LIMERANCE AND TEENAGE OBSESSION – Marilyn Armstrong

One obsession. Once. A long time ago.

I was 16. Freshman college year. One boy, first time “doing it.” I think it was mutual. It certainly went on — against all odds — for about 20 years. It was very innocent in 1963. Less so with each passing year.

It’s funny, after so many years, how the details have disappeared. I remember that it happened, but I don’t remember what it was that was so obsessive, that had me in its clutches.

I only know it was a long time ago when all of me was young, healthy, and in a single piece with no replacement parts.

Obsession today is more like a worry I can’t get away from. Typically — these days it is something I know I need to do but don’t want to. Inevitably it has something to do with money. Everything else I can work through, but money is so inflexible.

1963

I discovered this morning I’d been hacked on another credit card. I didn’t know about it, but I was having trouble using it and it appeared the address on the card was wrong.

How do they do that? How do they manage to change my address and get away with it? I suppose they guessed the 3-digit code. If they have a little program, it can probably run all possible 3-digit codes in a computer’s heartbeat.

Otherwise? People are a part of my life or not. If they bother me or get under my skin, I don’t deal with them.

I’m not sure who I was at 16. Not me. Someone else, inhabiting what was sort of my body – back then.

10 thoughts on “LIMERANCE AND TEENAGE OBSESSION – Marilyn Armstrong”

    1. Actually, it was all ONE hack. I’m just still finding out about things I didn’t know about. But interestingly, it was just one bank controlling all three cards and they have all been very gracious about it. It’s infuriating because I can’t make it go away, but at least no one took what little money we have. That’s something. As for a target on my back, everyone who had the information given away by Facebook (don’t you love those advertisements?) is at risk. And basically, that’s anyone who ever used Facebook.

      MILLIONS of people. Actually, multi-millions of people.

      These guys aren’t done yet. If you don’t back up your data, do it. And if you don’t have a router with a protective patch, GET one. These guys are NOT finished. Not nearly. I’m not sure they will ever be done. They are hard to catch, almost exclusively far away from the U.S., and they move quickly.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. All beginnings have something special, although I would not call mine obsessions, just life as it happens. Your hackers seem to have your name on the list, they are obsessed. I still cannot access my mails on my Mac since the guy reorganised it all at the shop for the telephone. My iPad is working fine (although also Apple), my telephone and my Microsoft computer. I will have to visit the shop again net week.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Today’s discovery was part of the same hack. I just didn’t KNOW about it. If they get you once, it may take you a while to discover what they did. I have (I think) checked everything and as far as I can tell, they got ONE bank’s data — and I think they got it by hacking Amazon but I’m not sure — AND it all started on Facebook. There are millions of people like me here and on your side of the ocean. This hack was the same day — same HOUR — as the others. I just didn’t know about it.

      Like

  2. Lots of teen age obsesssions for a shy kid. Those heart achey ballads, I was sure, were meant for me and all the other “Mr. Lonelys”.

    These days — it’s health, bills, and the aches of old age. Then, there’s my life long obsession –beisbol. The Red Sox. Many a tear has to fall …but it’s all…all in the game of love.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. My gosh, how did they get ahold of your information? It’s down right scary. You’d think the credit card company would be looking into changes of address and checking it out.
    Leslie

    Like

    1. 1. Amazon sold my data to Cambridge Analytica.
      2. Cambridge Analytica sold my data to hackers — supported by the Russians.
      3. They had enough information to hack my router and get other information (it had already happened in Europe, but no one mentioned it here and by the time they did, it was a day late for me)
      4. They pretended to be a different company and had enough information to make me think they might be real. When they demanded money to protect my computer, I knew instantly who they were.
      5. They tried to steal money from one bank who controlled 3 credit separate cards. Two of them I knew about and stopped the transfers, so they never got any money. The final one I only discovered today, but again, I’m covered, so no loss to me.
      6. I had to rebuild my computer. From scratch. Which was actually not so bad — boring but not difficult — and because I back up my files, I was able to restore everything.
      7. Bought a new router with a protective patch.

      Does this mean they can’t get me — or you — again? Of course not. These hackers are a gigantic organization heavily funded by Russian money … and at the bottom of it all is Facebook.

      Facebook made this happen. Our government helped.

      Liked by 1 person

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