SWIFTLY FLOW THE DAYS – RICH PASCHALL

Sunrise, Sunset by Rich Paschall

If you have stopped by SERENDIPITY even just occasionally, you will have noticed a wealth of sunrise and sunset pictures. Marilyn and Garry Armstrong have captured countless images for us and often share some spectacular photo displays. I have even swiped a few over the years to illustrate certain stories and articles. I am about to do it again.

Ogunquit, Maine

You see? When no one was looking, I snuck into the library, borrowed some pictures, and did not tell the librarian. There are so many and I only wanted a few. Do you think they will notice? Perhaps. They have spotted my thievery before. But why should I upload new ones when theirs are so much better?

Rockport, Massachusetts at sunrise

One thing is clear to me after so many years of gazing at the sky. I never get tired of the sunrise and the sunset. No two are alike and many are just spectacular creations of light and color.

Sunrise over the hills, Peacham, Vermont

Sunrise, sunset
Swiftly flow the days
Seedlings turn overnight to sunflowers
Blossoming even as we gaze.

When you get older, you will realize one day that the number of sunrises left for you to see are fewer than the ones you’ve already seen. You understand that missing so many was unfortunate. You should take whatever chances you have to see more of them. In the universe, there may be an endless number, but in our own lives, the number is finite, but unknown.

Sunset in Douglas

Since I am not really a morning person, I am more likely to catch the sunset than the sunrise. I never got tired of walking out of the cargo building at O’Hare to see the sunset over the field. Sometimes a plane would oblige me and take off into the sun. Now we do not go there so I am glad I caught so many last year. I should make a plan to catch more from the nearby park.

Sunset at Block Island

Sunrise, sunset
Swiftly fly the years
One season following another
Laden with happiness and tears

When Marilyn recently posted a gallery of sunset pictures taken by Garry and herself, I thought of a touching scene from Fiddler on the Roof. Late in the first act, Tevye and Golde reflect on the swiftly passing years as they observe the wedding of their oldest child. If you don’t know the song from the award-winning musical, we are happy to share it before another sunset goes by.

See also: “Evening’s Golden Hour,” By Marilyn Armstrong, SERENDIPITY, August 30, 2020.

 

EVENING’S GOLDEN HOUR

Fandango’s Dog Days of August #29

Coming home from Mass General, we drove into the most golden sunset I’ve ever seen. My favorite hours of the day are dawn, just before sunrise when all the birds are singing and you can see the first rays of sun coming over the horizon … and then again twilight and sunset, as the sun sinks down, often leaving some amazing colors behind.

Today, while we were driving home, the sky turned gold. It was something else. The tops of all the winter trees changed color from green to gold. It was remarkable and I don’t think I’ve ever seen that before. It’s difficult taking pictures in the car. Windshield and all that, not to mention the annoying habit the dashboard has of popping up. Garry finally pulled off the road, grabbed his camera and took a few more.

#FDDA – Dog Days of August

IF WISHES WERE HORSES, WE COULD RIDE TOGETHER – Marilyn Armstrong

“If wishes were horses, then beggars would ride … ” – Old Proverb

I do not know what a wish looks like, though I think it might look like a rising sun over a glassy harbor. Beggar that I am, I wish for a horse to ride and one more. Gentle, well-schooled mounts so Garry and I can ride together again. And, I wish all of us the best life can give us — many sunrises on the shores of bright summer days.

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Rockport Harbor at dawn

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ROCKPORT HARBOR AND ANOTHER SUNRISE – Marilyn Armstrong

Fishing Boats and a Scarlet Sunrise


Dawn in Rockport. If pictures look familiar, Rockport, Massachusetts is one of the most photographed locations in the U.S. Not only is it highly photogenic, but it is also an artist’s colony.

Just before daybreak
First light

It was July 4th and I set the alarm for 4 am. It was still fully dark, but luckily, the place we were staying was across the street from the harbor. No hiking was involved, Having done this before, I had my clothing, camera, and anything else I thought I might need already set out.  I dressed in just a few minutes and got moving. By now, I knew I needed long sleeves, pants, and socks. July in Massachusetts is overwhelmed by mosquitoes. The only thing that makes it bearable is a breeze of at least six or seven miles per hour.

No breeze. Not even a hint. I knew I was going to be breakfast for a lot of skeeters.

Perfect sunrise
Almost day
Homes along the shore in the reflection of the rising sun

I was not the only one awake. The fishermen were rigging their boats. They would be gone by the time “normal” people opened their eyes. They seemed immune to the biting menaces — or maybe they were counting on moving out to the Atlantic quickly and leaving the mosquitoes behind.

OGUNQUIT BEACH WITH BIRDS AND A SUNRISE – Marilyn Armstrong

Sunrise Flight


Dawn on Ogunquit beach. It was about 4:30 in the morning when I dragged my body from the bed, threw some clothing on including long sleeves, long pants, and socks. Not because it was so cold. It was a warm September, but I had already discovered that the mosquitoes are voracious in those early hours.

One gull flying over the shore on the hunt for clams and crabs
Looking for breakfast at sunrise

At first, the beach was completely empty, but gradually as it got closer to daylight, there were runners and strollers. Couples hand-in-hand … but apparently only one photographer. Everyone else stayed close to the incoming tide and many walked in the water.

