DAY LILIES AND BUDS: SUMMERTIME IN YE OLDE NEW ENGLANDE – Marilyn Armstrong

FOTD – July 3, 2019 – Daylily and buds

How did the daylily become our best classic summer flower. It grows everywhere.

You can see it by the sides of the road, in our gardens, in vacant lots and even in the woods.

You can see fancy Chinese ones sometimes, but the classic deep orange daylily rules New England in the heart of our summer.

We always have a lot of daylilies, but this year, I think we have EVEN more than usual … which is a lot of daylilies. Probably all the rain. This will be the first week we have gone more than two days without rain! The first time since … last August maybe?

Daylilies with blossoms, buds, and one big rusty tractor
More bud and daylilies — and part of the tractor
More buds, fewer daylilies

Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Writer, photography, blogger. Previously, technical writer. I am retired and delighted to be so. May I live long and write frequently.

20 thoughts on “DAY LILIES AND BUDS: SUMMERTIME IN YE OLDE NEW ENGLANDE – Marilyn Armstrong”

    1. Well, New England is the “oldest” white-settled area of North America. Along with a few contiguous parts that are now in Canada. It’s a lovely area, but terrible for farming. Bad soil, roots and rocks, and hard, iron-rich soil. Not a great start for farmers.

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  1. What a lovely display, Marilyn. You’ve got a very posh-looking classic summer flower in New England. You’d pay a fair bit for those over here. 🙂

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        1. They grow everywhere these days and apparently are also edible (they roast them in China and Korea). NO idea what they would taste like! They don’t even sell these anymore because if you want lilies, just drive around, find some, dig them up, and dump them in your trunk. Apparently, when families from the east coast were moving westward, they chopped the lilies into clumps, dumped them into the wagons and replanted them all of the west, so now they literally grow everywhere north of the 35th parallel. I don’t think they grow where it’s very hot, though … but I could be wrong. They are hardy enough.

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          1. I have successfully grown small ones of these (but still a decent sized flower) in a pot in our late Spring/early Summer but i think they’d really preferred to have been somewhere cooler! 😉

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    1. I’m thinking of adding some reblooming lilies to the mix so I’ll have the spring-summer bloom and an autumn bloom, too. But we’d have to move some of the lilies and they are not easy to move. DEEP and very hard roots.

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  2. I’d love to have some of those growing wild around here – what a terrific display! 🙂

    Another blogger (from England) has some growing in his garden that he posted recently and referred to them as hemerocallis as they are not ‘true’ lillies. As well as your colour he has red and deep burgundy ones! 🙂

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      1. Will be buying more plants in our Spring – i’ll look into it! 🙂

        You got extremely lucky it seems, so many beautiful flowers and big buds!

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