THE GOLDFINCH CAME HOME! – Marilyn Armstrong

It’s not the big flock I had last year, but three Goldfinch showed up today and hung around long enough for me to get their pictures. They were the stars of last winter’s bird portraits. They are so awfully cute.

Welcome home American Goldfinch

We also had a visitor I haven’t seen in years. It was a baby Chipmunk! We used to have hordes of Chipmunks chittering at us as they tried to take over the driveway. Then the bobcat showed up and he ate them. All of them. This is the first Chipmunk I’ve seen in at least five years. He was so little!

What a cute pair!
A Titmouse and his little pal

Hunting, I guess, for seeds left on the deck. For some reason, I didn’t take his pictures. I was so bedazzled just seeing him on the deck. I even had time to call Garry over to see him too, so I certainly could have taken his picture, but I was having so much fun watching her skitter around the deck looking for seeds.

A better version of a flying … wren?

The birds are coming back. Slowly. The Mourning Doves are still missing, but maybe they are just being shy. They are also a bit big for these feeders. They liked picking seeds from the deck. They are flat feeders.

On a positive note, we have lots of joyously singing Carolina Wrens.

Fair Lady Cardinal

Also, I saw, but he was gone before I could get the picture, a full red-headed woodpecker. Not the big one who looks like Woody. This one looks just like the Red-Bellied Woodpecker, but his entire head is completely red. It’s the first time I’ve ever seen one outside a bird book.

Sometimes, it’s good to live in the woods.

ENSURING VETERANS WITH HEARING LOSS DON’T SUFFER IN SILENCE – Guest Author: ALI LOWE

How We Can Ensure Veterans With Hearing Loss
Don’t Suffer In Silence

While America is proud to honor those who served in the U.S. military, many of America’s veterans return home carrying physical, psychosocial and psychological trauma from their tours of duty. Millions of active service personnel develop hearing loss, tinnitus or other auditory conditions during their military career.

Today, as many as 2.7 million veterans are living with a hearing condition as a result of their military service. Repeated exposure to loud noises from heavy equipment, roadside bombs and gunfire is often the root cause. While hearing loss and tinnitus is often overlooked, they are actually the most common service-related health issue affecting veterans. For friends, relatives, and employers of veterans with a hearing condition, it’s important to understand not just how it can impact their lives but also what you can do to help them.

Adjusting To Civilian Life

Adapting to a new civilian life from a military career is often much more than just simply changing job roles. For most veterans, it means a change in virtually every area of their life. From their home, career and training to their healthcare, lifestyle and the community they are part of. But when a veteran is having to live with a hearing condition, this can all become even harder. They may find themselves struggling to understand friends and colleagues, especially when there is background noise. Hearing loss and tinnitus can make it very hard for veterans to maintain relationships with family members and friends and can have a devastating long-term impact on their lives.

Hearing Conditions Affecting Veterans

Veterans are 30% more likely to have a severe hearing impairment compared to nonveterans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The type of hearing loss that veterans generally experience happens when the sensory hair cells located in the inner ear become damaged or even destroyed. These hair cells are what translates sound into electrical impulses which are then sent to the brain for interpretation. These hair cells do not regenerate.

But hearing aids can amplify sounds and is the most common treatment option. Damage to the sensory hair cells can also lead to tinnitus. Veterans with tinnitus may hear intermittent or constant buzzing, ringing or hissing sounds that can be so severe it stops them from being able to sleep or concentrate. There is no known cure for tinnitus, but in most cases, it can be managed. Hearing aids can sometimes provide enough sound amplification to help mask the tinnitus.

Hearing Loss And Civilian Employment

Veteran unemployment has continued to remain below the national job rate, according to data from the Bureau of Labor. Hearing loss, deafness, and tinnitus should not be a barrier to a veteran applying for and excelling in a job after they’ve left the military. All that is needed is for managers and colleagues to understand and support them.

One of many hearing tests

While veterans may feel reluctant to disclose their hearing loss, especially to a new employer, doing so ensures that managers can make any necessary adjustments to the working environment or even just how they approach the way they communicate to their team. Certain federal laws including The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires employers to make reasonable accommodation for employees with disabilities, including hearing loss.

Nicole Seymour, audiologist on the job!

Managers should ensure that any veteran in their team with a hearing condition has the appropriate devices and resources they need such as amplified phones with an extra-loud ringer and adjustable handset volume. Giving team members the opportunity to learn crucial communication skills to support their veteran colleague and other existing colleagues with hearing loss can also be extremely beneficial.

Hearing Loss And Social Isolation

When veterans are living with a hearing condition, they often avoid social occasions especially busy and noisy places, such as a restaurant, as they can feel socially excluded as they simply cannot keep up with the conversations around them. This can have a huge effect on their confidence as well as their relationships and can gradually become a bigger and bigger problem for them. Hearing loss is often linked with a variety of mental health problems such as stress, anxiety, and depression which are conditions that veterans are already at a greater risk of developing.

A hearing loss, however, shouldn’t stop a veteran from socializing and spending time with their friends and loved ones. But it can be hard when certain places are so noisy and it can feel too overwhelming for someone with hearing loss. That’s why it can often be better to choose somewhere that is much quieter and even pre-book to ensure you get a table in the quieter part of the venue.

Garry and Dr. Remenschneider. When your doctor is not much older than your grandchild, you know you’ve put on a few years.

