BLUE JAYS IN THE SNOW

We didn’t see them all summer. Some unknown fungus was making them sick — and blind. A blind bird is not a pretty sight, so I was relieved when late in the fall, a couple of Blue Jays showed up. During the past week, we’ve gotten many more. It’s good to have them back.

Feathers must be warmer than they look!



Categories: Anecdote, Birds, blue jay, Gallery, Photography

Tags: , , , ,

9 replies

  1. Such pretty birds, and very different from our own jays!

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  2. They are looking so wonderful. Its a shame, here in Germany there are only some blue tits, bringing color into life. All other birds are dark colored, like they are wearing camouflage. 😉 xx Michael

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    • Well, our grackles are considered black birds, but if they are in sunlight, they look like a rainbow. Your tits are the equivalent of our finches — and I think they are the same family. I have a friend in Switzerland and she gets European Robins and Yellow Tits. But birds have defined areas, and sometimes, the birds you see in on state aren’t one state over. That’s also true of other small animals. We get “Southern Flying Squirrels” — but if we drove to the top of Massachusetts, they get both the Southern and Northern flyers. And that’s just 30 miles.

      Do you feed your birds? I had NO idea what birds were living in our woods until I started feeding them. I was truly astonished. I had no idea we had those birds here. I’d never seen them until I put out feeders — and found the right foods.

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  3. of all of the pretty birds in Australia, we have been adopted by a crow. We have named him Claude. Is Claude someone’s pet, or a cunning wild crow who has found that mooching is an easier pastime to get a feed, Claude comes to me and takes small pieces of cheese from my fingers very gently. If I try to touch him he pecks me. I love watching his antics like taking some pots and pulling them apart then running after them when they roll in a circle. I gave him an egg yesterday and watched as he shifted this while he pecked it hard until he had a hole he could suck the insides out of. I was talking to the old 96-year-old neighbor about him, he was drizzling about Claude taking one of his chicken’s eggs every morning qt four cents each he is not going to go bust. I suggested he feed Claude. I think the old coot is too miserable.

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    • Crows ARE very smart. They may be the smartest of all the wild birds, though there are some parrots and cockatoos who might be in the competition too. He might have been a pet since he is so unafraid of you. That’s really interesting. A lot of our birds are not afraid of us, but I’ve avoided hand feeding them because I’m afraid they will forget to be wild and one day, I won’t be here and they will need to remember how to be wild again. But I do love when the land on my shoulder when I fill the feeders. They know us well enough to not fear us. Even when I yell at the grackles, the small birds don’t leave — just the grackles. The grackles think we are dangerous, but the little birds know we aren’t.

      Do you have any pictures? I’d love to see some!

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