THE KOREAN WORD FOR BUTTERFLY by JAMES ZERNDT – Marilyn Armstrong

“Americans. They think everybody is snowflake. Only one snowflake. Only one you. But in Korea we think like snowball. Everybody snowball.” Yun-ji packed an imaginary snowball in her hands, then lifted it, palms up, as if offering Billie a present. “You see? Snowball.”

Both of them looked at Yun-ji’s hands holding nothing.

“Snowball,” Yun-ji repeated, then looked at Billie, at her unhappy mouth, at her face that looked like it had been bleached, and she pictured that soldier sitting in the tank, listening to headphones, maybe reading a Rolling Stone magazine, then the call coming in over the radio, the hurried attempts to think of an excuse, some reason why he didn’t see two fourteen-year-old girls walking down a deserted country road in South Korea.

“Never mind,” Yun-ji said and dropped her hands.

KoreanWordForButterfly

There are a lot of levels to this book. It’s a book about cultures and differences, but it’s also a book about the similarities that underlay human societies. In the end, our humanity trumps our differences and enables us to reach out to those who seem at first unreachable.

It’s about women and men, their relationships, their failure to communicate. The endless misunderstandings arising from these failed efforts — or failed through lack of effort. It’s also about the assumptions we make based on appearance and how terribly wrong are the deductions we make based on what we think we see. And how we use bad information to make our choices.  And finally, the pain that results from choices — even when the choices are the best available.

The story takes place in South Korea. Billie, a young American woman, is in the country to teach English to grade school children. She has come there with her friend, lover, and partner and shortly realizes she is pregnant. It’s the wrong in her life to have a baby and probably the worst possible place she could be.

She is far from her home and isolated by distance and culture. The story is told in the first person by Billie as well as two other first-person narrators, both South Korean.  Yun-ji is a young woman approximately the same age as Billie who also becomes pregnant and a man named Moon who is divorced and suffering through a painful separation from his son.

All the characters deal with problems springing from damaged relationships and miscommunication, misunderstanding, problems with parenting, pregnancy, and abortion. Despite cultural differences, in the end, the pain is personal and remarkably similar for each.

There are no simple, happy answers.

It’s well-written and held my interest from start to finish. Whether or not the book will resonate for you may depend on your age and stage in life’s journey. For me,  it was a trip back in time to the bad old days before Roe Vs. Wade. Of course, one of the issues made very clear in the book is that the legality of abortion doesn’t make it less of a gut-wrenching, life-altering decision. Anyone who thinks abortion is the easy way out should read this. Whatever else it is, it’s not easy.

It’s a good book. Strongly written, presenting highly controversial issues in a deeply human context.

The Korean Word for Butterfly is available in paperback and Kindle.

Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Opinionated writer with hopes for a better future for all of us!

9 thoughts on “THE KOREAN WORD FOR BUTTERFLY by JAMES ZERNDT – Marilyn Armstrong”

  1. I had to look up Roe v Wade when it came up on the Stephen Colbert show (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=re446t6p_6k) and I re-listened to the intelligent exchange once more. I’m just glad that there are still ppl out there with sound minds and able to express their views in a sensible, interesting and enlightening way. It would be a book up my alley, once I’ve read the roughly 240 I still have to read before (and before being totally blind). Thanks for that excellent post and happy hols.

    Like

    1. It’s a very good book. It didn’t get sold anywhere, but it’s probably available on Amazon since I think they published it. It was much better than most of the crap I have to read. In fact, so much of the stuff I had to read was truly garbage, I gave up reviewing for publishers. Now, I just review books I’ve read and enjoyed.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. It’s such a mixed bag. There some wonderful material, but there’s also a lot of stuff that should never have been published, not for free or for any reason. It’s hard to pick through it all and find a winner. This was one of the good ones. I do not know if he ever wrote another book.

          Liked by 1 person

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