DAILY PROMPTS: SUNSHINE LESSENED BY SUMMER LEAVES IS DAPPLED – Marilyn Armstrong

#FOWC – SUNSHINE LESSENED BY SUMMER

#RDP – CREATES TREES AND PATHS DAPPLED IN LIGHT


I am not confused by the dappling of the paths and lawns. That’s the way the shady part of summertime looks. My problem is entirely grammatical.

Sunshine lessened through summer leaves IS or ARE dappled?

Dappled deck

I keep thinking the “sunshine” is collective and should take “is,” but one of my three grammar fixers will always disagree with me. I was pretty sure I had the whole present tense issue locked up, but as it turns out, it’s more complicated than that.

And then, there’s the lawn …

How does anyone actually learn English when even the “machinery” used to check it can’t figure it out?

And the woods itself …

Getting past the grammatical confusion, I’m glad I took some wondrously leafy photographs last week … or was it just a couple of days ago? Time is fleeing past me so quickly, I don’t know whether I did whatever it was this morning or a week ago.

Photo: Garry Armstrong – Lad with dappled unicorn!

Just so you know, there are lots of dappled horses and you can lessen anything that was at one time (or another) bigger. I just don’t know if I have any dappled horses or dogs, though I have ridden and kept many dappled creatures.

JAPANESE MAPLE – FROM BABY TO TEENAGER

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The Japanese maple in our garden came home in our car from its birthplace in Maryland. It was just a sprig, planted in a bucket. Eleven years later …

It’s a real tree now. Not entirely grown up. More like a leggy adolescent. But still, it’s a long way from its bucket days.

Because so many people have asked, I’ve added this clip from “The Complete Japanese Maple” which you can look up. I’m pretty sure they will also sell you a tree of your own. Great pictures showing all the sizes of the trees from quite small, to full-size (like ours).


“Japanese maples are the most desirable garden trees that exist. A tree in fall is guaranteed to turn heads and gather admiring looks and the enormous variety of leaf forms, colors and tree shapes means that no matter what your taste or space restrictions, there will be a tree for you. Some grow into small trees 20 feet or more in height, others remain as low shrubs reaching five feet only after many years of growth. They may be upright in form, pendulous or cascading, with red or green leaves and as well as their stunning fall coloring, many have remarkable colors on their new spring leaves too. There are also a wide number of varieties with red or purple leaves all summer, which bring a unique highlight to any garden.

These trees have a reputation for being hard to grow, but this is largely undeserved. With attention given to their location in the garden and some minimal care, they will thrive and increase in beauty every year. Compared with many other trees and shrubs they have few pests or diseases and are versatile enough to thrive in locations ranging from full shade to full sun. They can be grown in the garden, in containers and of course they are ideal subjects for the ancient Japanese art of bonsai.”


Japanese maples also have glorious fall foliage, scarlet and deep yellow, often with red edging. Although I love the red leaf varieties, the autumn tree is so beautiful, it’s worth waiting for. They are among the first to change color and the last to lose their leaves.

IN GOLDEN LIGHT #WRITEPHOTO

THURSDAY PHOTO PROMPT


November.

Just when we think the gold of autumn is fading, the sun sets the world on fire.

Reflections of bronze leaves  glow golden as sunlight skims the water.

Wild birds floating on a river of fire.

Reflection and refraction are transformation, summer’s final bonfire.

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KOMOREBI AND BOKEH: JAPANESE – THE PHOTOGRAPHY LANGUAGE

When talking about photography, English doesn’t cut it. As it turns out, Japanese does.

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The Japanese have a word for everything, it seems. I just learned “komorebi.” It means “sunlight filtering through the leaves of trees,” and by extension, the natural filtering of light through anything. Like glass or curtains, for example.

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It’s just the word I’ve needed. I’ve been chasing that light for more than 40 years.

Bokeh is my previously learned favorite Japanese photographic term. It defines something difficult to say in English: “Bokeh means the aesthetic quality of blur in the out-of-focus areas of an image produced by a lens.”

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Like this?

 

72-romantic-flowers-10162016_01Or that?

Kaity

I’m sure there’s more, but this is my vocabulary lesson for the day.

THE GOLDEN HOUR IS JUST 15 GLORIOUS MINUTES

The “Golden Hour” is a misnomer. It doesn’t last even close to an hour. Sometimes, if you are lucky, it lasts a full quarter of an hour before it’s gone.

Refraction from direct sunlight is unavoidable sometimes, so why not make it part of the picture?
Refraction from direct sunlight is unavoidable sometimes, so why not make it part of the picture?

It’s that time of day which we also call “twilight.” At the end of the afternoon, but before sunset. It is that time when the sun is low in the sky, yet still above the horizon. The rays of the sun slants through trees forming shadowy paths across roads and lawns.

The light is yellow in spring. Ocher in summer. It holds a hint of amber in Autumn, and is white with a touch of blue in winter. It’s the time of long shadows visible rays of sunlight.

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I almost missed it. I had to run outside with the first camera I could grab, hoping it had an appropriate lens and a working battery in it  — and that I hadn’t left its SD card in the computer.

Don’t you just hate what that happens?

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Sorry fellow bloggers. I couldn’t think of a single thing to say about banned  except to say that, to the best of my knowledge, I’m not. Yet. Given the current state of our disunion, anything could happen but I’d prefer to keep my mind off that as long as I can. Too depressing. 

LATE AFTERNOON SUNLIGHT – CEE’S ODDBALL PHOTO CHALLENGE

CEE’S ODD BALL PHOTO CHALLENGE: 2016 WEEK 13

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I have a few interesting pictures for this week’s entry. It rained most of the week and The Cold That Never Ends left me with very little energy to venture out.

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Pretty yet dead tulips
Afternoon sunlight on canvas camera bag
Afternoon sunlight on canvas camera bag

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There are always pictures to take.

As the season advances, the light is changing, bringing the first direct light to the front of the house since last summer.

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LATE AFTERNOON SUNSHINE

Our house is not bright except at sunrise and just before sunset. The bedroom side of the house faces east. The living room faces west. We get the first rays of light just after dawn and immediately before twilight.

late afternoon bouquet

The living room is particularly lovely in the warm months. Today, as we were relaxing after a long day spent mostly in the car, the sunlight was scrumptious. When it shown on the bouquet, I had to act decisively.

The bouquet has about reached the end of its run, but it’s still beautiful. Especially illuminated with the last light of the day.

Another set of pictures using the Olympus f2.8 60mm macro lens. I’m getting very fond of that lens!

And a link to Cee’s Flower of the day!