SHARING WHAT REMAINS OF MY WORLD – Marilyn Armstrong

Even though my life is pretty much unchanged, it doesn’t feel the same as it used to. The world feels threatening and hostile. Rumors to the contrary notwithstanding, there is very little helpfulness or cooperation around here. No one delivers, prices have gone up on everything except gasoline, and they still don’t have toilet paper or tissues. No one has offered any help at all.

Maybe it’s because we are so rural. We don’t have “neighbors” in the usual sense. They are a considerable distance away. We have no public transportation, so you can’t go anywhere if you don’t drive. Garry isn’t feeling well and I don’t know whether to start panicking now or wait until he feels worse.

The world is going to change. I don’t know exactly how and I don’t know if I will be around long enough to find out, either.

Don’t you love advertisements from Cadillac about “How we’ve been through hard times before”? These are people who don’t know what a hard time is and probably never will. Their idea of a hard time is what most of us call an inconvenience.


Share Your World 03-30-2020

QUESTIONS:


Pancakes, waffles or French Toast as your breakfast favorite? 

Regular toast, preferably cinnamon with cream cheese.

Do you think a person’s name influences the person they become?

Unless you’re a boy named Sue, not really.

Would things get better or worse if humans focused on what was going well rather than what’s going wrong?

That is one of my least favorite cliches. You can do something else rather than focusing on what’s wrong, assuming what’s wrong isn’t you being evicted from your home or fired from your job … or dying of a disease. I can wrap myself in photography or books, but often when things aren’t going well, it is extremely difficult (mostly impossible) to focus on other parts of your life that appear to be going better. This is probably because “things going bad” feels like a piano falling four stories on your head, but things going well feels kind of normal.

Right now, nothing is going particularly well. Whatever was wrong before had stayed wrong while a whole lot more stuff has gotten much wronger.

Is math(s) something that humans created or something we discovered? Is looking at reality mathematically an accurate representation of how things work?

Some people think in numbers. I am not one of them. But people who think in numbers often wonder why we need words. I think they are the descendants of those who came in flying saucers.

As for gratitude?

We have enough toilet paper until hopefully it gets restocked in the grocery.

22 thoughts on “SHARING WHAT REMAINS OF MY WORLD – Marilyn Armstrong

  1. I’ve known people who think in numbers. They freak me out.
    My local shop is quite well stocked fortunately but I’ve also ordered some bits and bobs online (like proper cheese). I hope Garry’s feeling better soon!

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  2. what a diverse wealth of info here. The TP saga is obviously not getting better – a fact I can confirm on our home turf now.
    The name thing made me laugh out loud. But then I also didn’t know there was a song about a boy named Sue. Made me think of a small booklet I once bought 2nd hand with silly poems for children by an English author. I just re-read it and was stunned to see how many of them were absolutely transportable into this ‘new time’ – then they were just considered to be silly stuff for children. Reality has taken over fiction. Scary!
    I’m so sorry to hear of Garry’s health problems. That’s not what you need right now…. I’m also a bit worried for our situation.
    As we moved here, coming from abroad, our health insurance stopped at the end of February.
    In Switzerland you have to look for insurance yourself, it’s not, like in many other countries, a state ‘commodity’. France in that respect was outstanding. So, I did countless researches online, many phone calls and finally, once you have decided on your future health insurance company, you have to choose one of the doctors on THEIR list and obviously, the one(s) you’d like to choose are not accepting new members… I struggled finally to get us on a doctor’s list ONCE we’ll have a confirmation of our chosen health insurance. Meanwhile we hope that nothing untowards is hitting us – if not – (well, it doesn’t bear thinking about).
    Please give Garry my best well-wishes. Keep him close to you, tell the dogs giving him cuddles, fill him with tea or stronger stuff… You mustn’t be ill, neither of you….

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    • He doesn’t have a fever, so until he raises a fever, I’m still breathing. I am absolutely 100% certain that when the virus is done, everyone is just going back to work. I don’t how it will change, though I have some thoughts on it. But it won’t be the way it was. Probably, that’s a good thing. I didn’t like it anyway.

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  3. Hey Marilyn, Our world is pretty creaky at the moment. My son arrived today with his mask on, sick as a dog. Scary. Doc said he still wasn’t sick enough to meet standards for coronavirus test because his fever is 0ny 99.7. Had to leave behind wife and four month-old daughter, but it was not a hard decision. Little Hazelbutt is so beautiful and innocent. Hospital told Nate (my son) they only have 22 tests a day to administer so he had to wait… and if he has it, he will be sick before his trst us available. Not sure what is means, but a “standard: test for virus infection shows he has a virus infection. That is our world today.

