V IS FOR VIOLET

FOTD – October 5 – Violets

I could have included Virginia Creeper but I have a serious spite on vines, especially the strangling kind. Although Virginia Creeper isn’t nearly as awful as wild grape vine which will climb through your window during the night and strangle you in your sleep. Just saying

These are wild violets. There are cultivated violets that look the same, but grow in a tighter bundle. The come in three colors: Violet, blue, and white. They are also a bit taller. But all of them are genetically the same as these forest violets. All require the same growing conditions — shady, moist, well-drained soil.

It was too dry this spring to get our usual mass array of violets, but maybe next spring they will be back fullforce.



Categories: #Flowers, #FOTD, #gallery, Cee's Photo Challenge, Flower of the day, Gardens

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14 replies

  1. Beautiful violets for today 😀 😀

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  2. In high school, there was one girl named Violet. The only Violet I have ever known. I think that is such a pretty and old-fashioned name. Your wild violets are so pretty.

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  3. beautiful color!

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    • They aren’t all the same color, either. Some are much redder, others more purple and a few are almost white — maybe cream? When we aren’t in a drought, they take over the lawns for about a month in March and/or April. Mixed with dandelions, they are a great combo.

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  4. A fabulous burst of purple to brighten up my rather dull day, Marilyn (it’s all packing, chasing solicitors and more packing), and the wild violets look even more lovely than the cultivated variety. I have to say, also, that the idea of a wild grape vine with homicidal tendencies has all the makings of a great creepy story – it certainly gave me a shiver or two! 🙂

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    • If you saw our vines, it would be even creepier. These vines originated down south in warner states and have been inching up the east coast since I was a child. They took over the woods around the house I lived in in New York, but they only arrived up here in the past ten years. Now, they are HUGE, ugly and develop stalks so tough you can’t even cut them down. Not beautiful AND even the deer won’t eat them. Very creepy for real.

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      • Creeper by name and creepy by nature it seems! I was thinking of growing a creeper up the walls of our new house when we get there, but I’m having second thoughts now! :-0

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        • Some vines are safe, but others — like trumpet vines — are notorious for destroying mortar, window frames, and anything else it gets into. There ARE safe vines, but talk to someone who works with vines FIRST. Finding out later can be very expensive.

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          • Good advice, Marilyn, thanks for that. Your post was very timely then! 👍😊

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            • I was warned especially about trumpet vines when we first moved here. I was grateful myself because I didn’t know much of anything about outdoor gardening. I still don’t know nearly as much as I should.

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  5. Precious things often come in delightfully smaller sizes…

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