JAPAN’S KIDNAPPING PROBLEM – BY ELLIN CURLEY

I recently wrote a blog about Japan’s strange (to us) cultural norms regarding women’s roles. The blog elicited a lot of interesting comments so I decided to follow up with another blog about a different cultural phenomenon in Japan that is even more appalling to Westerners.

Japan has a unique approach to child custody that differs from most of the rest of the developed world. Japan does not recognize the concept of ‘joint custody.’ Instead, courts give custody to one parent, applying what is called the ‘continuity principle.’ This states that if the child is settled in one household, the continuity of their care should not be disturbed. This, in turn, means that if one parent kidnaps a child, once the ‘new’ household is established, the court will consistently award custody to the kidnapper.

This bizarre system is deeply rooted in Japanese culture, where children are not viewed as having individual rights or even as ‘belonging’ to their parents. They are seen as the ‘property of the household’ where they live, so as soon as a child moves to a new household (say, with the kidnapping parent), the estranged parent automatically becomes an outsider with no right to ‘disturb’ the newly established household.

As a result (surprise, surprise), tens of thousands of Japanese children are kidnapped EACH YEAR, by one parent, usually the mother. And the other parent, usually the father, has no recourse to the authorities or the courts for help. Hundreds of these parents/fathers per year who are kept away from their children are foreigners who married Japanese citizens.

In one situation, an American man was married to a Japanese woman and they were living in Washington state. There was a divorce and the father was awarded custody. He dropped the six-year-old child off with his mother for a visit and she immediately took the child to Japan. The Japanese government refused to help him and, in fact, the Japanese embassy in Portland, Oregon actually helped the mother escape to Japan by getting her young child a passport in just one day.

Campaigns have been organized here, in other countries and even in Japan, to protect the rights of the outsider parents as well as the children. An American pressure group is called “Bring Abducted Children Home” and represents over 400 American parents whose kids have been abducted to Japan by a Japanese parent.

The Prime Minister of Italy and the President of France have raised this issue with Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, calling the situation ‘unacceptable.’ A formal complaint has also been filed with the United Nations’ Human Rights Council, arguing that Japan has violated the Convention on the Rights of Children and the Hague Convention on International Child Abduction.

But this only deals with the plights of foreign parents who are deprived of access to their children. Hundreds of thousands of Japanese parents are in the same boat.

Apparently, momentum for change is building domestically and internationally. This past February, Prime Minister Abe acknowledged that children would want to see both their parents, which is a huge concession and opens the door to giving rights to ‘outsider’ parents.

 

Also, the U.S. State Department says that progress is being made regarding enforcement of the Hague Convention on abductions since 32 kidnapped children have been returned to the U.S. since 2014. That’s just a drop in the bucket and more abductions are happening every year. But it is a step in the right direction.

In the meantime, it seems that the best policy for foreigners is to avoid marrying and having kids with a Japanese citizen until Japan joins the rest of the developed world in their views on custody and parental kidnapping.

9 thoughts on “JAPAN’S KIDNAPPING PROBLEM – BY ELLIN CURLEY”

  1. This is an interesting phenomenon. But the oriental culture is very different from western culture. It takes them centuries to change.

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    1. I hope the Japanese can change more quickly now because there are many gender issues that have to evolve for their society and their economy to work effectively.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I know very little about Japanese culture but what I’m learning is appalling. From their death by overwork culture to their onerous expectations for women, particularly mothers, to this bizarre phenomenon of kidnapping, it all seems very dysfunctional.

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      1. It sounds just like home to me. Garry used to work 14 to 16 hours a day between five and seven days a week. Yes, he got overtime, but he looked like a skeleton. I think drinking was the only pleasure he had in life. I wasn’t having a lot of fun either. By the time he staggered home, all that was left was sleep and even on weekends, all he did was sleep. And it just kept getting worse.

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  2. I can see an argument for continuity but what is to stop the other parent from kidnapping the child back? The child’s wishes should be respected.
    Leslie

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    1. My best idea is to not have children until you are sure the marriage is on firm footing and to discuss these matters BEFORE the baby. I often think if people talked to each other, a lot of problems would go away.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Marilyn, our daughter waited 10 years before having our granddaughter. She waited until she thought she was sure he had smartened up and was committed. One never knows but hopes against all odds.
        Leslie

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