IN JAPANESE, THERE’S A WORD FOR IT

When talking about photography, English doesn’t always make the grade. As it turns out, Japanese does.

The Japanese have a word for everything, I think. I just learned “Komorebi. It means “sunlight filtering through the leaves of trees,” and by extension, the natural filtering of light through anything. Like blinds or curtains, for example. 75-051214-Komorebi-Sunlight_12I’ve been chasing that light for more than 40 years. It’s just the word I’ve needed. I’ve been trying to capture that light as long as I can remember.

Komorebi.

Remember it. It’s a great word.A golden tree and the rays of sunlight Then there is bokeh, a word so popular it is now included in American books about photography.

Bokeh defines something difficult to say in English.

“Bokeh means the aesthetic quality of the blur (soft and out of focus) area in an image produced by a lens.”

Like this?Dry weeds by the river

Or that? KaityI’m sure there’s more, but this is my vocabulary lesson for the day.

KOMOREBI AND BOKEH: JAPANESE – THE PHOTOGRAPHY LANGUAGE

When talking about photography, English doesn’t cut it. As it turns out, Japanese does.

72-autumn-twilight-23102016_20

The Japanese have a word for everything, it seems. I just learned “komorebi.” It means “sunlight filtering through the leaves of trees,” and by extension, the natural filtering of light through anything. Like glass or curtains, for example.

75-051214-Komorebi-Sunlight_12

It’s just the word I’ve needed. I’ve been chasing that light for more than 40 years.

Bokeh is my previously learned favorite Japanese photographic term. It defines something difficult to say in English: “Bokeh means the aesthetic quality of blur in the out-of-focus areas of an image produced by a lens.”

bouquet with bokeh 10

Like this?

 

72-romantic-flowers-10162016_01Or that?

Kaity

I’m sure there’s more, but this is my vocabulary lesson for the day.

BOUQUET WITH BOKEH

Much to my surprise and delight, Garry brought me flowers yesterday. The previous bouquet of sunflowers needed to move on to wherever dead flowers go. I tend to not bury the dead ones until I can replace them with live ones. For reasons I just can’t explain, I always feel bad about dead flowers.

bouquet with bokeh 3

Even though I know they would die anyway, even if no one cut them and put them in a vase. Even if they lived their entire lives in the most natural of setting, they would go from bud to dead blossom because, hey, death is just the ass end of life.

bouquet with bokey 14

I like photographing the bouquets. I can’t shoot them in the house anymore because the light is blocked by the new air conditioner, so I carried the vase and bouquet to the deck. Perfect weather, perfect light. Bright, but a little hazy. It doesn’t get better than that.

bouquet with bokeh 10

Just for a change, I used my Olympus portrait lens and was, in viewing the results, reminded of how very much I love this lens. Honestly, I’m not sure you can take a bad picture with it. It has the loveliest bokeh (that fuzzy background) and a wonderfully shallow depth of field. It’s intended for taking portraits of people, but it turns pretty much everything you shoot into art.

THERE’S A WORD FOR IT IN JAPANESE

When talking about photography, English doesn’t cut it. As it turns out, Japanese does.

The Japanese have a word for everything, I think. I just learned “Komorebi. It means sunlight filtering through the leaves of trees,” and by extension, the natural filtering of light through anything.

75-051214-Komorebi-Sunlight_12

It’s just the word I’ve needed. I’ve been chasing that light for more than 40 years.

A golden tree and the rays of sunlight

Bokeh is my previously learned favorite Japanese photographic term. It defines something difficult to say in English: “Bokeh means the aesthetic quality of blur in the out-of-focus areas of an image produced by a lens.”

Like this?

Dry weeds by the river

Or that?

Kaity

I’m sure there’s more, but this is my vocabulary lesson for the day.

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: FLORAL LAYERS

75-YellowLayers-99

Flowers. In a garden on Main Street. The middle of town towards the end of July. Bright yellow and the village forms the background layer behind the lilies.

75-YellowNK-103

Usually, I shoot flowers, intentionally dropping the background into bokeh. Or just shoot tight enough to make everything other than the flowers disappear. This time, I wanted the context, the layering.

75-YellowLayers-102

Weekly Photo Challenge: Focus – Sweet Bokeh

Kaity

Weekly Photo Challenge: Focus or Lack Thereof