MID JANUARY BIRDS

The Carolina Wren is typically the earliest arriving “spring” bird. I almost never saw them, but I would hear their songs — louder than any bird so small should be able to sing — in early March. This year, it seems they either never left or came back months ahead of schedule. Changing climate? It isn’t nearly as cold as it should and still might be. Also, now they are eating at the feeder which might be because I have increased the amount of suet I put outside.

Otherwise, it’s the usual birds who live here year round. I got some very unsatisfactory pictures of chickadees and tufted titmouses, but some nice ones of one of our backyard blue jays and one of our many nesting cardinals. And of course, our resident pair of Hairy Woodpeckers.

We have at least half a dozen male cardinals often feeding at the same time. This is unusual. Male cardinals are highly territorial and will usually fight with any other males that seem to be encroaching on their territory. Maybe they have made “peace” at the feeder, but I think it’s possible they are all members of one big cardinal family. Cardinals breed here as do all three types of woodpeckers, titmouses, chickadees, and goldfinches. I think the house finches have also decided to nest nearby. The ready availability of food makes their lives much easier.

I’ve come to think of these birds who live, eat, and breed within yards of our back deck as my wild family. They aren’t pets, but they aren’t strangers, either.



Categories: #Birds, #gallery, #Photography, Cardinal, Woodpeckers

Tags: , , ,

2 replies

  1. Beautiful family you have visiting! They are so brilliantly plumed!

    Like

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