DAYLILIES WITH BUDS – Marilyn Armstrong

FOTD – July 5, 2019 – Daylily

It’s definitely the season of the daylilies. They really are everywhere. I keep trying to find new ways to take pictures of daylilies that don’t look exactly like the last set of daylilies, but so far … well … they look like daylilies. In particular, the leggy tall ones we grow locally.

More Daylilies — and an old tractor

Buds and Daylily

TRANSFORMED TRACTOR

WEEKLY WORDPRESS PHOTO CHALLENGE – REPURPOSE


We hadn’t been living here a week when I spotted the line of old farm tractors. Some of them had “For Sale” signs on them. Everyone has a weakness and mine is for old machinery. I love it. In another community, they’d probably already have been consigned to the junkyard, crushed for the metal content.

“Wow,” I said to Garry. “Wouldn’t that be cool? Kids could climb on it. We could build a garden around it.” And then, we went home.

A month later, on our tenth anniversary in September, a flatbed trailer backed down our driveway. It delivered my 1924 Fordson Tractor.  We gave it a Model-A Ford steering wheel, an old license plate — though with its seized engine, it wasn’t going anywhere under its own power — and a new seat. After Owen built the garden with the rocks repurposed from the wall in the woods which repurposed from them just being big rocks in a field that was not full of trees, the tractor moved next to the garden wall. It has a new life as garden decor. A Japanese maple tree is growing directly in front of it and there’s no way to extract the tractor, so as long as we are here to protect it, the tractor will have a home on our land.

Some people have asked us why we have that piece of junk in the garden. What can I tell them? How many women are lucky enough to have a husband who’d buy his wife an antique tractor for their 10th anniversary? What a guy!

I participate in WordPress' Weekly Photo Challenge 2017

I participate in WordPress’ Weekly Photo Challenge 2017

LOVE ME, LOVE MY TRACTOR

You may have noticed the old tractor in the middle of the garden. When we were trying to sell the house some years ago, a couple of potential buyers commented how they’d have to have it towed away. I put a mental black mark next to their names because I love that tractor. If you don’t appreciate the tractor, you won’t like my house (they didn’t)

72-Tractor-29Jun_13It’s a rusty 1928 Fordson. Not a rare vintage; it was common farm equipment in its day. I loved it the moment I saw it, sitting on a lawn up the road a piece. I wanted it. I knew it didn’t run and never would, but for me it was the perfect garden accessory.

Some people put flamingos in their garden. Deer. Ducks. Around Halloween, anything goes and for Christmas — well — we’ve all seen the lengths to which some people will go.

One family just up the road from here has a crèche, a wishing well, several gnomes and a lighthouse almost large enough to use as a real lighthouse, except it’s hollow plastic. I believe they also have several types of small animals tucked in between the other statuary et al. It’s a very busy garden and half the size of ours. Only careful landscaping has allowed them to fit quite so much garden bric-à-brac in so small a space.

And this stuff’s not cheap. If you’ve ever gone and priced garden statuary, a nicely done piece — cement not plastic — can cost you as much as remodeling your kitchen. Well, almost as much. Okay, about half the price.

The tractor wasn’t cheap. It was (is) a real tractor, not some phony doodad. Someone farmed using that piece of machinery. It was, in its day, a serious investment. So I don’t understand why someone would think a fake lighthouse looks cool while yearning for a bigger bogus wishing well, but find our antique tractor odd. Maybe they’d like it better if we’d bought it at Walmart?

tractor with daffodils

Garry bought it for me as a tenth anniversary gift. Now that is a husband who gets his wife. He knew to whom he is married. And that’s why we are still married and likely to remain so forever (or as close to forever as we may).

As we approach our 25th anniversary — now a mere 10 weeks distant — I love my tractor more than ever. It has stood the test of time. In another 13-1/2 years, it will have its hundredth birthday. In its second life, during the past 15 years we have planted around it and vines have grown over it. It is as much a part of the garden as the earth on which it stands.

Love me, love my tractor.

My Garden Now

Through the last month, it rained every day. It didn’t rain all day every day, but it rained for at least a few hours, most of the time heavily. Downpours, accompanied by thunder and lightning, sometimes wind with occasional small tornadoes in the region too. Not surprisingly, we didn’t go out much unless we had business to conduct or groceries to buy.

Imagine my surprise when finally the monsoons stopped and I discovered our garden had gone into hyper overdrive, producing the most enormous crop of day lilies and hedge roses I’ve ever seen. All the fancy roses died of one blight or another over the past few years, and the spring flowers did poorly with so little sun, the late ending of the cold and snow melt and then the endless rain, but apparently, the day lilies and hedge roses couldn’t have been happier and showed their delight by reproducing like mad.

The hedge roses are small, aromatic, almost miniature and grow in bushy clumps so thick with thorns that they could keep out even the most determined burglar … or creature from the woods. We have learned the hard way to not even go near them. They grab at you and tear you — and your clothing — to shreds. Gloves are little help because they grab every part of you, including hair.

We have given the garden to the roses. They have won the day, the pink and the red. And the lovely Chinese lilies have been choked out by the hardy day lilies (AKA tiger lilies). Even the weeds have been unable to survive the determination of these flowering plants.

This is our garden. Now. Gorgeous. Wild. And dangerously full of thorns.