LOST IN TRANSLATION – PICTURES FROM WORDS – Marilyn Armstrong

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: PICK A WORD IN OCTOBER – Y3

From Paula:

Welcome to another Pick-a-Word Thursday’s Special. I hope that the choices I made for this month’s photo challenge will allow you a lot of liberty in interpretation. As always you can pick either of the 5, some or all of them. Here are the words to choose from: gushing,  aperture,  frontier, triplets, tapered.


Gushing

Aperture

Frontier in Arizona

Three Margaret O’Brien dolls, from Madame Alexander

Tapered candle flame

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LOST IN TRANSLATION – WORDS FOR PHOTOGRAPHY – Marilyn Armstrong

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: PICK A WORD IN AUGUST Y3

FROM PAULA:

Here we are again facing another Pick a Word challenge. The words I picked for you this time are hardly challenging. Still, I hope you will enjoy taking part in it: fortified, chic, submerged, embodiment, prehistoric.

Note from me: I’m happy to NOT have to look up the words!


This is as chic as I ever get!

About to be submerged — and submerged!

Photo: Garry Armstrong – Embodiment of a perfect sunset!

Fortified?

A storm over the prehistoric remnants of a Native American tribe forced — to the best of my knowledge — from their land by drought.

An embodiment of the Saguaro cactus in the Phoenix mountains 

And a final embodiment:

Sam “The Man” Adams … in bronze, life-size – Very influential and definitely, an embodiment!

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THURSDAY’S SPECIAL – SATURATION – Marilyn Armstrong

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: SATURATION

FROM PAULA: I am sorry I can’t always keep this photo challenge a weekly event due to my ever-increasing workload and stresses at work, but whenever I can, I’m happy to be here to challenge you and look at your entries. For this week I thought it would be a good idea to tackle “saturation”. It can be interpreted as colour saturation in photography – especially evident in the image post-processing, which is what I did in my examples below, but you can also take it from another angle. Did you know that you can be saturated with work too? 


I can’t get to my photography in a normal way because I’ve been hacked and my PC is closed down until it gets fixed. So … I winged this one. Probably not my most brilliant work, but it was as good as I can do on this computer without any of my normal processing tools!

Is this more or less saturation? Technically, this is higher saturation but I think it appears less saturated because I changed the tint slightly. 

As I said: technically, this is less saturated than the first picture. Really, the problem is not just definition, but perception. Same picture, but the details are sufficiently different to change the nature of how you see it. 

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ZOOMING IN AND OUT

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: ZOOM IN, ZOOM OUT

From Paula:

Here’s another Thursday’s Special photo challenge for you. This time the theme is “zoom in, zoom out”. Show one subject/scene (whatever you like) from up close and far. Let’s see how different things seem when you have a closer look. Take your time posting for this challenge and don’t forget to have fun. Happy Thursday!


I have two cameras with serious zoom lenses and most of the time, those are the cameras I use. Why? Because no matter how superb my other cameras are, I never know what I’m going to shoot and a good — long — zoom is the difference between getting the shot — or missing it.

Close up as the water at Roaring Dam hits the rocks below …

Middle of the falls at Roaring Dam

And back a bit more …

Photo: Garry Armstrong – And from below the falls, on the lower path … and using an entirely different camera a lens …

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PICK A WORD – PAULA’S FIRST PHOTO CHALLENGE FOR 2018

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: PICK A WORD IN JANUARY – Y3


Paula’s first post in 2018 is a “Pick a Word” challenge this year. No easy words here. I had to look up three out of five. I’m good on four out of five, but “auricomous” which means “yellow-haired” or probably, in our language blond? I’m not sure I have any blonds in my files. Oops on that one. Otherwise, we’re pretty good to go.

Definitions:

Candescent – Glowing, as by fire (like incandescent, missing and “in”).
Algid – Cold. Very cold. Tomorrow we’re expecting around a foot of snow. Got that.
Angular – Something with angles. Used photographically to me it means finding an angle in the picture that will draw the viewer’s eyes into the image.
Auricomous – Yellow-haired. Nope. No blondes around here, but maybe a blonde dog.
Festive – Having just finished Christmas, I think I’ve got that one nailed.

Candescent

Algid – Snowy and cold

Angular fence!

A golden retriever is as yellow as I can get!

Auricomous – A golden retriever is as yellow as I can get!

Festive on the commons!

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THE BEST OF 2017 – ONE OR TWO FAVORITE PHOTOGRAPHS

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: MY BEST PHOTO IN 2017

Talk about a daunting challenge. My best picture for 2017! I think maybe I need to look for my favorite because I’m not sure what “best” would really be. Even “favorite” is pretty daunting. I know which was the most popular, but best?

I couldn’t do it. I got it down to two, but I apologize because I just couldn’t decide.

This first one is a favorite because it is the road on which we live with the sun going down. It probably isn’t “best” because it wasn’t taken with one of my better lenses and was a “grabbed” shot, less than half a mile from home. Taken mid January 2017.

But this final one is a picture I’ve taken almost every year for the past ten years. This particular tree is a sugar maple and on a good year turns completely scarlet. This year, it didn’t turn red, but pumpkin orange. In its own way, it is nearly perfect because it is exactly what I wanted.

