February ended and we all thought — especially me! — that spring was just around the corner. We’d had a lot of snow in January — with warm weeks in between. We had considerable snow in February — with even warmer weeks in between. This being March, I was waiting for the song of the Carolina sparrow.


It was mainly high wind and rain. We got a dusting of snow, but we also got the kind of heavy, drenching rain I usually associate with tropical storms and hurricanes. The first storm, on March 2, lasted almost three days — longer on some places along the shore.

For this “Changing Seasons,” I am here to show you the rest of the winter. Apparently winter was not wintry enough, so anything remaindered landed in March. We had three major nor’easters in less than two weeks.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

There is another possibly on the way, but none of the local meteorologists have quite figured out whether or not it is going to hit us or wander off into the Atlantic.


This was another heavy wind event with terribly high tides, massive shore erosion … and about 5 inches of snow, inland. The trees were moving in the wind which is more than a little frightening considering the size of these giant oak trees. The less I looked at them, the happier I was.

We didn’t lose power, but we were lucky. Across New England and New York, more than a million people lost power and some still have not yet been connected.

For all the dull months when we took very few pictures, we made up for it big time in March. Tons of snow, rapid melting. More snow. We don’t live on the coast or I could show you 50 foot high waves pounding the sea walls in Scituate (pron: Si-choo-ate) and everywhere along the cape, but especially in Bourne and Barnstable.


The predictions for this one were a little different. A heavy blow of more wind along the shore, but massive quantities of snow for our area. in fact, Worcester won the cup — the most snow in the region.

Just under 28 inches.

Worcester beat out Uxbridge by less than half an inch getting a full 28 inches. We got 27.7 inches. It was a lot of heavy, wet snow. We didn’t get any of the wind and the trees groaned under the weight of the snow hanging in its branches.

Digging out

We both took pictures but even so, no one went very far. It was cold, the snow came down for a long, long time — almost 24 hours in total.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

March is by far the most erratic weather month in this region. March came in like a brace of hungry lions. I’m hoping he leaves us gently, trailing flowers. Right now, that seems unlikely.

All the early flowers were killed off by the brutal snow that followed the warming period. I think we will go from winter to almost summer during April. That isn’t unusual, either. In fact, it is more typical not otherwise.

Gibbs enjoying the snow

February is usually the worst month for blizzards and really heavy snow, but March takes the cup for 2018. Just because the month is more than half over, it’s too early to stow your winter gear.

The better news is there’s a lot of melting going on when the sun is out. It’s still cold, but not like it was earlier in the winter. We aren’t getting prolonged bouts of below zero (Farenheit) temperatures.

And, then, there was getting around after the snow. The towns are all good at cleaning up. We may not be good at a lot of other things, but we know how to clear the roads.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

Rules — not etched in stone:

Do you want to participate in «The Changing Seasons»?
These are the rules for Version 1 (The Changing Seasons V1):

  • Tag your posts with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons
  • Each month, post 5-20 photos in a gallery.
  • Don’t use photos from your archive. Only new shots.

These are the rules for Version 2 (The Changing Seasons V2):

    • Tag your posts with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons
    • Each month, post one photo (recipe, painting, drawing, whatever) that represents your interpretation of the month.
    • Don’t use archive stuff. Only new material!

Hosted this year by: Zimmerbitch – Age is just a number


Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge:  Bikes of Any Kind

The Bike Show

It turned out that every picture we have that shows bicycles is a Garry Armstrong special. I know there are a few more, but Marilyn could only find one. The rest of the bicycle photographs seem to have vanished into the huge collection of photographs.



FROM PAULA: It’s time for another Traces of the Past theme and this month it shall be in colour. Peeking through bleak and bare trees and nature’s monochrome there is a beautiful Neogothic Parish church of Bled. Not one’s typical view of that enchanting Slovenian town, but the one I thought you might enjoy. For once I decided to show you an example from not so distant past as this church was built in the early 20th century. You have a week to post your entries for this photo challenge. In the meantime I wish you a happy Thursday and a great weekend!

The old boardwalk at Coney Island is a favorite place for me. I’ve been going there since I was a child. It has been set on  the coast of Brooklyn on the Atlantic Ocean for close to 150 years — pretty old for an amusement park.

My mother — and Garry’s mother — went there when they were children and again as young adults with friends. It has always been a place to play, whether you are five or 90. And Nathan’s still has the best hot dogs in the world. Yes, I know you can buy them in the grocery store, but the ones they grill on the boardwalk taste different. The ones you eat at Coney Island taste like ocean and salty winds off the sea.

Coney Island boardwalk

And now, a few of the old rides that are still available. Hurricane Sandy, ten years ago (more?) almost killed off the park, but they brought it back with new rides and redid the boardwalk, too.

