EXPLAIN SIMPLE BECAUSE NOTHING EVER SEEMS SIMPLE ANYMORE

WHAT DOES IT REALLY MEAN?


I’m looking at a bunch of repairs that this house needs while pondering questions about money. We don’t have anywhere near enough to even get started, so what to do?Take out a low-interest loan against the house to get the work done? Or struggle along without  money and hope nothing really bad happens?

Which of these is the simple answer? IS there a simple answer?

Winter in New England
Home in the fall

I don’t have an answer. Not even close to an answer.

Maybe we are a bit long in the tooth to take out long-term money? Yet there are so many things that need doing. I don’t know how else we could get them done.  Bathrooms, windows, floors. Almost everything needs at least a bit of work or repair.

Everyone talks about the simple life, but as mine rolls along, nothing is ever simple.

My world is not simple. It may look that way until you get into the details. After that, it’s endlessly complicated.

THE BIG MILITARY PARADE: A GARRY ARMSTRONG PRODUCTION

I can see it all.

Agent Orange will dress as a military general with lots of fruit on his shoulders when they hold his big parade.  I’m seeing Sterling Hayden and George C. Scott  (“Dr. Strangelove”) in this scenario.
Imagine, if you will, the wonderful, amazing “coming attractions” they could produce for this bigly event!

TRUMP: THE MAN, THE MYTH AND THE LEGEND 


2018/MGM-Warner Bros

Starring:

JOHN WAYNE, GARY COOPER, HENRY FONDA, ERNEST BORGNINE, ROBERT RYAN, LEE MARVIN, JOHN MILLS, JOHN GIELGUD, LAURENCE OLIVIER, PETER O’TOOLE, OMAR SHARIF, GERT FROBE,
RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH, STEVE McQUEEN, YUL BYRNNER, CHARLES BRONSON

With 

ROB GRONKOWSKI as “TRUMP”

A SAM PECKINPAH, OLIVER STONE PRODUCTION.

PATTERNS IN BLACK & WHITE

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge:
Outdoor – Patterns


Patterns are fun in black and white. You can really see the repetitions without the distraction of color. Textures and forms always seem at their best in monochrome.

Beacon Hill patterns
Patterns in a fence
Patterns in sepia – wall of the barn
Patterned chrysanthemum
Beacon Hill patterns
Patterns on Fenway park

DEATH BY TRAFFIC

When I lived in Boston, traffic was basic. It was as much “life” as getting up to go to work. I had audiobooks in the car to keep my brain engaged. Traffic was fundamental. You couldn’t go anywhere without adding that extra hour — in case traffic was bad. Traffic was usually bad, but sometimes, it was worse. These days, I don’t need to think about traffic because we don’t have it. We don’t commute. If we need to drive, we schedule it for when there is likely to be little or no traffic. Locally, a traffic jam is a tractor with two cars waiting at an intersection. Or road repairs.

Until we moved here, traffic was a major issue. It controlled our days. Road work in Boston could make it impossible to get from one side of the city to another. Gridlock before and during holidays could effectively close the city. I once tried to pick Garry up from work. It was less than a mile from home. Normally, he walked, but he had things to carry and so he asked me to come get him.

I left the parking lot, drove a block, and had to stop. Nothing was moving. An hour later, I was in the same place. I finally made a u-turn and went home to the apartment. It was before cell phones, so I had to call the guard at the front desk at Channel 7 and ask him to go outside and tell Garry I couldn’t get there. The next day it was in the papers and TV. The entire city had been gridlocked, the Friday before Christmas.

Less than a year later, we moved from Boston to Roxbury, about 4 miles outside downtown Boston. There were trees. Empty lots. Almost the suburbs. You could park — for free — on the street, as long as you remembered alternate side of the street parking.

Then came the Big Dig.

The Central Artery-Tunnel Project, called The Big Dig, was a monstrous project involving rerouting and redesigning virtually every road in, out, around, and through Boston. If you lived in the city, there were no areas unaffected by it. It was supposed to solve the city’s traffic disaster. Ultimately, it made it easier to get to the airport, but the rest of it? It’s still a permanent jam that will never go away. Was it worth it?

The Big Dig was the most expensive highway project in history. To absolutely no one’s surprise, it was plagued by cost overruns, scheduling disasters, water leakage, collapses of ceilings and other parts of roads and tunnels, impressive design flaws, blatantly poor workmanship, nepotism, corruption, payoffs, substandard materials, criminal arrests for a some of the aforementioned offenses (but not nearly enough), and four deaths.

The project was supposed to be finished by 1998 and cost $2.8 billion. I am sure no one in Boston expected it to cost that or be finished on schedule — and we were right. It took an additional nine years and was finally finished in December 2007  It cost more than $14.6 billion. The Boston Globe estimates when all is said and done, including interest and fines, lawsuits and so on, the project will total more than $22 billion and won’t be paid off until sometime in 2038. Or later.

The Big Dig drove us out of Boston. One day, I had to go grocery shopping. The supermarket was a mile away. It took me two hours to get there and another hour and a half to get home.

“Garry,” I said that evening, “Let’s get out of here!”

We did.

We fled Boston. Traffic had taken over our lives. We couldn’t go to a restaurant or a movie. We couldn’t shop, park, or get to or from work. People trying to visit us couldn’t find our condo because the exit to our neighborhood kept moving and was often closed. Out-of-towners roamed helplessly through Dorchester, looking in vain for a street sign or marker to give them a clue where to go. Maps and GPS were useless.

Sometimes we couldn’t find our way home. It was unnerving.

THE COST

I must have spent years of my life in traffic. By the time we slouched home, exhausted and beaten, we were wrecks.

Is there a solution to this? Not that I know of.

You don’t find good jobs in small towns or the country. We underestimate how seriously the wear and tear of commuting affects us. It wears us down physically. It tightens our backs and necks. When it take hours to get to work, you are already tired when you get there. Maybe it’s easier by train, but we haven’t lived anywhere with direct train — or even bus — service to where we worked, so we had to drive.

If not for the commuting, I might have survived longer in the work place, but it was hopeless. One day, something snapped. After that, no amount of pushing was going to keep me going. I was done. There were other reasons too … but if I hadn’t had that two to three-hour twice-a-day commute? I might have found a way to hang on. Traffic has a lot more to do with our survival than we think.

Work is easy. Commuting is a killer.

TRIPLE THREAT – THURSDAY’S SPECIAL

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: TRIO


From Paula:

Welcome to another Thursday’s Special event. Today you are invited to post a photo (or several) of a trio of some kind, be it animate or inanimate, the choice is yours. I will look at the entries next week. Have a great Thursday and weekend!


Three pigeons, sharing the top of the roof. Watching the party and having a little party of their own.jupiter najnajnoviji