A STATE OF CHAOS AND CONFUSION – Marilyn Armstrong

This morning, I took the camera and went out to see what I could see. It isn’t nearly as cold today as yesterday, but warm? Not really. Still, I could be outside in just a sweater for the fifteen minutes it took to take a few shots of our so-called garden.

Garry took the fallen Fred Flamingo and stood him upright. He now welcomes all comers to the garden mess!

I have done no gardening at all this year. By now, I usually have it cleaned out, clipped down and about as organized as it ever gets — which isn’t very organized. It has been too cold, snowy, rainy, and windy for any kind of gardening. It has been bad enough to make me want to completely avoid going outside. At all.

Today, the sun is shining. It isn’t raining. Although we don’t have snow on the shoots (no flowers yet, just shoots), it’s a complete chaotic mess of a garden. I’m hoping by next week, not only will I have finally stopped coughing, but the weather will coöperate so I can go and do the few little things I can to make the place “almost” respectable.

In the meantime, everything is growing! Give those shoots a few days of warmer temperatures and sunshine, and we might just have a springtime miracle.


From Nancy Merrill:

Spring in Utah is like living in a state of confusion. Each year, the fruit farmers live in constant dread of late spring snowstorms and hard freezes that could wipe out their entire crop. The day after my tulips opened, we had a crazy snowstorm that blanketed our garden with about an inch of snow. Fortunately, the next day the temperature was in the 50s and the snow melted. At least we don’t have to water the gardens yet.


You can see the daffodil greenery and the many lilies. It’s going to be a bonanza year for day lilies.
This green and yellow climbing plant is not a wildflower and I don’t know its name. Probably put here by a former owner, but has in the past two years, really taken over the picket fence.
A big year for day lilies. I can see it!
More of the green and yellow climbers!

BLACK & WHITE OLD AIRPLANES – Marilyn Armstrong

BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY: TRACES OF THE PAST Y4-04

From Paula:

This is the only Black & White Sunday this month, and I decided that it should be Traces of the Past (the recurrent photo challenge on this blog). Here is one of the most beautiful landmarks of Northumberland – the famous Bamburgh Castle. The day I took this photo it glistened nicely in late, golden sunlight, but for this opportunity I decided to show it in silvery tones i.e. in black and white.


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HANGING LOOSE – CEE’S FREE AND EASY PHOTO CHALLENGE – Marilyn Armstrong

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Free and Easy


Free and easy. Some days, I can’t even remember what that felt like. I’ll have to fix that!

Our backyard lawn swing was the best place to sit and read!
The perfect free and easy spot anywhere – Photo: Garry Armstrong
Just rolling!
Hanging out on horseback

PROLIFIC LIFE WITH WIRES: WORDPRESS WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE – Marilyn Armstrong

Daily Post WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: PROLIFIC

This has not been a prolific April. It’s just plain cold. It’s the 18th today and it is not supposed to be this cold. Wet? Maybe. It rains a lot in the spring in these parts. But we shouldn’t have needed another oil delivery this morning. We got one anyway, and probably for the first time in MANY years, we are actually behind in our payments for oil.

We pay all year round to avoid catastrophic single payments, but this year has not been a normal year.

Below, a few very different looks for “prolific.”

Profusion of mics and prolific wires
Prolific wires!
The canal is most prolifically covered with fallen leaves
Violets and dandelions cover the back yard in early spring. And, should we ever have one, I’m sure they will again.
Wild growth on picket fence
Wild profusion of lilies … last spring …
Goldenrod by Roaring Dam
Prolific woodpile

OLD FRIENDS (LEANING TOGETHER LIKE BOOKENDS)

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Objects or People Older than 50 years


Anyone remember when 50 sounded “old” and 60 was about as close to The End as we could imagine? Life has altered — just a little — since then.

Those of us who don’t die young — we lost a few early on — tend to live longer than our parents did. Many of us are pondering if we really want to live to 100. If you aren’t sure, there are some 90+ actors, singers, and dancers to give you hope!

