THE WILDFLOWER GARDEN AT RIVER BEND – Garry Armstrong

Wildflower Garden at River Bend – 08/05/19

River Bend is all about “wild.” So, not surprisingly, the gardens are entirely made up of wildflowers. I took a few pictures of them. The gardens are peaceful and the bees are always busy within.

The wildflower garden at River Bend

TALL BLUE WATER LILIES BY THE BLACKSTONE – Marilyn Armstrong

The park was empty, but water lilies were healthy!

Blue waterlilies
More waterlilies
And even more
More!

 

AS THE DAYLILIES BEGIN TO FADE AWAY – Marilyn Armstrong

The passing of the Daylilies – FOTD – 07/22/2019

The Daylilies are reaching the end of their road. Some are still blooming, but most are just stalks and won’t return until next summer.

We still have some roses and the odd Rhododendron, but that’s pretty much “it” for our garden this year.

A pair of daylilies

DAY LILIES AND BUDS: SUMMERTIME IN YE OLDE NEW ENGLANDE – Marilyn Armstrong

FOTD – July 3, 2019 – Daylily and buds

How did the daylily become our best classic summer flower. It grows everywhere.

You can see it by the sides of the road, in our gardens, in vacant lots and even in the woods.

You can see fancy Chinese ones sometimes, but the classic deep orange daylily rules New England in the heart of our summer.

We always have a lot of daylilies, but this year, I think we have EVEN more than usual … which is a lot of daylilies. Probably all the rain. This will be the first week we have gone more than two days without rain! The first time since … last August maybe?

Daylilies with blossoms, buds, and one big rusty tractor
More bud and daylilies — and part of the tractor
More buds, fewer daylilies

DAYLILIES START BLOOMING – Marilyn Armstrong

DAYLILIES – FOTD – July 1, 2019

I was hoping to get outside and see more lilies today, but instead, we had intermittent storms. Thunder, lightning, hail, rain, sun, gloomy clouds … and each of them more than once. The weather kept rolling around. It certainly was entertaining, but not inviting.

It also was stormy last night, but the thunder today was more impressive this afternoon. Garry heard it when NOT wearing hearing aids.

YOU CAN’T KILL HOSTA – Marilyn Armstrong

 Hosta, The Unkillable – FOTD – 06/09/19

Last year, it almost died. I don’t know what did it. The winter? The long, cold, icy spring? Some combination of that? But it barely grew at all.

I was shocked. As far as I know, you cannot kill Hosta. It is permanent. Endurable. Grows in sun, grows in shade, grows anywhere you put it. Gets so big, you have to separate it to give it room to breathe.

So this year, when it magically reappeared — big leaves in all its many shapes and colors — I was relieved. Maybe last year it was dividing itself from being too crowded in its bed.

Hosta
Another leaf Hosta
Hosta with Mayflowers
With Mayflowers and a weed of unknown origin
Hosta and a few Mayflowers

COLUMBINE – IT CAME BACK! – Marilyn Armstrong

Columbine – FOTD – June 2, 2019

I thought the Columbine had bloomed and died in a week. I was wrong. Apparently, that was merely the leading edge of a whole lot more Columbine.

One of the odd outcomes of the recent windy weather we’ve had because, as we all know, climate change is propaganda created by the Chinese, is that flowers are showing up in places they were never planted. Half of our garden is now on the other side of the driveway. Not roses or other things that have shoots but flowers with seeds which could be blown a distance.

That’s how we found Narcissus over there — which is still puzzling since no narcissus has grown in the regular garden in years, so those seeds were either dropped by a bird or blown from who knows where. Now there’s a lot of Columbine there, too. There has been so much wind and so often, I have no idea what’s going to show up next.

Meanwhile, there’s Columbine all over the garden, at least twice as much as I’ve seen there before.