STONES AND GLASS HOUSES – Marilyn Armstrong

Fandango’s February Expressions #16


PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN GLASS HOUSES
SHOULD NOT THROW STONES.


For years, Garry had a thing about westerns. “Why,” he asked, “Do they always break the windows? Don’t they realize how expensive reglazing is? Can’t they just open the window?”

A friend from Texas felt it was the drama of the breaking glass. “Shattering glass gets the audience’s attention,” he said. It certainly always got mine.

I have never lived in a glass-house, but I have lived in houses that contained a lot of glass. I admit I was very careful about throwing things — and not just rocks. Pottery, books, old dysfunctional cell phones, blocks, tools — anything hard was a no-no. Especially when it came to really BIG windows, you can easily spend a month’s salary getting someone out to your place just to give an estimate much less repair the damage!

So should I ever be unlucky enough to live in a glass house — which I would rather not do since it would require I always be dressed and make would make showering treacherous, I would definitely hold back on any casual stone-throwing. Unless I was making a movie. Then I’d fling stones to my heart content.

Because we want the viewers to feel more involved!

Author: Marilyn Armstrong

Opinionated writer with hopes for a better future for all plus a big helping of cynicism.

16 thoughts on “STONES AND GLASS HOUSES – Marilyn Armstrong”

  1. Our new house has a lot of windows and sliding glass doors. The window treatments we ordered are still two-plus weeks away from delivery. I feel like my wife and I are living in a glass house. I’m not so much worried about stones as I am about putting on a show for our new neighbors! 😱

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    1. Fortunately, our two big windows are on shaded parts of the house. To be fair, the entire house is shady, so you don’t get hot unless you go outside. That’s when you notice the heat.

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        1. We don’t have a real cross-draft in this house, so while we don’t need MUCH air conditioning, we always need some. Otherwise, the heat from downstairs rises up here and the windows just don’t allow air to move the hot air out. Who knew ventilations would be such an issue? The house looked so normal.

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          1. My house in Geeveston had high ceilings in most of the house and I rarely used the air-con unless it was really hot. On the other hand I used the heater a lot. I suspect that here it will be the other way around. Of course Geeveston is in southern Tasmania and much colder than here on the coast. We’ve been surprised by the humidity.

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            1. The weather is changing. Everywhere. We haven’t had even a single really cold week all winter. Or any snow. I don’t mind not having snow, but I worry what the lack of cold is going to mean for the summer coming up.

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    1. We have two big windows — the French doors in the dining room and the picture window in the living room. My REAL issue with them is that they are impossible to clean. The doors are doable, but the big window isn’t.

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        1. I’m a saver. If ANYTHING can be used again, I try to find a way to use it. I feel worst about replacing pots and pans. At some point, they get so scarred, I can’t get them clean. They burn and stick constantly. There ought be something you can do with an old steel pan. I just don’t know what. if it was deeper, it could be a flower pot, but a pan?

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