If the background music is too loud, don’t be afraid to ask the manager to turn it down. If you feel awkward about it just explain that it can be very difficult for people with hearing aids to cope with loud background music. Choose a venue with good lighting, so that anyone in the party that needs to lipread can do so easily. Don’t forget, when everyone takes their seat, make sure the veteran with hearing loss is in the best spot to be able to hear and see everyone.

What Friends And Loved Ones Can Do

Friends and relatives of veterans living with a hearing condition can make a huge difference to the quality of their lives by taking a few simple steps. For instance, when someone has a degree of hearing loss, don’t just suddenly speak at them and expect them to respond. Always make sure you have their attention by using their name before you start talking to them. Try to avoid talking to them from behind, instead tap them on the arm to get their attention. Remember that it can often be harder for them to hear and understand what you are saying if everyone is talking at once, they are tired, they have tinnitus or there’s a lot of background noise such as the TV or the vacuum cleaner.


While we are grateful for the service our veterans have given for their country, many return home with severe hearing loss that can be devastating. As friends, relatives, and employers of veterans, it’s important \we understand the impact of hearing loss and what we can do to ensure they enjoy a happy and fulfilling civilian life.

See also:

HEARING GEORGE RAFT – BY GARRY ARMSTRONG

HEARING, IMPLANTS — AND WHAT’S THAT SOUND? – Marilyn Armstrong

 

THE CLASS OF 1969 – BY ELLIN CURLEY

Going to a 50th High School Reunion can be an exciting prospect – if it’s yours. I recently went to my husband, Tom’s 50th Reunion in Schenectady, New York, and, to be honest, I wasn’t really looking forward to it. I’m shy in big groups and pictured myself following Tom around and having nothing to say to a room full of strangers.

Tom’s ID badge with his senior photo

I was pleasantly surprised. We met three of Tom’s high school friends and their spouses at a local tavern before the official opening cocktail party. Everyone was delightful and friendly and we had a great time. Tom’s high school best friend, Stewie was there with his wife, Mar-C. In preparing for the reunion, Tom and Stewie discovered that they had been living an hour away from each other in Connecticut for over thirty years! We got together a few weeks before the reunion so I already knew two other people. And Mar-C and I had compared notes on what to wear to each of the reunion events so my comfort level was pretty good by the time we arrived in Schenectady.

Tom and me with Stewie and Mar-c

After our private dinner, we headed over to the party and mingled with the 130 members of the Linton High Class of 1969 who showed up. Everyone was easy going and so nice. I realized from attending 20th and 40th reunions of my own, that as we all get older, the whole high school dynamic changes. You don’t have the cliques anymore or the high school rivalries. People are no longer trying to impress everyone with their job or professional accomplishments, or, as time went on, the jobs and professional accomplishments of their children.

The main topic of conversation was – are you retired yet? If so, good for you and what are you doing to have fun? Most of us had reached the stage of life when we can wake up whenever we feel like it and spend the day doing whatever we feel like doing. Everyone I talked to seemed genuinely happy and fulfilled. No competition any more. Just stories of hobbies and grandchildren. Some people still did projects for work but on their own terms and schedules. Some people were traveling and having a ball exploring the world.

Class of 1969 yearbook and 50th reunion yearbook update

At the dinner the second night, there were fun games with prizes for the winners. Who’s been married the longest? 50 years! Who has the most kids? Six. Who’s kids are the oldest? 50! And the youngest? 23. I was thrilled that Tom tied for the coolest job – he was a CBS network news director and audio engineer and the other guy was a documentary filmmaker.

Tom was well known at his high school. He ran for student council every year against the guy who always won. So Tom’s campaign speeches were more of a stand-up comedy act, the comic relief. They were apparently greatly enjoyed and appreciated by the other students, so lots of people came up to Tom with big hugs and cheerful greetings. I was very proud of Tom, especially when he got up to introduce the three videos he created for the reunion. These were the centerpieces of the dinner presentations.

By the time we left, I knew lots of people by name and we had promised to get together again with the ones who live a reasonable car ride away. I really felt like I made new friends and Tom got to renew friendships from long ago.

Tom and Stewie

We left the reunion happy and wired – until our car died before we even got out of Schenectady. Luckily we broke down right at a service station on the NY State Thruway so it only took AAA a half hour to get a tow truck to us. We rode the 2 ½ hours home in the back of a truck with zero suspension. It felt like we were driving over cobblestones for the entire ride. We got home at 3 AM but even this unpleasant finale didn’t dampen our positive feelings about the weekend we spent in a time capsule. We captured time in a bottle and loved every minute of it!

Tom and me at the dinner

BETWEEN THE LINES ARE THE SEEDS OF HOPE -DAY 6 – Marilyn Armstrong

EATING SEEDS BETWEEN THE LINES – Marilyn Armstrong

The birds are slowly coming back. Slowly. I don’t know if more are going to show up. I’m particularly worried about the disappearance of the Mourning Doves. They don’t migrate. They live here year-round, but I haven’t seen one. But they are shy and it takes them a while to find their way to the seeds.

Meanwhile, there was quite a flurry of birds today. And here are some squared up pictures. Lots of lines. The entire feeder is all wire lines. The deck is also lines made from wood planks and posts.

Between the lines is lovely Lady Cardinal

But these two pictures are special because one is lovely Lady Cardinal. While Sir Cardinal is showier in his brilliant scarlet feathers, she is — in her own way — a gorgeous bird. Her colors are wonderful!

Pecking twixt the lines at the feeder, a Red-Bellied Woodpecker

And the second one is one of my all-time favorite birds, the Red-bellied Woodpecker.