AUGUST: DOG AND OTHER DAYS – Marilyn Armstrong

August 2012 through 2019

A little photographic journey around the northeastern end of the American continent.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

Rockport, Massachusetts at sunrise

I didn’t have a single fire pump for Cee’s challenge, so I went back through seven years of August. From Glocester to Rockport, from Connecticut to Maine … these are the hot, humid, hazy days of late summer in New England.

TWO BY TWO – SUNRISE-SUNSET

Photo Challenge – Rise and Set

For this week’s photo challenge, explore the vibrant, hopeful colors of your favorite sunrise or sunset.

Other than from the direction, you can’t tell if the sun is coming up or setting. I’ve done all the checking I can and in fact, the light is the same. It depends on the season of the year, but the coloring is identical otherwise.

And yet we are fascinated by the coming and going of the sun. Even when I was a child, I used to stand outside and watch the sky, sometimes for a full hour from late afternoon until final darkness, watching the delicate changes in the sky and the clouds and the way the light filtered through the trees.

I have not yet lost my wonder.


The rising sun in the mountains in October
A gull at sunrise
Sunset in Douglas
Sunset through clouds

ALONG THE HOUSATONIC IN CONNECTICUT

Cee’s Which Way Photo Challenge – July 28, 2017


And so we have returned home. Bonnie and Gibbs did not starve in our absence. We have a functional hot water heater and surprising rise in the water pressure making me wonder how long the boiler was leaking. Our plumber said he had a lot of work cleaning up the mud that had accumulated behind it. It must have been leaking for a long time. Months? Years?

Sunset in the marina

For the past couple of days, we’ve been talking and having a lovely time. I can’t begin say what a pleasure it was to be with friends. We were having a difficult week … and it was only Wednesday. I don’t have a lot of road pictures, but I thought this one, taken yesterday evening just before the light disappeared might work.

I have two 25 mm “normal” lenses. The Olympus is fast at f1.8, but the Leica is faster at f1.4. It is also the only camera that will take a good picture when the light is very low.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

The next one is from Garry. Garry took almost all the pictures this visit … which you will see as the week progresses!

Photo: Garry Armstrong – Boat slips?

 

SOLITUDE AT SUNRISE

SOLITUDE | THE DAILY POST WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE


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Just before five in the morning. Ogunquit beach, Maine.

A solitary walker on the beach as the sun rises. A seagulls wait on the shore. It’s breakfast time for birds.

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I participate in WordPress' Weekly Photo Challenge 2017
I participate in WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge 2017

OUR LOVE AFFAIR WITH WATER by ELLIN CURLEY

What is it about water that so many people find endlessly fascinating and soul soothing? People pay top dollar to live in homes that have a view of water – any water – ocean, lake, pond, marsh, stream. Prime vacation spots are often on, in or near the water.

I love the sound of our backyard mini waterfall. I can also sit and look at it for hours. The sound of waves lapping onto the shore have been recorded innumerable times for relaxation tapes, sleep aides and comfort for newborns.

Ogunquit sea shore seagulls

People also love the feel of water; pushing through the fingers, falling onto the hand, resisting a closed palm, like in swimming. People walk with their feet in the water at beaches and swim anywhere they can, both under the water and on top. There are a plethora of gadgets to help you play in the water, from inner tubes to noodles, paddle-boards, beach balls, etc. There are also too many water sports to even try to list.

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There is a theory that our obsession with water is rooted in our time in our mother’s womb. As fetuses, we float in the uterus in protective amniotic fluid, gently rocked as our mothers move. We may even hear the sounds of swooshing water. Which could explain the universality of humans’ love affair with water.

But it doesn’t explain why only some people seek the water in many different aspects of their lives.

Personally, we choose to live in the woods — but we own a boat. Listening to water slapping against our hull is our version of Nirvana. Our boat is big enough so we’re not close to the waterline when on-board.

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So we have an inflatable dinghy that we drive around. In that, we are as close to the water level as you can get, like in a canoe or a rowboat. I can’t resist putting my hands in the water and opening my fingers as we ride through the water. I love the sound of the little boat pushing through the water, punctuated by the percussion bursts of waves breaking against its sides.

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I don’t have any earth shattering conclusions to make. I’m sure there are research studies out there on the subject. It’s just that I’m on my boat enjoying being on the water and wondering why it is so satisfying for me. I had a swimming pool and a pond during summers growing up but no one in my family went to beaches or liked boats. We were city folks who ‘roughed it’ in the countryside of Fairfield County, CT during our summer vacations.

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So I have no family history or childhood memories to fall back on, except the pool and the pond. Maybe that, combined with my primal connection with amniotic fluid, is enough.