JEWELS FROM THE SOUTHWEST – Marilyn Armstrong

RDP Monday: JEWEL


I fell in love with Native American jewelry in a tiny store in Boston’s Italian North End. I didn’t even know it was Native American, but I loved it, that first pair of earrings. Many more were to follow. Necklaces and bracelets and rings and things featuring beautiful pieces of turquoise stone.

Eventually, I realized what I was buying and learned more about it. I’ve never loved any other jewelry the way I loved Navajo and Pueblo and Hopi work from our southwest and on my two visits to Arizona, I always got something special while I was there.

I also discovered online sources until I collected quite a treasure-trove of it. Now I’m at the point of beginning to let go of it because I don’t work. We don’t go to fancy parties, either.

Meanwhile, my wrists have gotten allergic (this is a real thing, no kidding) to anything tight against my wrists. It’s called “wristwatch” allergy and it comes from wearing bracelets and watches for a lifetime. Apparently, your wrists get sensitive. Bizarre, right? Thus with few exceptions, I’ve rehomed my beautiful bracelets with the incredible stones in them because they were just sitting in the drawers of my big jewelry dresser. But I’m glad they will get worn.

Big sky in Navajo land

I also discovered fetishes, mostly carved from antler, but some carved in turquoise. It’s not exactly jewelry, but it’s not exactly not jewelry if you get my drift.

For me, it has always been much more about the stones than the silverwork. A beautiful piece of turquoise doesn’t need a lot of fancy silver around it. It speaks for itself.

So when you see my pictures, all the jewelry I’m wearing — these days, usually just rings and earrings — it’s all from the southwest and most of it is silver and turquoise. But there are also various carved shells and other stones too.

Modern pieces, older pieces, I love all of it. I may not get to wear it often, but I love just having it. And every once in a while, I get to wear it, too.

 

CLOSE TO HOME

Day Trip, by Rich Paschall


While most people would like to go away for vacation, it is not always possible to pack up and catch a flight to England or Ireland, Germany or France, Mexico or Colombia.  In fact, it may not even be possible to take a trip for a few days to another domestic locale by train, bus or automobile.  If your time off of work is mostly given up to obligations around town, you may wish to consider a day trip.  This could be one overnight, or just somewhere close enough to visit during the day, and return home by nightfall.

A lot of stairs to the top

When my “old friend” and occasional travel companion came to visit for a week, we each had a list of things to do together, and some with others.  He had dates and I had social and medical obligations to attend.  When he arrived we went for deep dish pizza, of course.  We found a few hours here and there for socializing together.  We went to a baseball game, his first trip to the south side park.  And we went off on a “day trip.”

About two hours southwest of Chicago, along the Illinois River, is Starved Rock State Park.  The canyons and sandstone bluffs mark an area that is not typical of the state. Outside the Chicago area, Illinois is known more for corn and soybean fields than anything else.  When I took a trip through Illinois to St. Louis with another friend, he remarked that there was nothing remarkable about Illinois.  In fact, it was the flattest land he had ever seen.  Obviously, we had not gone to Starved Rock.

Interstate highways will take you most of the way, before narrow scenic roads take you the rest of your journey.  After stopping at the visitor’s center for refreshment, we headed out to find the trail map to decide on our route.  Since one of the sites my companion wished to see was a long walk and we were right at the Starved Rock, we decided to go for the long climb to the top.

Prior to human habitation, the floods of melting glaciers had carved out these canyons and created the beauty that stands today.  By the late 1600’s the French had established a fort atop the large sandstone “Rock” that overlooks the river.  Eventually they left.

Legend has it that in 1769 the Illiniwek Indians or Illini, pursued by two other ethnic groups, took refuge atop this same sandstone butte.  They were under siege by the tribes below and eventually starved to death, hence the name Starved Rock.  The University of Illinois teams are known as the Fighting Illini, although it seems the actual Illini chose not to fight.  The school mascot is Chief Illiniwek, but that is clearly another story for another time.

