SERVICE DOGS FOR VETS – BY ELLIN CURLEY

I’ve always been fascinated by service dogs. I can barely get my dogs to sit, stay and come on command. So the idea that dogs can be trained to do complex tasks for the disabled seems like a miracle to me.

The Guide Dog Foundation For The Blind expanded in 2003 to include America’s VetDogs. This organization gives assistance to wounded veterans to help them return to a normal life. America’s VetDogs still shares staff and resources with the Guide Dog Foundation.

VetDogs provides service dogs to veterans who have a wide variety of disabilities and issues which prevent them from getting around independently. Service dogs help those with physical limitations, those who are blind or have low vision, those who are deaf and those who have PTSD.

Veterans who are paired with dogs go to the VetDogs ten-acre campus in Smithtown, New York, for a two-week, residential training program. The student and his or her dog bond and learn to work together as a team. The classes are small and there are lots of individual attention and instruction.

VetDogs has a wonderful Prison Puppy Program that allows prison inmates to train potential service dogs from early puppyhood. The prisoners also get invaluable benefits. I used to watch a TV series about prisoners training puppies and it was a joy to watch.

The inmates developed a sense of responsibility toward the dogs and a sense of accomplishment at their dogs’ progress. Puppies also create a calmer climate in correctional facilities and bring some normalcy to the prison environment.

Puppies get sent to the prisons at eight to nine weeks old. They live in the handler’s cell where the inmate works on house breaking and other basic skills. The dogs attend classes with their handlers, participate in recreational activities and even go to meals with their handlers. An American VetDogs instructor comes once a week to provide training instructions and monitor progress.

The inmates learn about canine socialization, puppy development, behavior theories, grooming, and canine first aid.

Prison handlers do more than teach basic obedience skills. They also train the dogs for service dog tasks, like retrieving dropped items, opening doors and refrigerators and providing support and balance on stairs. The prisoners also acclimate their dogs to objects in the outside world, like umbrellas, skateboards, and battery operated toys.

But a prison environment is limited. So the puppies go to the home of an outside family on weekends, often prison staff members. Here they learn house manners and they become familiar with cars and traffic noise. Dogs are taken to stores, restaurants, and hospitals so they can confidently go wherever their future veteran partner will take them.

When the puppies reach adulthood, the dogs go back to VetDogs for assessment, final training, and client matching. Statistics show that prison-raised dogs go through these final phases in half the time as home-raised dogs.

One dog trained in the prison program has become an overnight celebrity. His name is Sully and when he was two, in June of 2018, he was matched with former President George H.W. Bush.

Sully with Bush and Clinton

Bush, Sr. was always a dog lover and he welcomed Sully enthusiastically into his home and his heart. Sully helped Bush, who was in a wheelchair, pick up dropped items, open and close doors, push an emergency button and support him when the 94-year-old former president stood.

Sully developed a following on social media. His own Instagram account had more than 98,000 followers. Since George H.W. Bush’s death, Sully has become even more popular. A photo of Sully forlornly lying in front of Bush’s casket in the Capitol Rotunda went viral. Sully seemed heartbroken, but also seemed to still be keeping watch over his partner. His devotion exploded the internet.

Sully’s service to President Bush is over, but his career as a service dog is not. America’s VetDogs will send Sully to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. There he will assist with physical and occupational therapy for wounded soldiers. The Bush family found comfort in knowing that Sully would continue to help veterans for many years to come.

The relationship between President Bush and Sully has shined a spotlight on the amazing things that service dogs can do for people with physical and emotional limitations. Maybe Sully’s fifteen minutes of fame will result in more money being donated to training more dogs for civilians as well as for veterans.

It costs over $50,000 to breed, raise, train and place one assistance dog. And dogs are provided to veterans free of charge. America’s VetDogs is a non-profit organization so funding comes exclusively from donations.

So please donate to America’s VetDogs by going to their website. It’s a wonderful cause.

8 thoughts on “SERVICE DOGS FOR VETS – BY ELLIN CURLEY”

  1. I read a wonderful book called “Until Tuesday” by Luis Carlos Montalvan a couple of years ago. He was a veteran and he wrote the book about how his dog Tuesday had changed his life. I know that Tuesday had some of his initial training in the prison system and it seems a great way for the prisoners to give back to society and regain some dignity as well as being good for the dogs. I was very sad to recently read that Mr Montalvan had taken his own life, one can only imagine how hard life is for veterans who are in constant pain.
    After I had finished reading the book I sent it on to a close friend who has a Hearing Dog. In Australia, the Lions Clubs sponsor their training. Dusty helps my friend by alerting her to household sounds like the phone, microwave and washing machine but mostly by giving her confidence to go out alone as his presence makes people aware that she has hearing loss. Dusty is a terrier X who came from a shelter and people are often surprised to learn that service dogs are not all Labradors, although labs are great at it of course. It makes sense to match the size of the dog with the size and physical ability of the owner I think.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The book you reference sounds wonderful but the post script is very sad. I’m glad to hear that you know about the prison dog training program, which seems like a win win for everyone involved. Many tuypes of dogs can be good service dogs. Size may be important for blind people, who need to physically rely on and be led by their dogs. But other types of support dogs can be most mid size to large breeds. If you need a dog to open a refrigerator or push a button, he has to be tall enough to reach it. Emotional support dogs can be any size.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ellin I that is a great idea. Dogs can have such powerful and positive impact of people especially those with special needs. Happy New Year.
    Leslie

    Like

    1. Unconditional love helps everyone. Also the responsibility for another living creature gives your life purpose and structure. Good for everyone.Happy New Year to you too, Leslie! It’s been a pleasure communicating with you all year. Here’s to another great year together on Serendipity!

      Liked by 1 person

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