Han Pot – made around 206 BC–220 AD – That’s pretty old! These were the first mass-produced kitchen pottery.
Fenway Park – Built 1912 on the same day on which the Titanic sank. Probably explains the “real” curse.
Old Number Two, dating back to the 1950s and currently undergoing restoration.
Prow on The Beaver, a cargo ship dating to the 1700s.
Steeple of the abandoned Unitarian Universalist church in Uxbridge. Built in the 1880s, I think. Might be earlier, but I’m not sure.

I have a lot of old friends. I’m not including them. No need to thank  me. I am, after all, one of you, too.

AWAKENING – A LITTLE EARLY FOR 2018

WordPress Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge – AWAKENING

Good morning little red finch!

I woke up this morning and started to cough. The deep, hacking cough that screams “bronchial tubes” and “pneumonia.” But it didn’t seem as bad as yesterday, which might mean that this is going to be just a regular cold and not something more serious.

On the other hand, a few days ago, we got this on the way to Connecticut …

It’s a little early in our year — this particular year — for the awakening of fresh young growing things. Unless you count the ants and the mice, both of which were doing simply grandly in our backyard and walls. We have called the killers of things we don’t want living in our house and this morning was the first time I saw any ants. He warned me it takes about two weeks to get them all, so I grabbed them up and disposed of them.

Almost a whiteout on the road

There were only three.

I disdained to check the condition of the basement. The death of small rodents in not a happy occasion for me. I do not hate mice and I am not afraid of them, but they make a horrible mess of the house. They live in the walls and after a while, your whole house smells of mouse turds. A few mice, trying to get in from the ice of winter I can live with, but an entire house full of families and generations of mice? I don’t think so.

I got to thinking about the “generations of mice.”

If you were a mouse, being smarter than “other mice” decided to buy a DNA package to find out to whom in your deep, dark past you might be related? The number of generations is exponential, my dear Watson. Mice dating back to the very first sort-of mammals scurrying around the feet of the giant lizards who ruled the earth.

I don’t think our databases could handle the volume — and unless they all had unique names, how would you know? An entirely different, yet somehow mind-blowing thought.

On the other hand, we got this driving (the same roads) home a few days later …

What would the name of your great-great-great-great-great-great-grandmother’s mouse name be and how could you identify her among the furry-faced zillions of other mice? It is a mind-boggling concept, so I’ll move on.

And this as our sunset just in front of our house.

To say that spring in New England and all points north is unstable is an understatement … and the climate changes our government is ignoring is definitely a part of the problem. To be fair, the weather in this part of this continent is generally unpredictable. Around here, it’s more about the level of unpredictability and this year has been crazy.

Instead of flowers, we have gotten snow and wind and rain and very cold temperatures. We had a few days when the crocus came up — and here they are:

Otherwise, we do have green shoots for the hopefully soon-to-bloom daffodils. Please view last year’s groups and try to relate:

2017 Daffodils by the tractor’s old wheel
2015 Daffodils in the same location. They ARE perennials you know.

This really is spring in New England. We get lots of winter and then we get “it’s not exactly winter, but it sure isn’t spring, either.” One morning, the sun comes up. Sometime between breakfast and lunch, the leaves on the trees open and by mid-afternoon, it’s hot, humid and buggy — which is what we humorously call summer.

Welcome black flies and flying jaws. Welcome mosquitoes who can bite you through your denim jacket. It’s time to itch, wheeze … and if you can, get yourself to one of our wonderful beaches. I wish our seasons were a bit more orderly and perhaps — predictable.

APRIL’S PICK A WORD IN PICTURES

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: PICK A WORD IN APRIL – Y3

From Paula:

It’s time for another Pick a Word theme. As usual you have a choice of five words for this photo challenge, and you can pick any of them, some of them or all. I hope you will inspiration in this post.

Here are the words: dawning, condensed, coalescing, verdant, sempiternal.


Dawning
Little dolls tightly packed (condensed) in a case
When many snow flakes come together, is that a coalescing?
The pond – deeply verdant!
Sempiternal, like Roaring dam

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