October 11, 2017


GARRY’S PHOTOGRAPHS – MY FAVORITE AMONG HIS PHOTOGRAPHS

This is my favorite among Garry’s pictures. It is as good an autumn shot of the Blackstone Canal as I’ve seen.

Photo: Garry Armstrong

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WORDS & PICS – ALMOST DECEMBER

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: PICK A WORD IN DECEMBER Y2


It is time for another “Pick a Word” themed challenge and it is the last one this year. As usual you get five words to choose from: sagacious,  non-human, portrayal. remains, stellar.

One sagacious American — and a fine maker of beer

Non-humans out-number humans around here

Portrayal of my granddaughter

No remains — except the pits

Stellar orb, aka the Sun

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SOMETHING OLD – THURSDAY’S SPECIAL

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: TRACES OF THE PAST Y3-10


The old town of Tombstone was rebuilt to make the movie “Tombstone.” That’s the one with Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer and it was all shot in this town. The OK Corral is here, too and you can see the gunfight every day at 3 pm, in season. So it’s old … but it has been rebuilt. It’s a great place to be. Everything looks just like the movie, including the saloon. Except, of course, you can buy modern tee shirts and all that kind of stuff.

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TRACING THE PAST

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: TRACES OF THE PAST


FROM PAULA: “Quite often when I travel I take an unconventional approach. It is not about learning about buildings and places that I visit, or knowing all the dates and names; it is about stepping into the past, and if I am lucky enough to have only the company of my choice with me, it is like a time travel in which I write my own script.” 

Well put. I feel that way not only when I travel, but it is the reason I collect antiquities. Each is a physical piece of the past. I hold it and imagine how many other hands have held this piece of pottery or sculpture. Who were they? What was the world like? How did it happen that this fragile thing could survive a thousand years when, at any time, a slip of the hand would have shattered it.

Yesterday, my son gave me an old, small (as these things go) Victorian secretary with a glass display top, replacing a piece that I’d bought from a carpenter friend that was charming, but not exactly a great piece of furniture. I have spend the last 24 hours cleaning small things, finding things I’d forgotten I have, moving stuff around from this shelf, to that shelf. The former piece was open, no glass. There were just two shelves, one open top, the other 16-inches tall. The secretary’s shelves are about 13-inches high, so the taller things have had to move elsewhere, and some of the plates will fit, but not on their wood stands. Housing and displaying very old, delicate things is not as simple as it looks unless you have a lot more space for display than me. But, I did it. I gave away one picture — big 11X14 of the dawn over Ogunquit beach to my son and his partner. I have many things that need a piece of wall and there’s no wall available. I own the original of that print, so I can make another. Maybe I will. On canvas, this time.


I remembered something I’d put out of my mind and it saddened me. Last March, I (me, no one else, just me) knocked down a display cabinet in the living room. I wrote about it here: WHEN GOOD SHELVES GO BAD.

Qianlong (1736-1795) porcelain vase.

Qianlong (1736-1795) porcelain vase.

I had forgotten that the Qianlong (1736-1795) porcelain vase (the white vase with the Chinese characters) was one of two fatalities in that crash. I’m very glad I took pictures of it. It was probably my favorite piece. The prettiest and in the best condition of any of my antique vases. It was, in fact, almost flawless.

It no longer exists in this world. That’s the thing about the antiques and antiquities we collect. We collect them for ourselves because they are beautiful and rare and come from the mists of time. But we also preserve them so they will continue to exist in this world. Sadly, I failed in this and one other much older small vase.

There is more to collecting that just “having stuff.” Real collectors know this and it is probably more addictive than heroine. And possibly, even more expensive.

INFLATED – THE WINTER THAT WAS

Thursday’s Special: Inflated

Two years ago, we got twelve feet of snow in just 5 weeks. I call that inflated. It was huge. Epic. Amazing. I hope we never have another winter like it, but we probably will, sooner or later.


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There’s a full-size car under that snow. And that ski slope is supposed to be a driveway. The snow plow that came to clear it later got stuck and had to be pulled out by a tow truck.

NEW ENGLAND PANORAMA

Thursday’s Special: Panorama

Today the Thursday’s Special theme is Panorama. It does not to have to be a panorama of an ancient city, or city at all, nor does it have to be a photo stitched of multiple images as in my case of Venice. Show me your pictures of views that you found inspiring.

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I don’t stitch images. I don’t do HDR. I don’t have a panorama camera. I do, however, take vistas when I see them because they can be breathtaking. I can’t resist an amazing image.

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All of these are favorites. Mountains and valleys … and a city. Extra points if you can spot Fenway Park!

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REFLECTIONS IN A FROZEN RIVER

PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE
THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: REFLECTION

Not surprisingly, I have many pictures where reflections are the primary focus of the picture. I wanted, as Paula suggests, to use something a little different, at least different for me.

With that in mind, I selected pictures of the partly frozen Blackstone River, the reflections of the trees and snowbound banks showing black and shadowy on the glassy surface.

Reflections in a slightly frozen river. March 2015.

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