MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE (ON WEDNESDAY)

MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE #71 : LEARN PHOTOGRAPHY


Mundane, yet somehow, artistic. This is my sink. And the stainless steel faucets and spigot. With reflections.

72-kitchen-sun-080916_03

You said mundane, right? And here’s a macro – black and white – of the husk of the Indian corn that hangs over the sink.

72-bw-corn-macros-080416_18

And finally, here’s the entire bunch of corn. For comparison’s sake.

72-indian-corn-kitchen-sun-080916_06

And so goes another week … time is just flying by.

MUNDANE MONDAY ON TUESDAY

MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE #69 : LEARN PHOTOGRAPHY


This is a challenge from PhoTrablogger. He created it to help us all find beauty in the ordinary things in our lives.  The challenge is find beauty in mundane things. Frame them beautifully. Upload the photographs. Send him a pingback by including the URL of his original post in your challenge post.


Robbie at twilight in the summer

Robbie at twilight in the summer

Late light on a summer afternoon

Late light on a summer afternoon

MUNDANE MONDAY ON TUESDAY: SOCKS

Let us, for a brief moment, consider the subject of … socks.

Socks?

Yup. Socks.

I have, throughout my life, suffered from cold feet. Not figuratively. In the fully literal meaning of the words, my feet are always cold. Even when the rest of me is warm enough, my feet are cold. They used to tell me it was poor circulation and, it turned out, they — all of them — were right. It was and is.

I have tried furry slippers, and slipper socks. I have Uggs for the winter. But in the end, what works for me and makes my feet happy … are socks. I don’t wear any old tube socks. No “12 pair for one low price” specials for me.

I like making a footwear statement. These are my favorites.

MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE #66 : LEARN PHOTOGRAPHY – PhoTrablogger

CORN AND SOME MAIDENS – MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE

MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE #63 : LEARN PHOTOGRAPHY

from PhoTrablogger


It’s still a horror show outside and I’m stuck in the house until the world stops tilting at this weird angle. Life has become surreal. Taking out the trash, or opening the door to call the dogs … or collecting the mail, grabbing a package … suddenly all these mundane things are adventures into a world full of alien invaders. However bad it was the last time I wrote about it? It’s much worse now. It’s kind of unbelievably bad. The ground looks like it’s moving. It is literally a carpet of writhing, hairy caterpillars.

In a few weeks, those ugly caterpillars will be equally horrible moths. They won’t eat the trees anymore, but there won’t be anything left to eat by then anyway. The oaks and birch are bare. The maples are disappearing. The pines, stripped of their needles, will die. Conifers don’t recover from defoliation.

No more rhododendrons. I hope the local farmers are able to save some of the orchards. This is prime apple country, usually … but not this year. I doubt we’ll have any corn or tomatoes, either.

In addition to the nightmare quality and defoliation of our woods, this is an economic disaster for farmers.

And now, some corn … and corn maidens. In honor of lost summers, with hopes for summers to come.


72-corn-maidens-fetisih_05

MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE – MOTHS AND ME

This is my photo of the week. Maybe of the month. It is the rapidly growing caterpillar of the Gypsy Moth. They have invaded our oak woods and they are everywhere. Last week they were tiny, but they’re a lot bigger now and will be twice the size in another few weeks.

72-gypsy-caterpillar-060616_015

These voracious eaters can and will munch their way through the hardwood trees in the woods. I swear I can hear them crunching away at night. They eat night and day until they turn into moths. At which point they stop eating and eventually lay eggs and die.

I tried to knock all the caterpillars off  the door so as not to bring a dozen or more gypsy moths crawlies into the house with me. This one refused to be knocked off and clung to the door jamb with all several hundred of his sticky little feet.

72-pink-fuchsia-060616_013

The birds apparently don’t like the way they taste. There are so very many of them! At least they are (mostly) leaving my fuchsia in peace.

MUNDANE MONDAY CHALLENGE #62


I thought I’d add this piece from Ontario’s (Canada) INVADING SPECIES website. Gypsy moths are the number one dangerous invasive species in North America. I am not exaggerating.

Gypsy Moth
Lymantria dispar

Gypsy moth is an insect native to Europe and Asia that has been severely weakening trees across North America. Gypsy moth was introduced to North America in the late 1860’s near Boston and has spread over the past century. Despite the successful use of insect predators, as well as fungal and viral controls, gypsy moth populations do occasionally reach outbreak levels and continue to expand their range.

Gypsy moth caterpillars defoliate host trees, mostly hardwood species, such as: oak, birch, poplar, willow, maple and others. During outbreak years, nearly all broadleaf trees may be completely defoliated, caterpillars appear everywhere, and “frass” (caterpillar droppings) appear to rain from the trees. Adult gypsy moths are only seen in mid-summer when temperatures are above freezing. This species is known to infest trees in woodland or suburban areas.

Range

Gypsy moths can be found throughout southern Canada, across the eastern and central United States, and most of the western states. Populations have been found in southern Ontario, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and British Columbia. Each population varies annually and fluctuates with local conditions.

Impacts of Gypsy Moth

  • Defoliates and kills large amounts of trees, affecting the many benefits provided by trees.
  • Economic impacts affect all forest users.
  • Caterpillars may chew small holes in leaves or completely strip a canopy, depending on age and population levels.