Plovers and a lone gull

I was looking for a wider view, so I stayed back. The farther you are from the water, the worse the mosquitoes become. I think I may have been the only “live one” on the scene.

 

SQUARE AUTUMN DAWN OVER THE TEEPEE #2 – Marilyn Armstrong

Second square, the last light of Autumn sunset

And so another year has begun. Another decade. The last one was insane. I wonder how bad or great the next ten years will be. I’m torn between a faint hope that things have to get better and a sickening fear that it will never get better. Ever again. That the days we remember are gone and won’t come back.

But until I see it getting worse, I’m going to pretend that it’s about to improve. Because I need hope. Don’t we all?

From the rear of the teepee, the day is ending in mid-Autumn.

SQUARE DAWN’S FIRST EARLY LIGHT #1 – Marilyn Armstrong

First square, the first light of dawn

It’s a square New Year, my friends. Even though these pictures look more or less identical to ones I took before Christmas, this is a new dawn. A different sunrise with fresh early light. The problem is that pictures taken from my deck tend to look the same, depending on the time of year.

In the summer is all leaves and you really can’t see much beyond the fence rail and the bird feeders. In the winter, after the leaves have fallen, you see the same trees against the lighter sky. It doesn’t matter whether I take the picture from the kitchen, dining room, or bedroom. Same woods. Same trees. And remarkably, an almost identical sky. These seem to be our local dawn color combo.

First light of day, first frame on the chip

One day I’ll get something different, but so far, unless it’s raining, cloudy, or snowing, this is pretty much it. No matter how hard I try, I can’t come up with something unique. Same old sky. Same colors. Same trees. But isn’t it lovely?

COMING AND GOING OF THE SUN — Marilyn Armstrong

Early morning – Vermont

Other than from the direction, you can’t tell if the sun is coming up or setting. I’ve done all the checking I can and in fact, the light is the same. It depends on the season of the year, but the coloring is identical otherwise.

Seagulls in Rockport
Sunset at home

And yet we are fascinated by the coming and going of the sun. Even when I was a child, I used to stand outside and watch the sky, sometimes for a full hour from late afternoon until final darkness, watching the delicate changes in the sky and the clouds and the way the light filtered through the trees.

I have not yet lost my wonder.

Sunset at the Marina
The rising sun in the mountains in October
A gull at sunrise
Sunset in Douglas
Sunset through clouds

JULY BLUES AND SUNRISE ON THE VERNAL EQUINOX – Marilyn Armstrong

July Blues and the Sky at Dawn – Vernal Equinox 

It was dawn on the day of the Vernal Equinox and I had not closed the shades. I usually do, but I forgot. When I woke up, it looked as if the room was on fire. The blue sky turned deep red and violet before finally, the sun came up. It was the most amazing sunrise I’ve ever seen. My friend called me to ask: “Did you see that sunrise this morning? It was amazing!”

Dawn – Vernal Equinox

And I keep a camera in the bedroom, just for this kind of event. I can only get these amazing sunrises before the leaves come out. After that, the trees hide the sky.

LET THE SUNSHINE IN – Marilyn Armstrong

A Photo a Week Challenge: Sunshine

It was the theme for my son’s fourth-grade graduation ceremony. Funny that I should remember it so clearly. My son is turning 50 in a few weeks and I’ve forgotten a lot, but this I remember. And I remember that I cried.

A DAILY MIRACLE – Marilyn Armstrong

Dawn of a new day, as indeed it must

Every dawn is a little miracle. An expected miracle. We know there will be dawn because there is always dawn and then sunrise, right? So, let’s go with the expected.

The sun will rise and the earth will turn because it always has and that’s the way we like it.

Sunrise over the ocean in Ogunquit, Maine – About five in the morning

Thus we greet the day.

WINTER SOLSTICE – Marilyn Armstrong

RDP Friday: SOLSTICE

Why did it have to be raining? Why was today the day that every bone in my body hurts and some things which are arguably not bones, hurt too? The birds are outside rain and all.

They don’t expect a warm, dry house … and there’s a feeder to raid. I suppose, when you are a bird, a decent meal is about as good as it gets.

I know this means the season is turning again and days will get longer and ultimately, it will warm up. But not for a while. We have three long winter months to navigate and we’ve barely begun yet.

And meanwhile, at Stonehenge …

The bears have not gone into hibernation. Not cold enough yet? Too many trash cans to raid?

The sky is a leaden pale gray as the heavy rain falls. The dogs want nothing to do with outside. Snow is fun and everything else is okay too, but rain? No, thank you. Pass the biscuits. The sofa is home for now.

Winter Solstice – Sunrise – 2016

I have a doctor appointment. My right arm has taken to hurting a lot and won’t let me sleep. Nothing makes it any better. I think it may actually be a sign that my chest is beginning to heal, but why does it have to hurt so much?

It could be snowing. That would probably be worse, or at least, more complicated. We still have no one to plow the driveway and it’s a long, long road to the “real” road.

Winter has finally come, I suppose. I should be happier about it. I’m trying hard to find that happy place.