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    • Garry is sick too. I don’t know if it’s a cold or the beginning of something worse, but at 77, it’s pretty scary. I don’t go out at all. I’ve had major heart surgery and cancer twice AND asthma, so I figure you can’t get a whole lot more vulnerable than I am. But inside this house, if one of us has it, we all have it. So far, no fever. But even if he does, what can we do? We are in Worcester county (the middle of nowhere New England) and it’s rural here. We only have ONE major hospital and I don’t think they have tests of ventilators or much of anything. They are very big because they are this county’s version of UMass hosptial and it contains the medical school, but it was never set up to have a lot of beds. If you want a real hospital, it’s Boston — 75 miles away.

      I was going to call the doctor, but realized there was no point. All they would do is tell him to stay home, which he has been doing anyway except for two trips to the grocery store since the middle of March. You can’t get more stay at home than that.

      I’ve been reading about previous epidemics and have always been very involved in the 14th century, but I think the flu of 1918 was even worse. I think the governments of the world all think that when this is over, we’ll just go back to “the way things were.”

      We won’t. We never have. Epidemics change history, change world history and this one will do that do. Exactly how it will change things? I don’t know nor does anyone else. The one thing I know is that yesterday isn’t coming back. It won’t be a world we recognize.

      So, I write. Because that’s what is left to do. Meanwhile, to keep my sanity, I’m reading Eric Idle’s Sortabiography. We needed a laugh.

      I hope your son gets better. We are truly the lost generation.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. So sorry to hear Garry’s not feeling well and hoping it’s something other than what the president said was hoax — just a month ago. But I digress. Life will not return to normal. What the new normal will look like will be shaped by whether we, the American people, find each other again in ways that level that playing field — the mighty come down from their thrones, and the rest of us learn to love our neighbors as ourselves. You and Garry should not be left alone to fend for yourselves. Maybe, just maybe, a new commonwealth will rise from the ashes of the old one.

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    • Well, that is what has happened after each previous epidemic. The world is never the same and yesterday doesn’t come back. I don’t know if we will live long enough to see the changes, but change there will be. I think Garry just has a cold or it’s his endless battle with spring allergies. I sure do hope so!

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      • I sure hope so, too, Marilyn, i.e. about Garry’s cold. Is William Barber II on your radar screen? Since you’re all cooped up, you might find company in Barber and his organization’s FB page. No one need be a FB prisoner to get on the site. Poor People’s March scheduled for June 1 has been transformed into digital. Here’s the link: https://www.facebook.com/anewppc/

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  5. Thanks Marilyn for Sharing Your World! I’m sorry your piece of the world is so grim right now and here’s hoping things improve drastically for you and for Garry. The photo of the birds was certainly uplifting! 🙂 Here they have t.p., although they are still guarding it against the hoarders, and they restock a little every day. I’m really sorry they aren’t doing that up your way! Boy Named Sue? 😆 I haven’t thought about that song in some time! Thanks for the reminder and the smile! 🙂

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    • I just watched a biography of Johnny Cash, so it was sort of on my mind. It’s going to be a different world, if not instantly, then soon. But I don’t know how it will change. I’m hoping Garry just has a cold. There’s not much to do anyway. We are rural, there are few hospital beds and nowhere near enough tests so all they will do is tell him to stay in, which he has been doing anyway.

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  6. One aspect of this whole situation is the emotional and mental impact it has. They are warning (particularly in the case of teens) that the isolation and inability to be free means we are all going to go through the grieving process…more so those that are in serious straights like New Orleans and New York. I’ve given up on watching much that relates to the coronavirus. It’s completely overwhelming. I understand how concerning it is, especially when there isn’t anyone to offer assistance. I sincerely hope Garry is feeling better soon and in the meantime, please keep in touch. I love you. I know that seems strange since we’ve only been in contact for a short while and only online, but you’re a very dear couple and very special.

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    • So far, so good. Lots of cold symptoms, but no fever. We’ll just have to wait and see. There really isn’t much else TO do. There aren’t nearly enough tests and unless you are nearly dead, the hospital (there’s only one “real” hospital in this county) is closed. The doctor is closed, but he’ll call you back. There are lots of phoners available, but no place to go if you are really sick.

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      • We are in the same boat. One hospital for most of the island. I was to see a skin specialist but they cancelled and said take pics. to which I laughed. NOt in these particular areas, um no. Did a phone consult anyway and I’m on prednizone for 20 days to try and calm everything down to sort out what’s happening.

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  7. I can understand your feelings Marilyn. Stay safe and I do hope your worries go away. They are stocking tp here but it gets sold out early in the day.

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    • I managed to snag the very last Charmin (24 rolls) collection, so we are okay for now. I wish we had a functional hospital with tests and doctors and all, but that’s how it is almost everywhere, including Boston where the REALLY big hospitals are. So we have TP, but not much medical care. Life is funny sometimes.

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  8. Pingback: SHARING WHAT REMAINS OF MY WORLD – Marilyn Armstrong — Serendipity Seeking Intelligent Life on Earth – Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

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