TIME FOR THE SHOW! – Marilyn Armstrong

Time for a Show: Square Day in the Theater District

We’ve eaten the big meal. Opened all our gifts. We are stuffed with goodies and wondering if there’s enough room for cheesecake or even a cookie.

Maybe it’s time to do something different.

How about taking in a show? The theater district waits for us and the lights are shining!

Boston’s Theater District at night

JUNE IS SQUARE: THE FINAL ROOF #30 – Marilyn Armstrong

It’s that time of year again and squares are back!  

I can’t believe it. It’s been a whole month of rooves and roofs. On barns and teepees. On boats and tall buildings. From Boston to a museum by the Blackstone, we’ve been roofing it up all over the place.

And this is the last one! The very last one. I wanted to make it special. Glittery. Different. So I picked the line of tents on “lighting night” at the Heritage Museum on Cape Cod.

Tents at the fair on lighting night at the Heritage Museum


And so the sixth month of the year is finished and we head for the final six months.

That’s right. We are officially closer to the end of the year than the beginning. Wasn’t it spring, early spring, just yesterday? Now it is full summer and the flowers are deep and rich.

See you all in September when squares roll around again!


Well, the theme was ROOFS (or rooves if you prefer). Your roof could have been:

A – Any type, any condition, any size, and in any location.
B – It could be a shot across rooftops, of one roof like today or even a macro
C – You might prefer to spend some time under the eaves and in the attic, or enjoy the view from above as Brian has already done today.


See you in the fall!

THE LIGHTS OF NIGHT – A PHOTO A WEEK CHALLENGE – Marilyn Armstrong

A Photo a Week Challenge: Light the Night

I love shooting at night. I don’t do it as often as I used to, probably because we don’t get out at night nearly as much as we used to. I still have a few pictures saved. Being on vacation, there are a lot of pictures I can’t access because they are on the other computer or external drives.

However, I think these will do.

The theater district, before the show

Downtown, night

Uxbridge, winter, night

Gibbous moon at night

THE CHANGING SEASONS – EARLY WINTER – DECEMBER 2016

THE CHANGING SEASONS: DECEMBER 2016

Evangelical church on the common after dark in December

Evangelical church on the common after dark in December

You never know about December. We’ve had some of our most memorable blizzards this month. I remember one storm, when we still lived in Boston. It hit in early December and dropped 22 inches on the city. Other years, different winters, we have had no measurable snow until late January or February. And, just to confuse the issue, every four or five years, we have a winter with no snow or nearly none. It all depends on the prevailing winds, the polar vortex, and the positioning of Santa’s sleigh in the arctic. Most important is whether or not we are ready for winter to arrive. If we aren’t, an early hard winter is guaranteed.

Our house. After I took this, I realized that we have lived here for almost 17 years and this is the first time I've shot a night photograph of our house.

After I shot this, I realized we’ve lived here almost 17 years — yet this is the first time I’ve photographed our house after dark

I have discovered a direct correlation between how much money you spend on snow removal equipment and how much snow will fall that season. If you spend big money and get a powerful snowblower or tractor that will easily tackle four-foot drifts on the bunny slope we optimistically call “our driveway,” your odds of getting no snow deeper than three inches increases exponentially.

If you spend more than $1500, you may get two back-to-back winters without any appreciable snow. You can bribe weather gods. I have no idea what they do with the money. Do they hang out on the sunny beaches of Jamaica or Waikiki? If I were a winter weather god, those would be my top two choices.

The rectory of the Evangelical church on Uxbridge common

The rectory of the Evangelical church on Uxbridge common

On the other hand, if you love winter sports, you can trick the gods and assure proper snow depths by not buying any snow-clearing equipment. All you need to do is go into the winter snow season completely unprepared. Extra points for failing to switch to snow tires. This will certainly guarantee a blizzard of (almost) epic proportions.

Is this real? True? I’m sure you can find it on Facebook. You can always find the Truth on social media.

Uxbridge Common at night ... just before Christmas with lights.