Path to the top

As we made our long climb to the top of the rock, we found an elderly couple seated on a bench a short way up the path.  They doubted they would make it all the way.  Much of the area was built over with a steep wooden stairway.  This is not the sort of climb I would normally do either, but my friend was content to move at my pace, so I persisted.

The view at the top was worth the climb.  High above the Illinois river, you can see up and down the waterway, a major tributary of the Mississippi.  You can also see that there is no retreat.  If the rock is surrounded, there is nowhere to go.  You are too far from the river and too high up to even consider jumping.

Illinois River lock and dam

The Illinois River lock and Dam at Starved Rock is one on eight along the massive Illinois river and is located 231 miles from the Mississippi River.  The Illinois River provides a path from the Great Lakes at Lake Michigan to the Mississippi and down to the Gulf of Mexico.  For city kids from the nation’s third largest city, it is an amazing view.  It is also a historically important site to the State of Illinois where archaeological digs have taught us much about local history.  The view, the canyons, the waterfalls, the hiking trails, the campgrounds, the large state park for picnics and fun have made Starved Rock one of the most popular tourist attractions in the state.

Plum Island

From the top of the rock, you can find a view of Plum Island.  It is reported that in 1997 the bald eagle, symbol of America, began to return to this area after near extinction in this region.  The increase in the eagle population is believed to be a direct result of the banning of DDT, an argument for the EPA (yet another story for another time).  In the years that followed there was a battle over development of the land, but the Illinois Audubon Society purchased it in 2004. Today it is a sanctuary that is closed to the public but in full view of the Rock.  Plum Island is a winter home for the majestic eagle who come to fish the river.  This makes the top of Starved Rock a year round attraction.  It may be a difficult or impossible climb in foul (or fowl) weather, however.

Top of the rock

At just two hours away, and with two drivers in the car, we were able to head out in daylight and return in daylight with no problem (late June).  The small and somewhat historic towns that are near to the Park (Utica, Oglesby. Ottawa) show off quaint, small town America.  In addition, the large Matthiessen State Park is just down the road and was our second stop on this trip.  There we were able to go down into the canyons to view a waterfall, a chief interest of my travel buddy.  If you have to stay home on vacation, you do not have to stay home.

What are you looking at?

Resources: Illinois Waterway, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois_Waterway
Starved Rock State Park, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starved_Rock_State_Park
Illinois Starved Rock State Park, http://www.starvedrockstatepark.org/

IN MINIATURE, BEAUTY

Given “miniature” as a subject … and since, just last week I did a whole series of pictures of tiny carved Native American fetishes, this prompt certainly seems to be begging for more of those pictures. So here they are.

Every piece was hand-carved by an individual. The carvers are all either Navajo, Hopi, or Pueblo … with (I believe) a couple maybe Sioux or Cherokee. I have one carved by a local Wampanaug man who lives on Martha’s Vineyard. He carved it for me and I got to see it emerge from the antler.

72-corn-maidens-fetisih_05

I used to have all the paperwork that told me who had carved which piece, when, and where. I lost all the papers. Not just one … the entire packet. Moreover, having bought these from a lot of different places, often directly from the carvers themselves, I can’t reconstruct the trail.

fetishes ram and bear

I don’t, honestly, care about the provenance, except for wishing I could honor the artists by giving them credit for the work. I just love these beautiful pieces.

Mountain lion, wolf, and a lovely stone horse ... and of course, my favorite dancing bear
Mountain lion, wolf, and a lovely stone horse … and of course, my favorite dancing bear

The Corn Maidens are (mostly) much larger than the animal fetishes, but they vary quite a lot in size.

These are all parts of my modest, but lovely collection of modern carved fetishes. Although some (many) are “old-style,” the oldest of these is no more than 20 years. The materials are wood, alabaster, marble, turquoise, antler, and bone.

Each of these animals and the Corn Maidens have meaning in a ritual or religious context, but none of these have been appropriately blessed. I admire the art, but I would never appropriate someone else’s religion and pretend it was mine.

I have been on the other end of that sometimes. It’s annoying. Sometimes, it’s also pretty funny.

THE DAILY POST | MINIATURE