Witchcraft in the time of magic…

Women in western society seem to always pay a heavy price for doing the right thing. It seems that things never really change. A great article about wise women — the witchy women who knew the herbs and natural medicines of the world — and instead of getting the applause they deserved, were punished.

For most of us, any mention of historical witchcraft will conjure images of the large-scale witch-hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when countless innocent women met an untimely end at the hands of their paranoid accusers. But it’s easy to overlook the fact that the ancient magical arts had been around for many centuries, long before the rot of religiously-driven mass hysteria set in. For much of the Middle Ages magic was a part of everyday life for the common folk, practiced by both men and women in communities throughout Europe, while elements of the supernatural were harnessed by scientists and physicians, and featured in all levels of society including the nobility and even kings. This was a time when the boundaries between science and witchcraft were blurred, and it was believed there were people who could cast spells and use magic for good or evil. Although there were…

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Categories: Anecdote

3 replies

  1. Thanks for the reblog Marilyn – as always, much appreciated. Hope you had a good Halloween, here’s to the witches that made the ultimate sacrifice for trying to help people. As you rightly say, some things never change.

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    • It’s sad how we keep going backward. Infuriating, too. Instead of learning from these great women, the men still feel obliged to control the world and they are doing a really crappy job, too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Absolutely right, Marilyn. Couldn’t agree more. You’d think after all this time we might have learned how not to go backwards, but it seems not to be the case.

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