind of see into our minds even better than our closest animal relatives, the apes, can. They are very eager to please us and will do so if we patiently explain ourselves plainly and simply (for them). πŸ™‚

    As for Duke’s stick-shepherding ability they did not explain that – sorry! πŸ™‚

    love

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    • I think he does understand and I think he also selectively doesn’t understand … when it suits him. He’s kind of charming, though. He’s attention is really intense. He watches our faces, our hands, everything. And each dog is different.

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  4. we have cats, and of course they insist on juggling every rolling toy (and many of the unrolly kind) under tables, chairs, the fridge, the couch, whatever.

    Get Garry his own personal small rake, the kind you get a kid when they decide they want to play garden, and instead of risking a dislocated whatsis, he can use the rake to do the hard work under couches and chairs and such. I have one that is long enough to reach all but the most firmly hidden toys, and the vacuum works a treat on such things as well.
    I fear for his back and yours, truly.

    Duke sounds like a welcome addition to the family although I have this image of Bonnie and Gibbs conferring seriously about it.

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    • I think it’s done in his left knee, actually. Today, he’s limping. We will have to wait until he has pushed ALL his toys under the coffee table and then get the dust mop (my favorite toy removal item) and get them all at once. I knew all that knee action was going to be a problem.

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