ONE GOLDEN DAY AMIDST A SEA OF MUD AND WIND – Marilyn Armstrong

Golden November Day – FOTD – November 5, 2018


Bronze oak leaves piled against the back door

So just when you think autumn is over for good and all, when every maple leaf has blown to the earth and half the trees along the road are broken, the sun comes out and the oak trees are burnished gold.

Through the trees
Sunshine and oak trees

It’s the only sunny day we’re going to get this week. It’ll be stormy and windy and raining tomorrow and the day after. I think we may get half a day of not-rain sometimes in the middle of the week, but after that, it’s going to get cold, with more rain.

So I picked up my camera, went outside to the deck and took some pictures.

The light through the trees is amazing
Sunshine!

Just a day of sunshine made me feel better. And I’m not dealing well with the time change. I can’t believe it’s not even 10 pm. It has been dark since a little past four. It’s going to be mostly dark for the next four months. I wonder if any of my winter coats still fit?

 

AUTUMN ALONG THE CANAL – Marilyn Armstrong

FOTD – as NIGHTS GROW COLD


Path along the canal and the footbridge to River Bend

Summer never wanted to end, or so it seemed. As we entered October and all the trees were still green, I gave up hoping for a sudden turnaround. Instead of a cold snap, it seemed to steam up. Then we got one cold night, more heat, humidity, and rain. And then, it got cold.

We got one and a half sunny days. Knowing how erratic our weather is, we went shooting on both days. Another day we went out, we managed to shoot during just two hours between rainstorms.

Walking along the canal on a sunny day in October

Our first stop was, of course, the Blackstone River. The river is the heart of the valley and almost all the most beautiful parts of the valley are linked to the river.

The little footbridge

This part of The Blackstone Valley Historic Corridor is the place where the canal and the river physically separate. The canal has not been used for more than 150 years, so it has developed a life of its own with spawning trout, nesting geese, and a million water lilies.

Footbridge from River Bend

I know I’ve taken a million pictures of this section of the canal. I can’t help it. I’m always sure there’s one more perfect picture to be taken and I’m going to take it. If not this year, then next year.

Hint of the pear tree
Pears

What’s interesting is that all of these parks are in fact physically linked to the river. Each section of the park is another section of the Blackstone with a place to park, then sit and watch the river flow past.

This particular two-part section, you can see — when the leaves are off the trees — from one part to the other. We used to walk our dogs from one part to the other along the path by the river.

I was a better walker back then. I miss walking.

MAPLES TREES ALONG THE BLACKSTONE RIVER – Marilyn Armstrong

FOTD – October 20, 2018 – Maple Trees

Garry and I went down to the River Bend Farm along the Blackstone River. The trees were still green except for the maple trees, a giant pear tree, and some Virginia Creepers. Also at home, I found some brilliant sassafras leaves which turn an incredible shade of yellow gold.

Red creeper
A really big maple tree
Virginia creeper in yellow – See the red version, too
Yellow leaves in a big pear tree
Fallen leaves
Oak leaves

MAPLES ALONG THE BLACKSTONE – Garry Armstrong

FOTD – October 19, 2018 – Maple Leaves

When we were down by the Blackstone River at River Bend Farm. Except for the maple trees, all the trees were dark green. It made a strange autumn scene.

Photo: Garry Armstrong
Photo: Garry Armstrong
Photo: Garry Armstrong