The various rides have come and gone, but the boardwalk has remained. After nearly disappearing during Hurricane Sandy, has been improved. In fact, the destruction wrought by the hurricane actually forced “the powers that be” to fix the place up. It is much classier now than it was, almost like it was back in the 1930s when it was “the Disneyland” of the north.

These are older pictures, from 9 or 10 years ago.

The Cyclone — Almost 100 years old and still the scariest roller coaster I’ve been on. Not the biggest, but definitely the most terrifying.

jupiter najnajnoviji


I cannot begin to express how tired I am of winter. I was doing okay. Even through the last two nor’easters, I was alright. I figured after two big storms in less than a week and a half, we were done and spring was going to pop right out of the cold earth.

Not exactly.

This was a huge storm. We didn’t get the high winds that they got along the coast and down on the cape, but we got about two feet of snow and it’s pretty heavy. Because we didn’t get the wind, the snow is heavy in the trees and has not fallen off at all.

The trees are all bent over and I wonder how many of them are going to break. They are obviously stressed.


Photo: Garry Armstrong

The dogs — at least The Duke and Bonnie — have been enjoying it. Gibbs is not much of a weather dog. He’s a “lay in the sun all day” kind of dog. He has a spot on a rock in the front of the house and he has been known to just lay there for hours soaking up the sun. So snow and ice … he doesn’t hate it, but he isn’t thrilled about it either.

Gibbs enjoying the snow

Bonnie, though, loves snow. Always has. She was a Halloween puppy and her whole upbringing was during one of our worst winters. I think her earliest memories are bounding around the yard in the snow while mom stands there in her night-gown, boots, overcoat, gloves, and hat begging her to do her thing so mom can go back to bed. Three in the morning in a foot of snow with a howling wind was not the optimum time for puppy training. But it got done and Bonnie was left with a genuine passion for snow.

Digging out

Duke probably never saw snow until he moved here, but he has been having a lot of fun with it, finally. Once he decided that cold feet wasn’t such a big deal after all.

Meanwhile, it looks like another universe out there. I have never seen snow so heavy lying on the trees and not falling off. Usually, the snow falls within an hour after the snow stops, but when darkness fell, it was still up there in the trees.



They began talking about another big storm at the end of last week. I was trying to not listen because I’ve had it with winter. It has been pretty warm … well at least not bitterly cold. We’ve had two nor’easters in less than two weeks, so what were the odds of having another one?

Yesterday, the morning arrived with a brilliant blue sky. We already knew that there was a storm brewing and we hustled to try and get everything done before whatever it was that would hit us.

When we got home from the MVB and the doctor and the post office, the sky wasn’t blue. It was filling up with storm clouds.

Tuning in the weather on TV, we were assured we’re absolutely getting snow. A lot of snow. More than a foot  and possibly twice that. What happened to our tentative grasp on spring? The dawning hope of flowers?

And there’s twice this amount by now …

When I first got up this morning, I opened the insulated curtains and looked outside. About an inch and a half, I figured. Then I turned on the computer and realized … that was just the beginning. There was at least another foot, maybe a foot and a half still to come.

I went back to bed. I saw absolutely no point in getting up. When I finally poked my head out of the covers a couple of hours later, there was a lot more snow on the ground … on everything. I told the dogs to stop being ninnies and go on out, which they did. Complaining, then, suddenly delighted. They kept coming in, covered in snow, having me towel them down, then running right back out. They don’t need spring. This is great, right Ma?

Right kids.

Not spring quite yet.

Will this winter never end? Between the brutality of politics and the cruelty of weather, the news is giving me a headache.

Branches and snow – spring will be delayed until the tracks are cleared. Thank you for your patience.

Nor is there any guarantee this will be the last storm of the season.  It’s March. You just never know what’s coming next.

NOTE: Posts like this take a lot longer than you think. I have to take the pictures, process them, and finally post something. I apologize for being so slow, but all that takes time!


A Photo a Week Challenge: Girl Power

From Nancy Merrill: While it might seem a bit cliché, literally none of us would be here without women. All of our lives have been touched by women: mothers, grandmothers, aunts, cousins, sisters. I was fortunately enough to take family photos for this wonderful group of women (and the men in their lives). What a great legacy.

I wasn’t sure what to post for this. Women have always been my strength, my closest friends, the people who understood me when no one else had a clue. So I finally decided to make a gallery of the great women I have loved. I don’t have enough pictures, though.


Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Leaves or Trees

If we have a lot of anything around here, it’s leaves. Lots of woods mean lots of leaves. Oak and maple, sassafras and catalpa. And there are more, many more. I take a lot of leafy pictures. These are all leaves. If I start adding trees, I could be here all night.