A BUSY DAY AT THE BIRD FEEDER – Marilyn Armstrong

I knew I would enjoy feeding the birds, but I had no idea how much I would enjoy having the morning display of every kind of local bird.  Not to mention some very stubborn squirrels who seem to have set up a residence.

In the name of surviving this experience, I went down a level in bird food quality. There’s an ugly rumor that birdseed is cheap. Cheap for the birds who get it for free, but at the rate they are chugging it down, we’ll all be eating birdseed before long.

The diving Chickadee

I wasn’t able to get some of the pictures I wanted. By the time I pressed the shutter, something had flown off or landed or disappeared into a tree or behind the feeder.

Same yellow warbler. Pine Warbler? A bit late for them to be this far north …

It was interesting how the squirrel in the flat feeder completely ignored the flocks of birds around the other feeder. Apparently, the squirrels and birds have established a non-military zone, otherwise known as “my back deck.” The squirrel feels that the flat feeder is his or her spot. The birds have strong feelings about the hanging feeder.

At other times, I have seen crows and squirrels go to war over a piece of roof, so a non-military zone is not a given, but apparently is working out for the time being.

The same yellow warbler

There were dizzying flights of birds around the feeder today and though I tried, I was only able to capture one of the birds actually flying off the feeder. The others always seemed to land or disappear from the range of the lens before I could capture them. What is so comforting is knowing that the feeder is there and where the feeder is, so the birds will be.

It’s an ongoing piece of natural theater. Does anyone know which of the many yellow warblers was hanging about today? There are many yellow and green warblers that spend time here especially in the fall and some live here all the time.

They look so much alike, that even with a picture and the book, I cannot tell which is which. Today’s warbler was yellow — almost gold — so it fits into the category of “Confusing Yellow Warblers” in the Peterson guide.

Not to forget that other warblers are brown and speckled and I don’t know their names, either. In any case, it’s very late in the year for any warblers to be here. By now, they all should have flown south to summer in warmer places.

Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Writer, photography, blogger. Previously, technical writer. I am retired and delighted to be so. May I live long and write frequently.

19 thoughts on “A BUSY DAY AT THE BIRD FEEDER – Marilyn Armstrong”

    1. In theory, we only get goldfinch in transit. They don’t LIVE here but pass through. It’s late for that. Actually, it’s late for ALL the finches, but that’s a finch, no doubt. It could be. Doesn’t seem likely, but the weather has been so weird, it’s hard to know.

      It could be a lady gold or the winter version. A bit far north, though. They shouldn’t be here in December.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Mine are on the back deck. No place to hang them in the front and I have a better chance of photographing them in the backyard. But they still totally transfix me. They are the first thing I look at in the morning and the next thing I look at when I am in the kitchen, starting the coffee. They make me forget everything I was supposed to do.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. You are getting some delightful visitors. I don’t have a feeder, the climate doesn’t really get cold enough to warrant it but now that I only have an inside cat I have really enjoyed the bird visitors.

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    1. You can put up a feeder. They like the feeders, even when they can get food themselves. Considering what we’ve done to the environment, what have you got to lose? You get to watch the flying show and the birds get fat and happy.

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