THE HELL OF GETTING HACKED

Another rerun that’s strangely timely — from earlier this year (but I forgot I published it, so you problem don’t remember reading it) — this was Fandango’s Provocative Question #127


Let me start with a rerun of the post I wrote when we got hacked in 2018. Not surprisingly, it was called “HACKED.” Actually, there were two of them: “HACKED AND HATING IT” and the next day, “HACKED.”

Like many other people, I assumed no one would bother to hack us because we have no money. We have an almost empty savings account and an income that hasn’t gone up in more than ten years. Living on Social Security is not fun and gets less fun with every passing year. Your income stays the same. Only prices go up.

The thing is, hackers get lists of hackable names and personal information from all kinds of places. You should not be surprised to learn that your personal information is for sale just about everywhere, from your grocery store to your bank. You know those little “discount cards” you get at many shops? You don’t get the discounts if you don’t have the card? I do my best to never shop anywhere that requires you have their “special” card.

Each card creates a list about you. Everything you buy at any of the stores that use one of those cards moves information about you to a list which gets sold to whoever has the money to buy it. In theory, the people who sell data are supposed to know who they are selling to, but mine was sold by Facebook. It wasn’t hacked. They sold it to “Cambridge Analytica” — a major Boston-based hacking company who then resold the data to anyone with the money to buy it.

It’s why I don’t use Facebook. At all. I tried to actually close the account, but even if you close it, if someone sends you a message — whether you read it or not — they automatically re-open the account. Regardless, we are ALL hackable. We have credit cards, even if the card is just an ATM card. And even if our account is empty, that does NOT mean you won’t get hacked because hackers are thieves. When they couldn’t get me to pay them, they locked up my computer.

I unlocked my computer. I reported it all to the police, but it wasn’t like I was counting on the Uxbridge Police to solve an international hacking problem. This group had hacked people all over Europe and Asia. By the time they started reporting the problem here, it was too late for many of us. Eventually Facebook “apologized.” It was a single paragraph saying “oops.” Their “oops” had resulted in five hacked credit cards and a locked computer I had to restore.

I did restore it. It took an entire day and then I had to replace all the applications on it.

In the course of the past three or four years, every place with which I have done business was hacked. Lands’ End. L.L. Bean. Bank of America. Adobe. UMass Memorial Hospital. Amazon. PayPal. Facebook. Even when I don’t know if a company has been hacked, I assume it has been because they don’t always tell us — and when they do, it’s a couple of paragraphs in a little email you could easily miss — months or years after the hacking event.

I can’t remember all the places because there have been so many. Suffice to say, almost everything has been hacked including Experian, the people who are supposed to be protecting us from hackers.

I don’t know whether or not smart phones or cell phones or any telephone is more susceptible to hacking then are routers and computers. Moreover, so much of the data in our world lives in “clouds” that live on servers that do not belong to us and are owned by massive corporations who control our online lives. Our email — no matter who we use — saves our mail in their “clouds.” So does Amazon. And, for that matter, everything and everyone else.

What can you do?

First? Don’t assume you can’t get hacked. You can and if you aren’t paying attention, you might not even realize it happened until suddenly you get a bill far too high.

Now, are cell phones — smart phones — more or less likely to be hacked than any other wi-fi connected device? Some say they are less hackable, others say the opposite. I don’t know. I’ll just assume everything can be hacked.

I no longer answer my “landline” which is, in any case, NOT a landline but a VOIP wi-fi connection. I can’t begin to tell you how much better my life is since I stopped taking calls unless I recognize the name of the person or company on the line.

I protect my iPhone to the best of my ability, but I know for a fact that my ability to protect it is not nearly enough. if someone wants to get me, they will get me. There are so many ways and the phone is just one of many.

What do I use my phone for? I use it as a telephone because it has better sound than the VOIP line. I play Solitaire on it. I get texts telling me my prescriptions are ready and I talk to my doctor. I have a Travelon RFID bag that supposedly stops hackers from reading the contents of my wallet. Does it work? Who knows?

None of these precautions are a guarantee. They don’t even have to hack ME. They can hack anyone with whom I’ve done business. Since the lockdown, we’ve all done a lot of online business. What else could you do?

Until such time as our ability to stop hackers exceeds the hackers’ ability to access our data, we are in peril. The new tools don’t add any significant additional vulnerability to those we already had. If they have your number — or one of your many numbers — they can get you.

Do not assume that poverty or living a small life means you won’t get hacked. These are hardboiled thieves. If you have a few dollars anywhere, they will steal it.

Moreover, there so so many ways hackers can access your data. Short of living without a computer and wi-fi — and never shopping online or having an account (like electricity, a bank account, and a medical record) that lives online and can be accessed — you are vulnerable. We are all vulnerable.