Uxbridge Common at night … just before Christmas with lights

Last year’s winter was very mild and so far, this season, we’ve had only one dusting plus a modest little snow that melted the following day. No great heaps of snow. It has been very cold and other places not far from here have gotten considerably more winter weather than us. I believe this is because last year, we finally gave in and bought a four-wheel-drive Jeep. For the amount of money it cost, we may get as many as three mild winters.

Snow in the woods in December

Snow in the woods in December

I was trying to find a single picture that screamed “December.” But this month, I bought (second-hand, but in perfect condition) a terrific Leica f1.4 lens for my Olympus OM-D. It’s the lens for night photography.

Last summer's chrysanthemums linger as the season's first snow falls

Last summer’s chrysanthemums linger as the season’s first snow falls

I also got the Topaz Simplify 4 filter set. This has skewed my photographic endeavors in the direction of artistic and experimental rather than my more typical realism. I hope you like the results. I’m having so much fun with combinations of filters, I felt compelled to show off at least of few of them to you. What I like best about this kind of photography is that it is like painting. It’s not just things as they are or were, but as I see them in my mind’s eye.

Bonnie watches the snow falling.

Bonnie watches snow falling

Finally, I could not choose only one photograph. Here is 2016 through all the changing seasons.

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See you all on the flip side of the calendar. Cardinal Guzman has kindly offered to host this challenge again in 2017, so I will look forward to viewing all your beautiful pictures next year.

Enjoy the holiday and the season!

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A HARVEST MOON

It was the full harvest moon last night with a partial lunar eclipse in some latitudes. We have no unobstructed view of the sky from anywhere on this property, but I still felt it was worth the effort to see if I could get a few interesting pictures.

The pictures were taken over the course of a few hours. You probably can’t see the difference, but the moon is at a different angle in the later pictures than the earlier ones. Even with the trees, it’s still lovely.

MOON OVER

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Every photographer has to take a few pictures of the moon. I’m no exception. Of course, because the moon does not rotate on her axis and shows us only one face, most moon shots look much the same.

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Those few times when I have been able to shoot the through trees in the woods, I got something a little different.

MOON | THE DAILY POST

WHAT LURKS IN THE DARK?

Humans, throughout history, have feared the dark. Our eyes are not well-adapted to seeing in low light levels and we fear what we cannot see. Our hearing is not as acute as our feline and canine companions. Nor can our sense of smell inform us what may be stalking us in the night.

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Almost all of our literature that contains night images is — at least — a bit scary.

Yet, in the normal course of things, most of what is “out there” in the dark is pretty much the same stuff that is there by day. It’s not scarier or more dangerous. We just aren’t sure what it is.

dark cemetary

It would seem that the uncertainly — for humans — is the same as frightening. Would anyone like to take a shot at why this is so? Does it go back to caves and lurking saber-toothed tigers? Or is in buried deep in our DNA.

DARKNESS | THE DAILY POST

OPENINGS: DOORS AND WINDOWS

cee's fun foto chall

From Cee:

This week’s topic is Doors and Windows. Some doors have windows in them such as house doors, commercial building doors, garage doors, vehicle doors, bulldozers and trains these are some of what I am looking for. You can all have a solid door with a window being prominent in your photo as well. Both items need to be represented somehow. Be creative.

Doors and windows from Boston, Upton, Uxbridge, Amherst, Williamsburg, and Baltimore.

 

ODDBALL NIGHTS IN BOSTON

CEE’S ODD BALL PHOTO CHALLENGE: 2015 WEEK #50

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Imagine. Week 50! Two weeks to the end of the year. Where did the other weeks go? They just blew through here, leaving dust and dog hair in their wake.

What is an Oddball?

Noun –
1. A person or thing that is atypical, bizarre, eccentric, or nonconforming, especially one having beliefs that are unusual but harmless.
Adjective –
2. Whimsically free-spirited; eccentric; atypical: an oddball scheme.

Taking pictures on the streets of Boston is entirely different than shooting in Uxbridge.

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I had fun with these … seeking a certain “mood” … hoping for a cinematic sensibility. All taken in downtown Boston in and around Symphony Hall.

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A bit film noir?

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