THE CHANGING SEASONS – MARCH 2018 – GARRY & MARILYN ARMSTRONG

February ended and we all thought — especially me! — that spring was just around the corner. We’d had a lot of snow in January — with warm weeks in between. We had considerable snow in February — with even warmer weeks in between. This being March, I was waiting for the song of the Carolina sparrow.

THE FIRST STORM – March 2

It was mainly high wind and rain. We got a dusting of snow, but we also got the kind of heavy, drenching rain I usually associate with tropical storms and hurricanes. The first storm, on March 2, lasted almost three days — longer on some places along the shore.

For this “Changing Seasons,” I am here to show you the rest of the winter. Apparently winter was not wintry enough, so anything remaindered landed in March. We had three major nor’easters in less than two weeks.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

There is another possibly on the way, but none of the local meteorologists have quite figured out whether or not it is going to hit us or wander off into the Atlantic.

THE SECOND STORM – March 9

This was another heavy wind event with terribly high tides, massive shore erosion … and about 5 inches of snow, inland. The trees were moving in the wind which is more than a little frightening considering the size of these giant oak trees. The less I looked at them, the happier I was.

We didn’t lose power, but we were lucky. Across New England and New York, more than a million people lost power and some still have not yet been connected.

For all the dull months when we took very few pictures, we made up for it big time in March. Tons of snow, rapid melting. More snow. We don’t live on the coast or I could show you 50 foot high waves pounding the sea walls in Scituate (pron: Si-choo-ate) and everywhere along the cape, but especially in Bourne and Barnstable.

THE BIG ONE – THE THIRD STORM – March 13

The predictions for this one were a little different. A heavy blow of more wind along the shore, but massive quantities of snow for our area. in fact, Worcester won the cup — the most snow in the region.

Just under 28 inches.

Worcester beat out Uxbridge by less than half an inch getting a full 28 inches. We got 27.7 inches. It was a lot of heavy, wet snow. We didn’t get any of the wind and the trees groaned under the weight of the snow hanging in its branches.

Digging out

We both took pictures but even so, no one went very far. It was cold, the snow came down for a long, long time — almost 24 hours in total.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

March is by far the most erratic weather month in this region. March came in like a brace of hungry lions. I’m hoping he leaves us gently, trailing flowers. Right now, that seems unlikely.

All the early flowers were killed off by the brutal snow that followed the warming period. I think we will go from winter to almost summer during April. That isn’t unusual, either. In fact, it is more typical not otherwise.

Gibbs enjoying the snow

February is usually the worst month for blizzards and really heavy snow, but March takes the cup for 2018. Just because the month is more than half over, it’s too early to stow your winter gear.

The better news is there’s a lot of melting going on when the sun is out. It’s still cold, but not like it was earlier in the winter. We aren’t getting prolonged bouts of below zero (Farenheit) temperatures.

And, then, there was getting around after the snow. The towns are all good at cleaning up. We may not be good at a lot of other things, but we know how to clear the roads.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

Rules — not etched in stone:


Do you want to participate in «The Changing Seasons»?
These are the rules for Version 1 (The Changing Seasons V1):

  • Tag your posts with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons
  • Each month, post 5-20 photos in a gallery.
  • Don’t use photos from your archive. Only new shots.

These are the rules for Version 2 (The Changing Seasons V2):

    • Tag your posts with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons
    • Each month, post one photo (recipe, painting, drawing, whatever) that represents your interpretation of the month.
    • Don’t use archive stuff. Only new material!

Hosted this year by: Zimmerbitch – Age is just a number

27 thoughts on “THE CHANGING SEASONS – MARCH 2018 – GARRY & MARILYN ARMSTRONG”

    1. lESLIE, We took LOTS of pics over the past two weeks when we had FOUR nor’easters. Talk about “taking one in the kiester” times 4!!
      The TV weather folks are holding their cards on the next, impending nor’easter, due in a few days. They’re referring to “European Weather Models” in their technology. The European models apparently suggest the storm will miss us and head out to the Atlantic. Fingers crossed here.

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    2. I like that one too. It’s very personal too. How I see the snow, through my windows. Garry tend to get more “into” it with the shovel and dogs and all that. And it was beautiful. A bit late for my taste.

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  1. Marilyn, that was beautifully written. Honest to god, I loved it so much. “Brutal snow”, “Brace of hungry lions”. You made the snow live, wild ferocious, consuming. Yet your picture depict beauty along with the horrific amount of snow you deal with. Astounding that you could get that much snow in one place…the covered table tells the tail as well as the yard. It’s almost a snow fence holding back the tides of snow. I’m sorry it makes life difficult, getting around in particular. I’m touched at heart that you show what you deal with. Normally I’d say a picture paints a thousand words and they do, but your words are more profoundly depict the reality.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Whoa!! I’m going to have to stop complaining about our Winter out here. It was nothing compared to yours! And I’ve said before, Gibbs has the right idea. Inside, preferably on a soft warm blanket, viewing proceedings through a window is the BEST way to enjoy ‘winter’.

    On an unrelated note (and I realize you don’t ‘do’ awards and that’s just fine)

    I am supposed to notify you that I’ve nominated you for The Mystery Blogger award. This doesn’t require any action on your part, unless you’re interested in participating. If so, you can go to my post:
    http://sparksfromacombustiblemind.com/2018/03/18/award-time-2/
    and see what I’m talking about. Thanks for providing me with such interesting reading material all the same! 🙂

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    1. I appreciate it. I just finished your post, actually — like two minutes ago and left you a comment. It’s that these awards are really great when you are new at it because it is nice to get some appreciation. By the time you’ve been plugging away at it for six years, you figure the new kids will really appreciate the gesture. I’ll go back and take another look, though since this is a new one. haven’t seen this one before. They’ve changed over the past few years I think.

      I tell people “we get a lot of snow,” but I think they don’t understand exactly what I mean. It is some kind of configuration of the way the land lies in the valley and where the mountains and hills are placed, so the clouds come over the mountains, drop down toward the Worcester hill, then clobber us with tons of snow. We get MORE snow here than they do in Montreal and occasionally, we outdo northern Maine — and THEY get 12 feet or more every winter.

      I don’t hate the snow. I’m just getting too old and cranky to manage in it.

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    1. They won’t even plow unless it’s at least 4 or 5 inches deep. Actually, that’s the worst because left unplowed, it flattens out and turns to ice and while snow is pretty, ice is not so lovely. So for me, I want either a dusting — like yours — or enough to bring on the plows!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. And more is coming. MORE is coming. Even more.

      Garry says we are going to get the kind of spring where one day we are up to our butts in snow and the next day, the trees open — and every flower in the world blooms. We have seen this happen while we went grocery shopping. It was cold and gray but by the time we got home, it was 80 degrees and summer had arrived. Just — soon, please.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. A long lens helps a lot … and having a photographer husband who puts on six layers of outerwear and then freezes his hands numb to get the rest of the pictures. He REALLY doesn’t want to go out there … but it’s so pretty and the camera is weather-proof as is the lens. So he goes. One lens, one battery. I keep the lens cap in the house so he doesn’t have to twiddle with it. His hands will be frozen almost immediately.

      He gets some great pictures. Meanwhile, while I stay pretty close to the house, I have long lenses. And several doors and porches. Between the two of us, we get pictures. But you might notice … ALL the pictures are on our own property. This time, Garry didn’t take the camera into town. He just couldn’t get himself revved up.

      There was an awful lot of snow this month.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m so impressed by Garry braving the cold like that. I’m also pretty impressed that you can get that many great shots without leaving the property (or even the house). 🙂

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        1. It’s a pretty large property. Not huge, but not a city-style lot. When there’s serious weather, it can be interesting. But you’ll see the same tree configurations in dozens of my and Garry’s photos. The leaves and light change, but after a while, you’ll recognize the land 🙂

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