There is no place to hide.



Categories: Anecdote, Computers, database, hacking, Hacking, Photography, Software, Technology, Telephone, Wi-Fi

Tags: , , , , ,

8 replies

  1. The day I realized there is no 100% privacy was the day the Police called my grandmother’s landline phone back in the 80s and asked me to go to the house next door to check on our elderly neighbor. At first I did not believe it was the police. How did they know my grandmother’s phone number. I thought it was a friend playing a joke. They gave me the number of the police station and I called them back. It was the 77th St. Division. Someone had reported that they could not reach the elderly lady next door and thought she may have fallen. I did go there and she had fallen. Since then I believe that if someone wants to invade your privacy, they can and will.

    Like

    • Our personal information is not hard to get. It’s in the records of the electric company, the telephone company, every place we have ever bought something and used their “special discount card” for a discount, we go into a record of people on a list that can — and WILL — be sold to anyone with the money to buy it. I know because I worked in a place that was designing one of these systems. I had no idea what a horror these applications would become in years to come. I’m pretty sure the people designing it only thought it was a useful tool to help sales. Another “good idea” gone wildly awry.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m sure I’ve read that before. But as you say, it’s still the same story, it’s still valid. And I don’t know if I do myelf a favour saying: I don’t care. I have nothing to hide…. or if I’m just letting my arms hang down at my sides because whatever I could think of doing is ‘useless’ – if anybody wants to hack us, they do and can…

    Like

    • That’s exactly the attitude that got us hacked. Just be careful where you buy and check your credit cards — or bank card — and make sure there’s nothing out of line. They often try to do something small as a test and then big things. Fortunately, most banks protect their cards, so while it was very inconvenient and thoroughly unpleasant, in the end we didn’t lose any money. It was still a horror show.

      Like

      • I’m one of the last ppl in this country to always ask for a paper receipt for any shopping. AND I control every monthly bill, every statement. More often than I’d like to see there are errors, always easily explained but I just want to make sure that ‘they’ know they’re controlled. I also check my shopping bills. Always. It’s interesting that shops seldom or never cheat on themselves.

        Like

  3. You are right, Marilyn, everyone and anyone can get hacked and / or scammed. That is the nature of our on-line world.

    Like

Talk to me!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Light Motifs II

Paula Light's Writing Site | The Classic Edition

Soul N Spirit

Seeking happiness in the psalms of life……

Touring My Backyard

Rediscovering Singapore

Our Eyes Open

Come along on an adventure with us!

Travel with me

Travel snapshots from Toonsarah

Thoughts & Theories

My Personal Rants, Ravings, & Ruminations

France & Vincent

Writing Magic, Myth and Mystery

Barb Taub

Writing & Coffee. Especially coffee.

This, That, and The Other

Random musings on life, society, and politics.

Keep it alive

A look at life, achieving good physical and mental health and happiness

Covert Novelist

Light Hearted Mysteries

Salted Caramel

Blogging, Motivation, Lifestyle and much more.

Sarah's Attic Of Treasures

Making My Home A Haven is important to me. Sharing homemaking skills. Recipes and food. Bible Studies. This is a treasure chest of goodies. So take a seat. Have a glass of tea and enjoy. You will learn all about who I am.

Green Screen

The Environmental Movie Podcast

bushboys world

Photos of my world and other stuff I hope you will enjoy too. Photos taken with Canon PowershotSX70HS Photos can be purchased.

musingsofanoldfart

Independent views from someone who offers some historical context

My Blog

Just another WordPress.com site

National Day Calendar

Fun, unusual and forgotten designations on our calendar.

Cee's Photo Challenges

Teaching the art of composition for photography.

Trent's World (the Blog)

Random Ramblings and Reviews from Trent P. McDonald

Views from the Edge

To See More Clearly

serial monography: forgottenman's ruminations

wandering discourse, pedantic rant, self-indulgent drivel, languorous polemic, grammarian's bête noire, poesy encroachment approaching bombast, unintended subtext in otherwise intentional context, unorthodox unorthodoxy, self-inflected rodomontade, …

draliman on life

Because sometimes life just makes you stop and think

The English Professor at Large

Posts about old Hollywood, current concerns

Sparks From A Combustible Mind

EMBERS FROM SOMEONE DOGGEDLY TRYING TO MAKE SENSE OF IT ALL...

THE SHINBONE STAR

NO LONGER ENCUMBERED BY ANY SENSE OF FAIR PLAY, EX-JOURNALISTS RETURN TO ACTIVE DUTY TO FIGHT THE TRUMPIAN MENACE!

Chronicles of an Anglo Swiss

Welcome to the Anglo Swiss World

ScienceSwitch

Your Source For The Coolest Science Stories

%d bloggers like this: